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OpenStack with ACI whiteboard Video illustrations by Lucien Avramov

According to Gartner’s Andrew Lerner, many of the networking practitioners running mainstream corporate networks have only surface-level knowledge of OpenStack as evidenced in his recent blog. To assist networkers to understand Openstack, we created an easy white-board style video illustration of OpenStack for beginners with specific use-cases, featuring networking in a Cisco ACI context.  Lucien Avramov  from Cisco’s Insieme Business Unit, a lead Technical Marketing Engineer and an OpenStack evangelist  gleefully signed up to do the Videos. In this blog, I am pleased to present highlights of the videos.

Lucien rightfully starts his white-board Videos with one that discusses the basics, namely “What is OpenStack and Networking”.

videoluciena

This video covers OpenStack and Networking. Lucien does a deep-dive into the Neutron project and explains Neutron basics and its interaction with the physical and virtual networks of a Data Center.

For OpenStack with Networking watch

The last video covers the benefits of ACI with OpenStack.  In this Video Lucien describes the workflow between ACI and OpenStack. You will learn the benefits of ACI with OpenStack including the ACI policy model, physical and virtual environment integration, hardware tunnels, service chaining and telemetry such as health scores, troubleshooting and visibility.

videolucien2

For ACI with OpenStack Video click, http://youtu.be/pQXysWvCPRQ

Stay tuned for more advanced video based use-case illustrations of OpenStack with ACI in near future.

Relevant Links

www.cisco.com/go/aci

www.cisco.com/go/nexus9000

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OpenStack Gains Momentum with Users at Recent Summit

Cisco highlighted its support for OpenStack at the recent OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, which hosted 4500+ attendees and included many more users, in addition to the developers and operators that have dominated past conferences.  A common theme among keynote presentations was the speed and flexibility of IT required to support the clouds that will soon dominate commerce and communication worldwide.  The effort underway to improve stability was also a recurring discussion topic.

OpenStack Summit, May 12-15 in Atlanta

OpenStack Summit, May 12-15 in Atlanta

From its beginning as an open source project at NASA, the OpenStack movement has grown as an open alternative to propriety cloud services and applications.  The Summit serves as a forum for those interested in hashing out the direction and adoption of the model and standards, as well as a learning opportunity for those ready to build and deploy on them.

Keynote speakers from Wells Fargo and Disney helped transition the Summit from an academic exercise to a forum for learning how innovative companies are taking control of their cloud environments.

Glenn Ferguson, Head of Private Cloud Enablement for Wells Fargo, described the compliance, auditing and governance Wells requires in its private cloud, that aren’t available in public cloud offerings.  Wells has designated OpenStack their “cloud infrastructure model” to facilitate rapid deployment of infrastructure to meet application developers’ needs and requires all IT vendors to work within the OpenStack specifications. “This is something we have to do to remain agile and competitive in this environment,” Ferguson said.  “Our infrastructure needs to keep pace with the software.”

Chris Launey, Disney’s Director of Cloud Architectures and Services, was blunt in how he described the value of speed.  “If you’re a business that deals in any kind of information, you need speed (to thrive.)  “If you give (developers) their own ‘fast’, they’ll make their own ‘cheap’ by getting their product to market quickly and responding to customer demands.  And (they’ll) make their own ‘good’ by shrinking development cycles and introducing improvements more often, until they reach a virtual continuous cycle of improvements.”

The OpenStack Foundation divides the work into individual projects focused on the various cloud components: servers, object-based storage, networking infrastructure, security, etc.  Proponents are excited about the innovation that can be unleashed when developers are freed from having to worry about the complexities associated with underlying infrastructure and can focus on the innovation of cloud services and applications.

Cisco was highly visible at the Summit, drawing standing-room-only crowds to sessions in the Networking Track,  as network stability and scalability are top-of-mind for users deploying critical applications and services to an open source cloud.

Lew Tucker, Cisco Vice President and CTO for Cloud Computing and Vice-Chair of the OpenStack Foundation, painted a picture of what is possible in his presentation “Open Stack and the Transformation of the Data Center.”  He described how the data center is becoming a large, highly automated “fabric” consisting of interconnected physical systems and virtualized services.  In this environment, OpenStack acts as a platform for building a highly efficient cloud, providing management of diverse infrastructure “below” and orchestration of a vast set of application services “above”.

Lew Tucker, Cisco VP and CTO of Cloud Computing

Lew Tucker, Cisco VP and CTO of Cloud Computing

Cisco’s key contribution to OpenStack has been participation in the development of Neutron, the OpenStack Networking Service.  There is clearly a need to have the same level of visibility and management flexibility that Cisco has been offering its customers in an open source cloud model.  In addition to driving connectivity generally, Cisco has received approval on blueprints for plugins to integrate VPN- and Firewall-as-a-Service as part of OpenStack networking.  (Referred to as Network Function Virtualization (NFV) plugins.)  Cisco is also working on the integration of OpenStack Neutron with OpenDaylight, a separate project started to focus specifically on network programmability.  Cisco’s extensive work in the open source community will bring even greater value to its existing customers by extending the ecosystem of solutions integrated with Cisco products.

