Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Enterprise Networks

Just What is the Business Case for BYOD?

Let Them Eat Tablets: BYOD Drives Employee Satisfaction

My observation from talking to customers and seeing how bring your own device (BYOD) is being adopted is that there are two scenarios for the BYOD business case:

  1. Application-specific mobility: specific industry applications with a proven ROI
  2. Enterprise-wide mobility: adoption over many enterprises, regardless of industry type or worker type, softer or harder-to-prove ROI

Application Specific

The first scenario is one where IT will provide employees with a mobile device. This scenario is industry-specific, has a shorter time to return on investment, is simpler to quantify, and the ROI is easier to prove.  Devices stay in the control and ownership of the organization and its IT department. This scenario includes capturing data at the point of retail activity and enabling data capture and access to workers who traditionally do not sit at desks in front of PCs.

Enterprise Wide

The second scenario is where the true BYOD explosion is happening and has the potential to change the way we work everywhere. Cisco’s Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG) recently conducted a survey,  Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

How much does telecommuting save, anyway? (Hint: LOTS)

Rely on the trusty Internet Business Services Group within the Cisco to come up with insightful research nuggets on how we all really work.  Their latest IBSG Horizons Study, “The Everywhere Employee“,  gives some fascinating detail on the dollars and sense underlying the idea of working “your way”.

Most interesting to me, of course, is the part about telecommuting.  Did you know that 44% of knowledge workers telecommute at least one day a week?  And that this one day a week alone saves companies $2,400 a year per employee?

So let’s do the math (my favorite part).  In a 10,000 person company, 4,400 employees work one day a week from somewhere else, which translates to a whopping $11 million a year.  Enough to pay for some nice executive bonuses!

This pairs nicely with the findings of a study Stanford University professors published in November 2011, “Does Working from Home Work?”.  They gave an emphatic “yes” and also ran the numbers specific to their use case (which examined full-time telecommuters), located in Appendix A4.

So how does this relate to video? In every way possible. Not only can you use a nice, sleek EX90 TelePresence unit on your home office desk, you can use Jabber video on your tablet. Or take your laptop into the neighborhood coffeeshop and join the video-based Webex meeting (just please remember to mute: coffee grinders are loud).

See you on video!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Broadband ROI: Calculating the Payback in Sweden

By Howard Baldwin, Contributing Columnist

When most of us were in school, our teachers instructed us to “show our work.” It wasn’t enough that we came to a conclusion; we had to demonstrate how we had arrived at that conclusion.

That’s why this October 2011 report on the socioeconomic effect of fiber to the home (FTTH), sponsored by the Swedish government’s broadband council, Bredbandsforum, is so interesting: the authors, Marco Forzati and Crister Mattsson, show exactly how they arrived at their numbers — achieving a positive payback of 1.5:1 in five years.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Cisco UCS Business Advantage Delivered: Just the Facts!

There are a lot of competitive claims made that pit one vendor against another. Its important to make a claim and back it up with the facts. Today I would like to share a fact-based analysis which validates that Cisco UCS enables you to gain competitive advantage by making your data center infrastructure more flexible, agile, and cost effective.  As a result, the Cisco UCS truly transforms the business economics of today’s data centers.

The way we approach IT has been changing over the last few years. Executive management, employees, partners, and customers continue to demand more services. Waiting for applications and services to deliver information is not an option.

IT organizations are beginning to come around to taking a holistic perspective, one where they view their compute, network, and storage components as being part of a larger resource pool that has to be purchased, cabled, configured, powered, cooled, and maintained. When organizations look at their infrastructure holistically, they start to realize the cost of the traditional ways of doing business.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Cisco UCS Servers, Blade Server Chassis and TCO, part 2

Cisco UCS Servers and Blade Server Evolution, part 1, as the title suggests, discussed blade server evolution and why Cisco UCS is a game changer.  Now let’s talk about what the implications are for blade server TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) and how Cisco Unified Computing System scales vs. legacy blade architectures.

Blade Server TCO and Scale

Scale is the crux of the problem that has historically been the barrier for blade servers to deliver on their initial promise.  Scale for I/O.  Scale for Servers.  Scale for Management.  Cisco identified these shortfalls in the traditional legacy blade architecture and came to the marketplace with an innovative, game changing redefined architecture – Cisco UCS.

As discussed in “part 1”, to move the bar for blade chassis, we to better consolidate I/O, management and scale.  Enter Cisco UCS.  Deliver everything at scale: servers and I/O and blade chassis and management etc.  Deliver a new design, rather than retreading an old dead end chassis ‘building block’ design.

Efficiency and Scale by Design

The requisite new design is what Cisco delivered. Cisco UCS is a variable chassis count, variable server count, variable I/O capacity, smart scaling architecture.

Figure 1 is the Cisco design, a converged I/O (FCoE – lossless FC and Enet combined) that scales.  It provides easy, efficient infrastructure scaling across:  multiple chassis, multiple servers, racks, rows and yes, it even includes the integration of rack servers into the solution.

Figure 1: Cisco UCS architecture – 10 x 8 blade chassis = 80 blade servers, 20 cables (add more I/O by simply adding cables – easy scaling)

Figure 2 is a Non-Converged legacy blade chassis I/O architecture. More = more… of everything.  More chassis to hold more blades is OK, that makes sense.  But more Switches?  More cables?  More points of Management?  More complexity?  Not too good.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,