Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Data Center and Cloud

Take One small step with the ACI Simulator, Make a giant leap in ACI Fabric deployments

Cisco ACI is gaining momentum and mindshare in the industry as testified by the 160 plus licensees for the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC), and 900 plus customers for the Nexus 9k platform.  All of this in less than three months since going live in August 2014.  Riding on that wave of success, we are pleased to announce the Cisco ACI Simulator, a physical appliance that provides a simulated Cisco ACI environment. The appliance is a full-featured Cisco APIC controller software along with a simulated fabric infrastructure of leaf switches and spine switches in one physical server.

If you wondered how it is going to help you, think of it as a self-contained environment with Cisco APIC instances with real production software. You can use it to quickly understand ACI features, exercise APIs, and initiate integration with third-party orchestration systems and applications. The ACI simulator will also allow you to use the native command line CLI and GUI via APIs that are available for third-parties.  If you are a developer or Cisco partner, this is an ideal way to develop and test your solution.  If you are a customer, you can use this in your test lab to create profiles for your enterprise apps with your actual application delivery controllers and security devices.  This belongs in any well-architected DevOps environment.

Topology of the simulator

The Cisco ACI Simulator enables you to simulate the Cisco ACI fabric, including the Cisco Nexus 9000 Series Switches supported in a leaf-and-spine topology, to take full advantage of an automated, policy-based, systems management approach. Specifically, the ACI simulator environment comprises 2 ACI spines, 2 ACI leafs, and 3 APIC controllers.

acisimulator

The Cisco ACI Simulator includes simulated switches, so you cannot validate the data path. However, some of the simulated switch ports are mapped to the front-panel server ports which allows you to connect external management entities such as VMware ESX servers, VMware vCenter, VMware vShield, and bare-metal servers; Layer 4 through 7 services; authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) systems; and other physical and virtual service appliances. In addition, the Cisco ACI Simulator allows simulation of faults and alerts to facilitate testing and demonstrate features.

Benefits/features

The ACI simulator provides a variety of features and benefits, key ones summarized in the table below.

Fabric Management Topology view, Fabric discovery
Creation of network constructs Build a tenant,  private layer 3 network, bridged   domain
Specify Cisco ACI policy constructs Create Filters, Contracts
Application deployment create Application Network Profiles, End-point groups
Virtualization Integration VMware ESXi, vCenter, vshield
L4-L7 services integration Cisco ASA/ASAv, Citrix NetScaler and F5 BIG-IP
Monitoring and troubleshooting View faults, events, managed objects etc through GUI
Programmability with Northbound API clients Python, REST APIS with JSON & XML bindings,   PowerShell etc

 

Additionally,  please refer to the Cisco ACI compatibility matrix for a full list of supported capabilities and the Datasheet for detailed specifications. In closing, I want to bring to your attention to the general availability of APIC release 1.0(2i) and Cisco NX-OS release 11.0(2i) for Cisco Nexus 9000 Series ACI-Mode Switches. This release delivers new hardware and software capabilities that will further the customer momentum we are seeing with ACI.

For more information, visit

www.cisco.com/go/aci

ACI simulator

https://blogs.cisco.com/datacenter

Tags: , , , , ,

Transform Service Provider Architectures to Support Virtualized Managed Business Services

October 9, 2014 at 11:35 am PST

ginaBy Gina Nienaber, Marketing Manager, SP Product and Solutions Marketing

Cisco estimates over 50 billion new devices will be connected to the Internet by 2020.  To support the Internet of Everything, service providers must undergo an infrastructure transformation.  The network needs to become more open, programmable, automated, adaptive, and agile.  To guide this transformation, the Cisco open network strategy for service providers is depicted as three interwoven layers:  the Evolved Programmable Network (physical and virtual network Infrastructure), the Evolved Services Platform (for orchestration of resources) and Applications and Services layer to enable virtualized services such as Cloud VPN and Security.  With these three layers working together, providers can begin to realize the benefits of an open network that is readily open to new devices, open for quickly enabling new services, and open to endless possibilities.

Last week, Cisco announced two Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Network Consulting Engineers: Evolving with Confidence

Network Certified Engineer

Network Consulting Engineer

Customers reach out to Cisco Services because they have confidence in our skills and abilities. One way we build that confidence for our customers—and for ourselves—is through certifications and specialization.

  • As we study for certifications, we gain confidence in our understanding and abilities to execute in our areas of study.
  • As we test our knowledge against known standards, we prove competency, which also improves our self-confidence.

As the networking industry evolves, the role of the Network Consulting Engineer (NCE) also must evolve. Gone are the days of configuring and managing a large-scale network via command-line interface. Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,

The Napkin Dialogues: Nexus Programmability, Part II

July 9, 2014 at 8:48 am PST

When last we left our hero, he (that is, me, or I) was getting a crash course in Nexus programmability and trying to understand what all of this stuff meant. I had plied Jim* with beer in order to get him to explain to me – using the available napkins in the bar – what the technology was, what it meant, and why I should care. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Napkin Dialogues: Nexus Programmability, Part I

June 30, 2014 at 12:08 pm PST

I know that I take a different approach to learning new things than most people. At least, I know my approach is different than the way people present them. The good news is that when I get something, I really get it. However, when looking at the juggernaut that is “Software-Defined X,” or even “programmability,” I know that I’m still a long, long way away from feeling like I have a handle on it.

When I wrote the previous blog post on some of the key “Open” terms were in programmability, I was overjoyed to find out that there were a few people who also had difficulty getting a grip on this too.

In other words, I’m not alone!

There is still a bewildering amount of information that I still need to learn, however, and it seems to me that if I resonated with a few people about these high-level topics, there are probably a few more who are curious about what lies beneath as well. Fortunately I work for a company (and with a lot of people) who have been willing to help me. Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,