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BYOD: Beyond the Triple Play

By Ross Fujii, CTO of Cisco Network Management Technology Group (NMTG)

Service providers have already penetrated the connected home network with equipment such as set-top boxes and Internet gateway routers to provide Triple Play services – voice, video, and data.  From this established base, Service providers have the opportunity to further extend into quad and quintuple plays by offering additional services such as wireless/cellular and security-based/home automation.  In fact, with the right infrastructure, the connected home network becomes extremely flexible and capable of supporting a wide range of new and innovative services.  Service providers are the natural candidate to offer – and capitalize upon – these services.

The key to generating more than just Triple Play revenues is visibility into the home network.  Effectively, Service providers need to push the edge of their networks further into the connected home.  In this way, they can enable the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) reality by: Read More »

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BYOD: What Businesses Need

By Ross Fujii, CTO of Cisco Network Management Technology Group (NMTG)

Bring Own Your Device (BYOD) in the context of the business world reflects the fact that many consumers bring their work home with them.  Specifically, they connect devices they have received as part of their job – laptops, smartphones, and tablets – to the home network and use them as they would at the workplace.

While the added productivity of BYOD and working at home is attractive to businesses, the risk of exposure is not.  Laptops, for example, can store or access sensitive data like financial information or critical trade secrets that need to be protected.  In some cases, such as personal or health data, the law requires that this information must be secured.

The reality is that it is not always possible to ensure that a device is secure.  As a consequence, Read More »

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BYOD: What Consumers Want

By Ross Fujii, CTO of Cisco Network Management Technology Group (NMTG)

Before exploring how service providers can capitalize upon the opportunities that Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) offers, it is critical to understand what consumers actually need and want from their home network.  A few usage scenarios will illustrate the key characteristics of the next-generation connected home:

  • You’re watching the news on your smartphone as you take a walk around the neighborhood.  When you get home, you pause the video stream and resume it on your IPTV in the comfort of your living room couch.
  • You’ve heard about a new TV show you want to check out.  You have no idea whether Read More »

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BYOD: The Changing Topology of the Connected Home Network

By Ross Fujii, CTO of Cisco Network Management Technology Group (NMTG)

BYOD – Bring Your Own Device – is a catch-phrase capturing the idea that consumers are bringing more and more devices into the connected home network.  It is no longer just the early adopters who have non-PC devices they want to use while at home.  There has been a literal explosion of electronic devices that consumers want to share content and data across – smartphones, tablets, IPTVs, network-attached storage (NAS), and even game consoles.  Each of these devices generates different types of traffic and consumes content in completely different ways.  The number of new usage scenarios to support is daunting.

BYOD also refers to the idea that people want to be able to bring and use their own devices in other people’s homes.  If you want to look something up on the Internet, for example, you don’t want to have to borrow your friend’s phone to do so.  You want to do it on your own device.  Similarly, today’s Read More »

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Why TCO is the Only True Way to Measure Network Costs

Cost always plays a big part in purchase decisions. It’s certainly a factor as I consider buying  a new car. As you’re well aware, purchasing a new car isn’t just about the initial cost. In my case, I’m considering reliability, speed (not that I need to go that fast carpooling my kids to school), mileage, and looks to a certain extent. (I just can’t bring myself to drive a minivan.) But what does buying a car have to do with your customers, or IT spending for that matter?

To put it simply, customers often cite initial cost as a big factor in their network decision-making, too. But if they are looking only at CapEx when purchasing new equipment, it’s the same thing as only looking at the initial cost of a car: They’re not seeing the entire picture.

Total cost of ownership, or TCO, is a better metric to assess network cost, because it considers the full impact on IT spend, including CapEx, services, labor, bandwidth, and energy consumption. And TCO is not just a measure of the initial expense, but of how much equipment will cost over its lifetime.

In June 2011, Cisco commissioned a third-party business consulting firm to analyze the true TCO of the network, comparing the quantitative costs of acquisition, support, labor, bandwidth, energy, and product longevity. The firm also assessed qualitative business benefits like network uptime, user productivity, and security.

The quantitative results alone show that a network built on Cisco’s architectural approach can yield up to a 13% better TCO, building a powerful business case for you to take to your customers about why the choice of networking gear matters.

Here are some facts drawn from the findings, which support Cisco’s firm belief that a strategic next-generation Cisco network architecture delivers superior value and lower TCO: Read More »

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