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Indoor Wi-Fi Location and Beacons: Better Together Part 2

wifibeaconLocation-based services have been getting a lot of attention lately and people are increasingly curious about how Wi-Fi and beacons play together in the hot space that is indoor location technology. In my last blog I reviewed how beacons work and how to differentiate when to use Wi-Fi and beacons. There’ve been some great questions about beacon technology and how it complements Cisco’s location-based Connected Mobile Experiences (CMX) solution, so I want to follow up on these topics with everyone.

What types of beacons are there?

Generally, there are two different classes of beacons: transmit only and backhaul enabled.

Transmit only beacons are exactly as they sound -- they simply transmit information to anyone that is capable of hearing (bluetooth enabled smartphones). They do not receive or pass any data or information upstream.

Apple’s iBeacon is the best example of this type of BLE beacon. You can think of them like the navigational beacons used by airplanes when on approach to major airports. The beacon doesn’t even know the plane is there, but the plane is aware of the beacon and knows where the beacon is allowing it to take the correct action. Same is true for smartphones and transmit only beacons like iBeacon -- the intelligence is located in the mobile application which must recognize the beacon and take appropriate action.

Backhaul enabled beacons generally include a Wi-Fi chipset for either management or data capabilities. Some backhaul enabled beacons are USB enabled and take advantage of whatever connectivity exists within the PC they are connected. Read More »

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Mobile Technology Spotlight: Mobile Phone Microscopes for the Developing World

Aydogan Ozcan_IMAGEThis is a guest blog contributed by Dr. Aydogan Ozcan, Chancellor’s Professor at UCLA. **

In many developing regions today, cellphones and other mobile devices have begun to play a significant role in healthcare distribution. Local networks operated by service providers allow medical staff to utilize mobile technology to treat, educate, and set follow-up appointment dates with patients. Not only can patients access information about their health, but they can meet with physicians via video over the mobile network. For regions where people may be hundreds or even thousands of miles from a local doctor or hospital, these mobile devices can become lifesaving tools.

While cell phones and other mobile devices such as PCs and tablets can serve as a source of medical information or as a virtual meeting place between a doctor and patient, the technology itself can play a more important role of improving health care in developing regions as an actual medical device. Take for example, the work of University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Chancellor’s Professor, Dr. Aydogan Ozcan. Ozcan is creating portable and lightweight microscopes that affix to the mobile phones, thus transforming them into a platform for conducting microanalysis of blood, bodily fluids and water samples. With Dr. Ozcan’s vision and technology research, cellphones can become a mobile medical lab that can diagnose life-threatening diseases.

Mobile Technology Saves Lives

According to Cisco’s Visual Networking Index, by the end of 2014, the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth, and by 2018 there will be nearly 1.4 mobile devices per capita. The massive volume of mobile phone users drives the rapid improvements of the hardware, software and high-end imaging and sensing technologies embedded in our phones, transforming the mobile phone into a cost-effective and yet extremely powerful platform to run biomedical tests and perform scientific measurements that would normally require advanced laboratory instruments. In addition to their massive volume, cost-effectiveness, coverage and data connectivity, rapid improvements in cellphone related technologies and components over the last decade provide important insights into some of the unique capabilities that our cellphones currently have. One of the most interesting components rapidly advancing on cell phones is the optoelectronic image sensor.

The mega-pixel count of cellphone cameras has been doubling almost every two years over the last decade. These advanced optical imagers on our cellphones provide various opportunities to utilize the cellphone as a general purpose microscope that can even detect single viruses on a chip. Microscopy is one of the most widely used tools in sciences, engineering and medicine, and the creation of high-end optical microscopy and imaging platforms that are integrated into cellphones is rather important for not only telemedicine (e.g., telepathology, remote diagnostics), mobile health, and environmental monitoring applications, but also for the democratization of measurement science and higher education.

Besides microscopy, these advanced imaging and optoelectronic or electronic sensing/sampling technologies embedded in cellphones can also be utilized for various telemedicine, and mobile health-related applications including, blood analysis and cytometry, detection of bacteria or viruses and diagnosis of infectious diseases.

Big Data for Service Providers

Mobile phone based field-portable measurement tools are also digitally connected to each other, forming a rapidly expanding network. Based on the advances in the broad use of cellphones for micro-analysis, imaging, and sensing, within the next decades, we can expect several orders of magnitude increase in the number of personal microscope and diagnostic tool users globally. All of these cost-effective and ubiquitous cellphone enabled devices designed for field portable imaging, sensing and testing would generate high quality, sensitive and specific data from wherever they are being used, forming a global network. In addition to mobile phones, other emerging consumer electronics devices – especially wearable computers such as Google Glass, Samsung Smartwatch and others – might also play important roles in the future practices and designs of next-generation mobile health, telemedicine and POC tools.

