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Leadership and Vision – Two critical ingredients for achieving regional resiliency

On May 24, 2012, the non-profit Sustainable Silicon Valley and its partners gathered at West Summit 2012, with hundreds of others, to explore interlocking themes: Global Trade, Regional Resilience, and Climate Volatility. The Summit featured high-caliber speakers and sponsors from corporations, governmental agencies, NGOs and educational institutions.

I was part of a panel entitled, “Leadership and Vision to Achieve Regional Resiliency,” which focused on the twin challenges facing cities — sustainability and resiliency. We honed in on best practices gleaned to date and how leaders can catalyze the deep transformation necessary to build a sustainable future. Read More »

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The Resilient Society: The Next Phase of Public Sector Reform

Public sector decision makers are under enormous pressure to deliver results in difficult and uncertain times. In late 2010 and early 2011, the Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG) conducted in-depth interviews with more than 100 senior public sector executives from around the world—at the city, regional, and national levels. Responses from these officials were remarkably consistent regarding the key challenges they face in a world undergoing significant economic, political, environmental, and social transitions.

Some of these public leaders expressed concerns about their organizations’ capacity to respond to new policy and service demands, budget reductions, and the need to engage new technology platforms for innovation and service delivery. Other challenges related to the public sector’s ability to help cities, regions, and countries navigate the current uncertain and volatile environment.   Read More »

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The Misalignment Between The Economic Success of Local Government and Their Residents

As you can see from some of the other posts here, at the request of the US Conference of Mayors, I’ve been focusing on an economic development strategy that will work in the future.  As a result of that work, I’ve been presenting my ideas in many places and before many audiences, generally including mayors or other senior officials of local government.

Without going into the whole line of reasoning, I discuss the combined effects of (1) a future with ubiquitous high quality communications and (2) the shift of the labor force to providing ideas and other intangible services.  One implication of these trends is the disaggregation of the monolithic big company that would concentrate jobs in a city and, as an alternative, the empowerment of fluid teams of individuals.

To drive the point home, I argue that the true measure of the economic success of a city is the sum (or the median?) of the income and wealth of its residents — and not the total sales of companies that might have a local postal address there. Read More »

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Making MPI survive process failures

February 27, 2011 at 12:00 pm PST

Arguably, one of the biggest weaknesses of MPI is its lack of resilience — most (if not all) MPI implementations will kill an entire MPI job if any individual process dies.  This is in contrast to the reliability of TCP sockets, for example: if a process on one side of a socket suddenly goes away, the peer just gets a stale socket.

This lack of resilience is not entirely the fault of MPI implementations; the MPI standard itself lacks some critical definitions about behavior when one or more processes die.

I talked to Joshua Hursey, Postdoctoral Research Associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a leading member of the MPI Forum’s Fault Tolerance Working Group to find out what is being done to make MPI more resilient.

Read More »

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