In the Expo Hall, Cisco highlighted the integration of its networking, compute and management products with OpenStack APIs, demonstrating:

If you missed the Summit, check out the Session Videos and Slides to deep-dive presentations by Cisco contributors, presented at the Atlanta Summit 2014:

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#EngineersUnplugged S5|Ep12: OpenStack 101

May 28, 2014 at 11:22 am PST

In this week’s episode of Engineers Unplugged, Mike Dennard and Edgar Magana discuss OpenStack 101. Wondering what Cisco is working on for OpenStack? This is the episode for you.

This is Engineers Unplugged, where technologists talk to each other the way they know best, with a whiteboard. The rules are simple:

  1. Episodes will publish weekly (or as close to it as we can manage)
  2. Subscribe to the podcast here: engineersunplugged.com
  3. Follow the #engineersunplugged conversation on Twitter
  4. Submit ideas for episodes or volunteer to appear by Tweeting to @CommsNinja
  5. Practice drawing unicorns

Join the behind the scenes by liking Engineers Unplugged on Facebook.

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Thoughts on #OpenStack and Software-Defined Storage

May 14, 2014 at 6:18 am PST

This week has been the semi-annual OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA. In a rare occurrence I’ve been able to be here as an attendee, which has given me wide insight into a world of Open Source development I rarely get to see outside of some interpersonal conversations with DevOps people. (If you’re not sure what OpenStack is, or what the difference is between it and OpenFlow, OpenDaylight, etc., you may want to read an earlier blog I wrote that explains it in plain English).

On the first day of the conference there was an “Ask the Experts” session based upon storage. Since i’ve been trying to work my way into this world of Programmability via my experience with storage and storage networking, I figured it would be an excellent place to start. Also, it was the first session of the conference.

During the course of the Q&A, John Griffith, the Program Technical Lead (PTL) of the Cinder project (Cinder is the name of the core project within OpenStack that deals with block storage) happened to mention that he believed that Cinder represented software-defined storage as a practical application of the concept.

I’m afraid I have to respectfully disagree. At least, I would hesitate to give it that kind of association yet. Read More »

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Openstack Expectations for Summit

Openstack SummitAs I was flying to Atlanta for Openstack Summit, I was thinking about the difference in my expectations for this summit from the summit last year in Portland.

In Portland, Havana was just released and was starting to become interesting to service providers as the project was maturing and gaining interest with some enterprises. The Havana release was not ready for enterprises but Icehouse, the next release was bringing features that are of great interest. I was interested in getting involved in Icehouse so I attended with my R&D team and networked. There was not much excitement at the event and the attendance was not that great. Walking into the exhibit hall was depressing as there were only a small number of exhibits and mostly tables with brochures.

One year later, and the excitement around Openstack and Icehouse is high. Openstack has finally hit the feature capability and scale requirements needed to be accepted by the enterprise. Over the last year, numerous enterprises performed Proof of Concepts (PoCs) on Havana and 2014 is quickly becoming the year of Openstack coming out! The Icehouse features that are of greatest interest are:

  • Ceilometer support in Horizon for administrators to view daily usage reports per project across services.
  • Keystone now enables federated authentication via Shibboleth for multiple Identity Providers, and mapping federated attributes into OpenStack group-based role assignments 
  • Keystone assignment backed is completely separate from the identity backend. This allows much greater flexibility in which data comes from where. This allows an enterprise back your deployment’s identity data to LDAP, and your authorization data to RSA for instance.
  • Token KVS driver is now capable of writing to persistent Key-Value stores such as Redis, Cassandra, or MongoDB. In combination with above, this means we can use Redis or Cassandra for tokens and LDAP for user/pass/domain/etc.
  • Notifications  are now emitted in response to create, update and delete events on roles, groups, and trusts.
  • LDAP driver for the assignment backend now supports group-based role assignment operations.
  • Ceilometer API now gives direct access to samples decoupled from a specific meter events API, in the style of StackTach 
  • New Metric sources, including Neutron north-bound API on SDN controller, VMware vCenter Server API, SNMP daemons on bare metal hosts and OpenDaylight REST APIs    [ Check also Mike Cohen’s blog  Delivering Policy in the Age of OpenSource  ]

For the full set of features, please refer to: https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/ReleaseNotes/Icehouse

I’m really looking forward to the Summit in Atlanta and will be spending most of my time in the Juno Design Summit contributing to Heat, Ceilometer, and Solum.

You can also follow me on Twitter @kenowens12

 

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