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A New Generation of Cisco UCS Power Calculator

We are proud to announce the new Cisco UCS Power Calculator and Estimation Tool. It features an all new User Interface (UI) and is currently live at

The tool contains many new features, including the ability to create templates and projects where configuration data is stored. Templates and projects improve agility as well as enable collaboration among users through exporting and importing user-specific  configuration data.


Additionally, the new power calculator offers a powerful RESTful API, which allows third party applications to connect and generate power estimations by simply passing through actual configuration data.  This architecture provides a single source for all power estimates.


Common to the Cisco UCS management tool portfolio, the API-driven architecture for the new power calculator enables integration opportunities with a number of Cisco tools. One example is tighter integration with Cisco Commerce Workspace (CCW) power calculator widget – for real-time estimation of solution power while building out configurations.  Third-party, non-Cisco tools (e.g. DCIM) can also now connect directly to the power calculator and assist users with data center infrastructure planning. For questions on how to integrate your application with the new power calculator and estimation tool’s REST API, please contact Roy Zeighami or Jeffrey Metcalf at (

Previous versions of the Cisco UCS Power Calculator will be retired with redirects to the new Cisco UCS Power Calculator.

Cheers and Thanks! to Intel for the collaboration!

UCS Power Calculator:
UCS Communities:
UCS Platform Emulator:
UCS Developed Integrations:

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The Dirty Secrets of Server Power

Power efficiency remains a top decision point for many customers looking to modernize their data center. Customers searching for an accurate way to compare server power among vendors are often directed to use power calculators without taking into account the many factors that drive power utilization. This notion preys on the simplistic nature of the power beast – lower number is better… but are we missing the (power) bus entirely?

The dirty little secret is that there is no industry standard for power calculators, and vendors can essentially publish a calculator around whatever workload they like (or no actual workload at all). Read More »

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