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Open at Cisco is Moving!

Open at Cisco is moving to the Cisco Cloud blog!

Why?

We’re a big company, our employees are enthusiastic, and we’ve got a whole lot of innovative products and solutions.

These things are good. And generally they work in our favor. But when it comes to blogging–and blogging about the cloud in particular–they may have inadvertently made things confusing for customers.

In our collective eagerness to talk about our growing list of cloud offerings, emerging cloud strategies, and contributions to the cloud community, we all started blogging from different places. The data center folks were talking about Cisco’s cloud-optimized hardware on one blog, the open source enthusiasts were talking about OpenStack and the Metacloud acquisition on another (this one), and still other groups were discussing cloud security and cloud as it relates to SDN on other blogs.

Of course we weren’t all aware that it was going on at the time, but now that we are, we’re consolidating. From now on, if you’d like to know what Cisco is up to in the cloud (and believe me when I say that a very exciting story is unfolding), just go to the Cisco Cloud blog to find out. It’s located at http://blogs.cisco.com/cloud, and from here on out, it will be the only source you need to check for interesting insights into emerging cloud use cases, advances in cloud technology, cloud related events, and everything else Cisco is doing in the ever-changing cloud space.

Thank you for taking the time to read the posts on the Open at Cisco blog. We hope you’ve enjoyed it, and we look forward to continuing the dialogue at our new location!

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Why Compromise Your Public Cloud Experience?

Have you used a public cloud? The experience as a developer is truly fantastic. Enter your credit card information and go. Need more resources? Click. Tear down a server and start over? Click. Want APIs for granular access to configure and automate every part of your deployments exactly the way you need them? No problem. Built-in integration with the modern tools and platforms you’re using? Of course.

Traditional IT vs Cloud

Compare that to traditional infrastructure where it takes phone calls or tickets, approvals, and many different platforms that typically aren’t integrated just to get access to servers. Automation is difficult or impossible. Moving fast as a developer just isn’t something you can do. You spend your time wrangling the infrastructure instead of building your app.

The public cloud experience for a developer is liberating. It’s easy, fast, and predictable. It helps them deliver on their promises to the business by removing any obstacles to the resources they need.

Smart companies are freeing their development teams from traditional IT models and helping them move fast by taking advantage of cloud.

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Announcing the new Data Center and Cloud Community!

It’s finally here- the new Data Center and Cloud community framework has launched! We created new content spaces for Compute and Storage, Software Defined Networks, Data Center and Networking, and OpenStack and OpenSource Software.

communitydatacentercloud

Cisco Data Center and Cloud Community Infrastructure

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An Open Framework for Hosting Multi Data Center Distributed Applications on the Cisco Cloud

Authors
Ken Owens (@kenowens12), Keith Chambers (@keithchambers), and Jason Plank (@_japlank_)

Over the last few years, we’ve heard a lot about ways of designing new software applications. Out of this, we’ve heard a lot about “Microservice Architecture” as a way to design these applications as individual components to make up an actual application. Refer back to this recent blog regarding the impact of microservices and containers on application enablement for the enterprise. Many attempts to define the architecture were undertaken, and in general the complexities of software platform and different viewpoints on the underlying components necessary have not resulted in an agreed solution.

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Scaling OpenStack L3 using Cisco ASR1K platform

Cisco has developed a plug-in to integrate the ASR 1000 Series Router (ASR1K) into OpenStack to offload L3 capabilities on to dedicated routing hardware.  The plug-in was demonstrated at Cisco Live in a Proof-of-Concept environment. We are planning demos of a Cloud solution based on the ASR1k plug-in at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. The plug-in is considered open source and will be submitted upstreamed into OpenStack. It will also be available from Cisco’s Neutron Tech-Preview repository for Juno.
OpenStack offers a reference software implementation for Layer 3 functionality. Routing, static NAT (Floating IPs) and dynamic NAT/SNAT (VM “Internet” access) are handled by the l3agent that runs part of the neutron component. The L3 agent relies on Linux IP Tables to define forwarding rules. With that comes a critical scalability issue as Linux IPTables has inherent scaling shortcomings. For highly-scalable clouds with many route and NAT operations, this becomes a serious bottleneck.
Cisco offers the ASR1K routing platform to be used in Data Centers typically for WAN edge operations. It performs NAT and L3 forwarding in hardware and provides L3 high-availability (HSRP). The ASR Config Agent builds upon the same technology utilized for the integration of the Cisco Cloud Services Router (CSR1000v) into OpenStack.

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