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Cisco Continues Enhancing Core Routing Capabilities

When Cisco announced the CRS (Carrier Routing System) in 2004, many analysts and other observers thought it overkill.   Some said that Cisco would not sell more than 50.

To date, the number is greater than 8000.

That would seem to fall into the category of “Exceeding Expectations”.

And just how did Cisco do this?  In part, by continually staying ahead of the game with enhancements – never waiting for traffic loads, customer demands or other circumstances to force it into catch-up mode.

Today, Cisco continued that practice with further enhancements to the industry-leading CRS platform.

Cisco announced that GTS Central Europe (GTS CE), a leading provider of integrated telecommunications solutions and data center services in Central and Eastern Europe, has deployed the CRS for its Next-Generation Internet core.  Cisco new elastic core networking capabilities enable service providers such as GTS CE to cost-effectively launch and scale revenue-generating services within minutes instead of months.  The solution includes the industry’s first integrated coherent 100 Gbps IP over DWDM and Cisco’s nLight™ technology for the CRS.

Cisco’s nLight technology converges IP and optical transport networks by introducing programmability to minimize network complexity while maximizing service intelligence and monetization opportunities.  This capability significantly reduces network total cost of ownership and is a key element of the Cisco Open Network Environment (ONE) framework. 

Also, in recent related news, Cisco and BT recently conducted a landmark 100G DWDM trial

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Cisco Optical Network System (ONS) listed on UC APL!

The Global Certification Team (GCT) is proud to announce the following additions to the Unified Capabilities Approved Products List (UC APL):

    • Cisco ONS 15310-Customer Location (CL) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023001, as a Fixed Network Element (F-NE).
      • The Cisco ONS 15310-CL SONET Multiservice Platform is an economical, 1-rack unit (1RU)-high delivery platform optimized for use as the last network element—at the customer location (CL)—in a service provider’s network, or for use as an end node in enterprise or campus environments. The Cisco ONS 15310-CL takes advantage of the proven technology pioneered by the Cisco ONS 15454, the industry’s first and leading multiservice optical transport platform.
    • Cisco ONS 15310-Metro Access (MA) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023002, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS15310-MA is a carrier-class MSPP that efficiently switches Ethernet and TDM traffic for use in metropolitan and regional optical networks. With the flexibility and scalability that allow it to support DS1, DS3/EC1, OC-3 to OC-48 SONET, and Ethernet interfaces, the ONS 15310-MA is already a part of many North American service providers multiservice SONET and next-generation “triple play” and IPTV deployment strategies.
    • Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Provisioning Platform (MSPP) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 1023003, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS 15454 SONET Multiservice Provisioning Platform (MSPP) provides the functions of multiple network elements in a single platform. It supports common interfaces such as DS-1, DS-3, and EC-1 and data solutions including 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet solutions with OC-3 through OC-192 optical transport bit rates and integrated DWDM wavelengths.
    • Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Transport Platform (MSTP) Rel. 9.2.1 TN 10230047, as a F-NE.
      • The Cisco ONS 15454 Multiservice Transport Platform (MSTP) is the most deployed metropolitan-area (metro) and regional dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) solution in the world featuring two- through eight-degree reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM) technology that enables wavelength provisioning across entire networks and eliminates the need for optical-to-electrical-to-optical (OEO) transponder conversions. The ONS 15454 MSTP interconnects with Layer-2, Layer-3 and storage area network (SAN) devices at rates up to 40 Gbps. It delivers any service type to any network location and supports all DWDM topologies.

 

The approval document is posted on the UC APL site at the following URL: https://aplits.disa.mil/processAPList.do

 

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Cisco Going the Distance . . . 3,000 km

 Cisco is really stretching it out when it comes to 100 Gigabit DWDM.

Today, Cisco announced successful demonstration and validation of its coherent 100 Gigabit (100G) DWDM solution exceeding 3,000 km in reach.  

Cisco is the first to deliver 100G at 3,000 km distances without the need for complex Raman optical amplification technology or signal regeneration signals.  This distance is 50-percent further than any non-Raman alternative solution on the market today.

What does this mean?  

Well, by eliminating the need for Raman amplification, regeneration and dispersion compensation, carriers can add 100G services on top of existing infrastructures originally designed for 10G technology.  That means better investment protection and a simpler network upgrade process.

The Cisco solution has been tested at a number of service providers and research networks, including US Signal. The performance was also validated by EANTC, the European Advanced Network Test Center.

For more detail, follow the live links embedded above.

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No Slowing for the Holidays

The end-of-year holiday season is traditionally positioned as a chance to slow down and re-charge, but Cisco’s industry-leading products for service providers didn’t get the memo.   Their momentum continued unabated.

Just two days before Christmas, Cisco announced that Dutch service provider KPN has chosen the Cisco CRS-3 multi-chassis carrier routing system, which will be deployed at the heart of KPN’s Internet peering network. The CRS-3 solution will transport all of KPN’s IP traffic to the Internet as part of KPN’s Internet Cluster Environment (ICE).

Not long before, Verizon announced that its IP network, one of the most advanced communications networks in the world, will be upgraded in the first half of 2012 with the Cisco CRS-3 to enable new services and meet growing traffic demands in several key U.S. markets, including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York and Seattle.

As for the ASR 9000 edge routing system, Fibrenoire, a service provider offering Internet and private network services over an optical fiber network in Quebec and Ontario, has completed implementation of an end-to-end Cisco Carrier Ethernet System covering the Quebec City, Montreal and Toronto regions. Fibrenoire’s network is based on the ASR 9000.

Additionally, Next Communications, a Miami-based voice and video provider, has deployed Cisco technology for its IP Next-Generation Network. Integral to this will be deployment of the ASR 9000 and ASR 1000 routers for 100GE port capacity and greater resiliency.

And a couple of other interesting news items:

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Paying Attention to TCO can save the Government Millions in Transport Costs

I’ve been thinking a lot about TCO recently and ways we can help the Government maximize the investment of our tax dollars. By chance, I ran across this incredible White Paper written by one of our top Optical Engineers  entitled “Government Transport Networks:  Minimize Lifetime Costs”.

It’s a good read, and if you are a Network Architect making purchasing decisions in this area, I would highly recommend it.  In fact, if you have any further questions on any of the data presented please reach out to me directly and I’ll put you in touch with the author.

This paper makes the case that transport networks represent a significant portion of government IT costs and is often overlooked in terms of TCO.  It guides the reader through the various Network Deployment Models (private, managed private, hybrid) and the benefits  in real dollars by going with one approach over another.

Transport networks affect government operational costs at least as much as campus or data center networks, and carefully selecting the platform can result in significant savings. In summary, a well-planned transport architecture can help agencies avoid the considerable expense of upgrades as they accelerate adoption of business video and virtualization. In contrast, a platform with lower upfront costs may have a shorter lifespan and require IT teams to continually add overlay networks that increase costs and management complexity.

So “caveat emptor” when considering your next network purchase.

To learn more about Cisco transport platforms, visit: http://www.cisco.com/go/optical.

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