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Cisco UCS Leads the Industry in Server Performance and Productivity

On April 5th, 2011, Cisco participated in the Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 Product Family Announcement with NINE new world record performance benchmark results highlighting the Cisco Unified Computing System’s outstanding performance and IT productivity across key data center workloads. Cisco also announced the broadening of its server portfolio with the introduction of the Cisco UCS C260 enterprise server, an Intel Xeon processor E7 family based platform designed for most data demanding business critical IT challenges. The Cisco Unified Computing System’s outstanding performance benchmark results are highlighted in the Intel® Xeon® processor E7 Family-based Platform Performance Highlights (April 5, 2011) announcement.

Fundamentally, this record setting performance further reinforces the Cisco Unified Computing System’s ability to deliver next generation compute across bare-metal, high performance computing (HPC) and in the most complex virtualization and cloud computing environments in the data center. Check out the Performance Brief for additional information on the nine new Cisco UCS world record benchmarks. The detailed benchmark disclosure reports are available here.

So the momentum continues…In two short years, the Cisco UCS has captured over 40 world records for performance and IT productivity taking its place among the most trusted server vendors on the market. Check out the Cisco Unified Computing System™ Performance Leadership Presentation.  

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Home page tune-up

February 15, 2011 at 6:53 am PST

It's a little thing, but over the past couple of weeks we've done some tuning up of the Cisco.com home page:

  • It loads faster
  • Menus and other interactive functions become active more quickly
  • A few tweaks for iPad users

Enjoy, and let us know what you think.

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Challenges in Deploying IP Video based Applications - Part 2: Performance

November 23, 2010 at 8:17 am PST

Video applications can be very sensitive to aspects of network performance. After the video has been packetized for IP transport, the network’s contribution to the video stream’s performance is generally limited to delay, jitter, and loss.

Delays arise from physical limits (speed of light) as well as queuing mechanisms in routers and gateways that the packets traverse along the way. When delay increases above 400 milliseconds (camera to display), people become aware of it and the delay starts to impede interactive communications.

Jitter is the variability of delay. Buffers can be used to smooth out variations in delay. However, too much buffering adds delay and prevents effective interactive video.

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