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What can the Public Sector Learn from the Best Corporate Innovation Strategies? – Part 2

In my previous post, I described the “culture of innovation,” for which Bay Area companies have become renowned. And we looked, briefly, at what it could mean for the public sector.

It may come as something of a surprise that Bay Area companies are no more likely to follow a Technology Drivers innovation model than companies located elsewhere. Like many top innovators, companies in the Bay Area have not only found success in creating ground-breaking technologies, but they are almost twice as likely as other companies to have developed the capabilities needed to provide a superior understanding of the stated and unstated needs of their end customers. It isn’t just about how many transistors you can fit on a chip.  It’s about how such advances can lead to products and services that gain traction in the marketplace through superior insight into, and understanding of, customers’ needs. Read More »

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What can the Public Sector Learn from the Best Corporate Innovation Strategies?

Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area are famous for their long history of leadership in computing, semiconductors, software, biotechnology, internetworking, and innovation-based industries. But what makes it unique, beyond the laboratories, talent base, and access to capital? And what exactly is this oft-cited “culture of innovation”?

Sean Randolph and his team at the Bay Area Council Economic Institute (BACEI) set out to find the answers. Read More »

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Economic Development, Biotech and Research Come Together for Innovation at BIO 2012

If you missed BIO 2012, you missed a lot.  The public and private sector came together this week on Boston to examine innovation opportunities to promote economic growth through collaborative research and development projects.  The event drew 16,505 industry leaders from 49 states and 65 countries.  Boston was host to universities, researchers, state, local and federal government economic development representatives, clinicians and private industries.  This was science at its best at a truly global event.  Discussions around where the biotech industry is going and how pharma is changing took center stage most of the week.

A positive trend was noted in a special state of bioscience development report that analyzes state and national biotech employment patterns. Despite job losses in the U.S. private sector, it showed that US biotech industry actually added jobs between 2001 and 2010.  Throughout the week multiple conversations and meetings took place discussing how the ability to collaborate was a key element to attracting biotech projects.  Many countries visited the Cisco booth to discover what they needed to do to create an infrastructure to welcome biotech development. How can governments work together with biotech companies to produce and atmosphere that welcomes and fosters innovation?

 

 

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Bruce Klein to Lead Worldwide Partner Organization

Last week, when we announced senior leadership changes within Cisco Services and APJC, we referenced additional planned changes that would demonstrate the incredible depth and breadth of Cisco’s leadership talent. Today, it is with mixed emotions that I announce Keith Goodwin, SVP Worldwide Partner Organization (WWPO), has decided to retire after 13 successful years with Cisco and 38 years in the IT industry. While Keith’s departure is a loss for all of us, I am excited to share that another outstanding leader, SVP Bruce Klein, will become the new leader of Cisco’s Worldwide Partner Organization. On another positive note, I am delighted to announce that Patrick Finn, SVP, Federal will lead the U.S. Public Sector theater.

Keith has been a tremendous colleague and a great friend to me and many of you. During his impactful career at Cisco, Keith has led WW Sales Operations, the Americas International Theater and for the last seven years WWPO. Keith has built the industry’s strongest partner leadership team including Edison Peres, Wendy Bahr and Andrew Sage.

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” Good Enough” Switching is not Good Enough for Public Sector Customers

March 1, 2012 at 1:03 pm PST

Public Sector customers continue to debate the trade-offs of prioritizing lowest price switching, point product solutions, over designing and deploying Cisco network architecture solutions which provide a lower Total Cost of Ownership (TCO).

On February 23, 2012, Deloitte Consulting presented the findings of an in-depth research study that examines the operational, financial, and risk factors associated with the use of single-vendor and multivendor approaches in different types of complex networks which may be viewed here along with the report itself.

They key findings are summarized in the following 7 items:

  1. Within the context of total IT spending, the use of single-vendor or multivendor architectures does not present material cost differences on a long-term basis. Initial cost savings realized in multivendor network implementations are mitigated by the incremental operating costs over the life of the equipment.
  2. Enterprise networks are considered critical production systems, key to business operations. Networks must be managed with an appropriate operational risk perspective.
  3. Customers prefer a single vendor to be responsible for all network components and services. The operational risk associated with network support, not the cost, is the primary factor when influencing the decisions to use single or multivendor architectures.
  4. Staffing costs are not significantly impacted by the use of multiple vendors; it is more influenced by the mix of functions supported and the types of network services provided.
  5. Using products from different vendors can bring down initial costs for certain products, but adds higher operating risk in service, support, and operational integration.
  6. The use of multiple networking vendors introduces additional operational risk based on the need for customers to assume increased risks for integration, interoperability and support.
  7. When using multiple vendors’ products, customers frequently do not recognize the interdependencies of functionality, long-term costs, and impact on operational risks

And be sure to watch Director of Public Sector Systems Engineering,  Dave West on youtube present his version of why low-cost, ” Good Enough” Switching is not Good Enough for Public Sector Customers looking for a reliable, secure, highly available, well supported and investment protected network.

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