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Mobile phones will change the way that imaging, sensing and diagnostic measurements/tests are conducted, fundamentally impacting the existing practices in medicine, engineering and sciences, while also creating new ones. This transformation will also democratize high-end measurement and testing tools worldwide, which might significantly improve research and education institutions, especially in developing regions.

As the world becomes increasingly mobile, service providers have a unique opportunity to use their core technology and business assets to create new solutions and services to enhance their users’ experience and utility, reshape businesses and business models, and create new sources of value beyond their core access business.

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**Dr. Aydogan Ozcan is the Chancellor’s Professor at UCLA leading the Bio- and Nano-Photonics Laboratory at the Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments.

Dr. Ozcan holds 22 issued patents (all of which are licensed) and >15 pending patent applications and is also the author of one book and the co-author of more than 350 peer reviewed research articles in major scientific journals and conferences. Dr. Ozcan is a Fellow of SPIE and OSA, and has received major awards including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), SPIE Biophotonics Technology Innovator Award, SPIE Early Career Achievement Award, ARO Young Investigator Award, NSF CAREER Award, NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, ONR Young Investigator Award, IEEE Photonics Society Young Investigator Award and MIT’s TR35 Award for his seminal contributions to near-field and on-chip imaging, and telemedicine based diagnostics.

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Latin America Insights: Keeping Your Organization Safe in a Mobile World

The power of mobility has transformed the IT landscape.

While mobility and other tech forces, such as cloud and big data, have enabled organizations to improve productivity and increase efficiency, the constant challenge of keeping data, assets and users secure continues to be a top concern for CIOs and CSOs.

And these concerns stretch across global borders. For example, Frost & Sullivan analysts predict a $1.1B investment towards IT security in Latin America by 2015.

Today, security is no longer an expense, but a necessity for moving forward. It’s an investment for the future longevity of any company. With this in mind, how can business and IT leaders keep their organizations safe in a mobile world? And what can we learn from the mobile security adoption we are seeing in Latin America?

Recently, I had a chance to participate in a new Future of Mobility podcast with Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst, Bruno Tasco, to discuss the answers to some of these questions and how organizational leaders can address security in a way to reap the benefits of true mobility. The podcast is available for download in Spanish and Portuguese and a summary in English can be found on iTunes.

Here are a couple of considerations for CIOs and CSOs as they evaluate their mobile security strategies and look to future-proof their business.

Prepare for Fast Changes

Talking about mobility or general mobility in our Latin America market is like talking about the past. According to the Cisco Visual Networking Index (VNI), Latin America is experiencing and will continue to see incredible mobile adoption. Read More »

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Behind the WiFi Network @ Mobile World Congress 2014: Setting the Stage

Every year a new attendance record is set at Mobile World Congress by networkers participating from over 200 countries across the globe. This grand attendance of industry-defining vendors, technology enthusiasts and exhibitors triggers an explosive growth in the number of Wi-Fi capable devices being brought to the event. For MWC 2014, Cisco partnered with Fira Gran Via and GSMA to pull off one of the most successful high density Wi-Fi network deployments in the history of global tech events. This blog kicks off a series to provide a glimpse of behind the network, into the design stages, and the course of actions undertaken to implement a robust high density wireless network which served more than 22,000 concurrently connected unique devices and a total of 80,880 devices throughout the event. Full details in whitepaper here.

Setting the Scene

Divided into eight massive exhibition halls, Fira Gran Via covers around 3 million square feet (280,000 square meters) of area which also includes outdoor areas, restaurants, conference rooms, network lounges and a continuous elevated walkway flowing through the entire venue. Higher the environmental complexity, the more fun and challenging it is to achieve the right wireless design for a pervasive network that meets all the needs.

An aerial view of Mobile World Congress 2014 arena at Fira Gran Via, Barcelona

An aerial view of Mobile World Congress 2014 arena at Fira Gran Via, Barcelona

Generally, the physical design of large convention and exhibition halls bear an impish knack of unfavorable conditions for a ubiquitous high density Wi-Fi network, owing mostly to the lofty ceiling heights and construction components. Read More »

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Not All 802.11ac AP’s are Created Equal: Demand the Full Story

It’s always interesting and often entertaining to observe how competitors promote their products and what they choose to focus on—and more importantly, what they choose not to focus on and what they hope people won’t ask questions about.

Consider yet again how a competitor chooses to position their “purpose built” AP vs. the Cisco Aironet 3700 802.11ac Access Point Series.

This competitor frequently (and somewhat obsessively) points out that its 802.11ac AP has dual “active” 800 MHz cores while the Cisco AP3700 has only one “active” 800 MHz core. This is not completely true since it completely overlooks the fact that the Cisco AP3700 also has a dedicated CPU core and DSP for each radio subsystem.

Furthermore, it also overlooks that the dual “active” cores in the competitor’s AP share 512 MB of DRAM. The single “active” core of the AP3700 has dedicated 512 MB of DRAM. Also each radio subsystem has a dedicated 128 MB DRAM (for 768 MB total DRAM in the AP3700).

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Why is all of this important? Read More »

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