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Cookbook For BYOD & Virtualization in Schools: “Teaching 24 X 7…”

Special guest interview with Charlie Kanavel, CEO of The Kanavel Group; former Director, Technology, Campbell Union High School District – Campbell, CA

Mr. Kanavel is CEO of The Kanavel Group, a consulting and services firm focused on technology in government and education. The Kanavel Group specializes in taking clients from “WOW” to “HOW”, merging cutting edge technology with its clients long term strategic objectives.

As the Director of Technology at Campbell Union High School District, he was responsible for notable projects in California and the nation:  through the development of on-line hybrid courses using Cisco WebEx, he was the first to deploy them in the California K-12 education space. Working with Sony Corporation, he was the first to pilot Sony eReaders to replace textbooks in K-12 education nationwide.  Mr. Kanavel was also awarded Honorable Mention at Citrix Synergy 2010 for deploying virtualization in education. Formerly Mr. Kanavel distinguished himself in IT and compliance leadership in financial markets worldwide.

Charlie, welcome, and thanks for joining us. In K-12 today, the #1 issue is BYOD. Unlike a full 1:1 rollout where every child gets the same device, under BYOD how do superintendents & IT leaders address the equity divide among students so we ensure all have equal access to the same content?

Thank you for having me join today, Frank. I think for the past 10 years we in education have done a lot to bring technology in education forward into the on-line world. However, we have also made educational resources inside and outside the classroom very broadband and computer-centric. So to have full access to the resources made available by most schools today, you need a computer at home. This digital divide is very real in today’s schools and BYOD as a strategy gives districts a real way to solve this problem.

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“What If” Could Be Now: Truly Mobile Healthcare

Once upon a time in the days of Opie and Andy, doctors made house calls. I’ve seen it on TV, so it must be true. Now, a doctor visit usually requires that you do the visiting to a clinic, office, or hospital. An initial appointment may result in referrals for tests or to specialists – more visits, parking lots, waiting rooms. Sometimes your information gets transferred along, sometimes it doesn’t.

Mobile devices are showing up everywhere, healthcare included. There’s even a new word: mHealth. (We had e-everything in the early 2000s, then came along iSomething, so let’s now move further into the alphabet with mWords.) Read More »

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Revving for the Mobility Race

A few days before Mobile World Congress, the world’s elite Formula 1 teams tested their cars and skills at the Circuit de Catalunya in Barcelona. F-1 racing is a thrilling blend of courage, precision, technology, and teamwork: the same things service providers use to compete in the race to deploy seamless, profitable mobility services.

This year was my first time at Mobile World Congress, and I got a rush from it as if I were driving an F-1. Cisco CEO John Chambers set the pace for the event, saying, “We are now entering the post-macrocell era, where small cells also will play a critical role in delivering the next generation mobile Internet.”

As part of this shift, Cisco extends its M.O.VE reference architecture for service provider mobility with two major announcements at the show. We announced the industry’s first standards-based small cell solution, providing coverage and capacity solutions built off Wi-Fi and Femto technologies.  Read More »

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“What If” Could Be Now: A New Retail Experience

Consider me a weekend warrior of the DIY home-improvement world. My projects are likely laughable (in scope and outcome) in the eyes of the professionals, but if that’s the case, they’re not invited to my next barbeque. So there.

Granted, I sometimes experience delusions of grandeur as I envision transforming my fixer-upper into a quaint Sunset magazine-worthy before/after feature. Norm Abram will never worry about me usurping his reputation, but I like fixing things when they break and looking at something I’ve improved and knowing I did it.

I can swing a hammer and even use a tile saw, but most projects involve a lot of learning and asking questions along the way. Sometimes that’s a bit of a process – finding the answers I need or the people who have them. Read More »

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Evolving Beyond the PC

For at least the past two decades, knowledge workers have been firmly rooted in the PC era. Within enterprises of all sizes, that meant that the predominant operating system on the desktop – and often in the data center — was Windows.

We had unprecedented productivity gains during this time, no doubt, but I would now firmly assert that as Ray Ozzie suggested — and Steve Jobs was more than happy to reinforce — that we are transitioning to an era where PCs play a secondary role, if at all – this is the Post PC era. 

I believe we will now have more access to more information on more devices from more applications than ever before.

It’s not as if PCs are going away, so what do we mean by the “Post-PC Era”? PCs have their place. They’re still useful business tools. But it’s clear: We are rapidly evolving from a predominantly client-server world to one in which the Windows PC is just another device in a broad list of options.

We now have many choices in devices – even the option to perform the same tasks on different devices depending on our preferences at different times. Everything is anchored by persistent services that enable device portability and mobility

Once upon a time, I dreaded having to replace my mobile phone or PC. The transition invariably brought with it lost data, lost time, lost sanity… But I can now upgrade from one device to another fairly quickly without breaking much of a sweat. And I really need that ability if I want to keep up with the latest advances in technology.

Why is that? Because it’s cloud-enabled!

Although they’ve performed well for over two decades, traditional business tools and infrastructure based around the desktop PC and office-productivity software no longer exclusively fit the modern knowledge worker nor the global distributed form of 21st century work.

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