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A Model for Evaluating Breach Detection Readiness

Given that modern attacks are complex and sophisticated, there is not a single product or tool that will ever be 100% effective at detecting threats. Prevention eventually fails. Therefore, you need protection before, during, and after an attack.

Modern-day networks are large and complicated. It is a nightmare for incident response teams and security investigators because it often takes days and months to identify that their networks were compromised. A wide variety of tools, technologies and platforms are available, like big data platforms, machine learning algorithms, statistical techniques, threat intelligence platforms, reputation feeds etc. It is often confusing for the decision makers to identify what is needed for their environment.
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Reintroducing Snort 3.0

Snort 3.0

A little more than a year ago when Sourcefire became a part of Cisco, we reaffirmed our commitment to open source innovation and pledged to continue support for Snort and other open source projects. Our announcement of the OpenAppID initiative earlier this year was one of several ways we have delivered on this promise.

Today we are announcing the alpha release of a new Snort 3.0 architecture. This alpha release builds on several ideas that were part of the original 3.0 prototype developed several years ago and goes well beyond those initial concepts.

Snort 3.0 expands on the extensible architecture users have come to know and includes several new capabilities that make it easier for people to learn and run Snort. We encourage you check out it out at www.snort.org, give us your feedback and help us build a strong foundation for the future. As Joel mentions in his post, this is a very early release that is intended for community feedback more than anything else.

When I first began building Snort, I architected it so that we could continue to extend it over time. By working with the Snort community, it quickly evolved from the initial primitive idea of an easy-to-use intrusion detection engine to the powerful traffic analysis and control capabilities we have today. With millions of downloads and hundreds of thousands of registered users, Snort is the most widely deployed IPS technology in the world and has become the standard for intrusion detection and prevention. Snort is also the foundation of Cisco’s Next-Generation IPS and is one of the core technologies that cemented Sourcefire’s position as a leader in the security industry.

Cisco understands the power of open source and how it can help customers solve tough challenges. In the coming months you’ll hear more from us about Snort 3.0 and our continued efforts to deliver meaningful capabilities that underscore this commitment.

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Cisco Announces Intent to Acquire Neohapsis

Today, businesses are looking at security in a strategic, comprehensive way to protect mission critical processes and assets. There has never been a greater need to understand the impact that security threats can have on a company’s bottom line. For these reasons, experienced security advice is now among the table stakes required to assess and address the threat landscape that faces enterprises today. The skills and capabilities companies need to maintain a strong security posture, keep pace with rapidly evolving threats and take full advantage of new technologies that can protect their businesses are rare and difficult to retain.

The right advisory service can change all of that.

I am pleased to announce Cisco’s intent to acquire privately held Neohapsis, a Chicago-based security advisory company providing services to address customers’ evolving information security, risk management, and compliance challenges. Neohapsis provides risk management, compliance, cloud, application, mobile, and infrastructure security solutions to Fortune 500 customers.

Together, Cisco, Neohapsis and our partner ecosystem will deliver comprehensive services to help our customers build the security capabilities required to remain secure and competitive in today’s markets. This will help our customers overcome operational and technical security vulnerabilities, achieve a comprehensive view of their risks, take advantage of new business models, and define structured approaches for better protection.

The Neohapsis team will join the Cisco Security Services organization under the leadership of Senior Vice President and General Manager Bryan Palma. The acquisition is expected to close in the second quarter of fiscal year 2015. We look forward to Neohapsis’ outstanding team and technology joining Cisco!

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Dridex Is Back, then it’s gone again

This post was authored by Armin Pelkmann and Earl Carter.

Talos Security Intelligence and Research Group noticed a reappearance of several Dridex email campaigns, starting last week and continuing into this week as well. Dridex is in a nutshell, malware designed to steal your financial account information. The attack attempts to get the user to install the malicious software on their system through an until lately, rarely exploited attack vector: Microsoft Office Macros. Recently, we noticed a resurgence of macro abuse. If macros are not enabled, social engineering techniques are utilized to try to get the user to enable them. Once the malware is installed on the system, it is designed to steal your online banking credentials when you access your banking site from an infected system.

Talos analyzed three separate campaigns in the last days, all distinguishable from their subject lines. Read More »

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday for December 2014: Light Month, Some Changes

This post was authored by Yves Younan.

Today, Microsoft is releasing their final Update Tuesday of 2014. Last year, the end of year update was relatively large. This time, it’s relatively light with a total of seven bulletins, covering 24 CVEs. Three of those bulletins are rated critical and four are considered to be important. Microsoft has made a few changes to the way they report their bulletins. Microsoft has dropped the deployment priority (DP) rating, which was very much environment-specific and might not be all that useful for non-default installations. Instead, they are now providing an exploitability index (XI), which ranges from zero to three. With zero denoting active exploitation and three denoting that it’s unlikely that the vulnerability would be exploited. Another change is to more clearly report on how the vulnerability was disclosed: was Microsoft notified via coordinated vulnerability disclosure or was the vulnerability publicly known before being released? Read More »

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