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Tablets Welcomed. Won’t BYOD increase my device troubleshooting costs?

Each year a considerable part (up to 30% in some cases) of IT budgets is funneled towards device troubleshooting. It is no surprise therefore that after security, maintaining lean operational efficiency is the next most frequent concern regarding enabling a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) model.

Suppose you have allowed personal devices to connect on your corporate network, and you get a helpdesk call from a disgruntled employee that can’t access certain resources. How would you go about addressing the issue? In this video, Saurabh Bhasin, Product Manager of the Cisco Prime Network Control System (NCS) – a newly launched platform for unified wired and wireless network management – answers the troubleshooting question.

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Tablets Welcomed: Addressing the top BYOD concern. Security.

Allowing personal devices on the corporate network can make any IT professional cringe. Security is naturally a top concern – and the topic of today’s blog.

One dimension of security is about enabling network access. To do that properly, you would need to design and enforce a mobile device access policy, which may include attributes such as: what the device is, who the user is, where and when access is requested, and the health (posture) of the device. Another dimension of security is about maintaining overall device integrity regardless of the network (corporate or otherwise) it connects to.

In this video we only address the first. Cisco’s solution is based on a newly launched product, the Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE). Watch the video to learn:

  • What is the Cisco ISE?
  • Can I treat corporate devices differently from personal ones?
  • What about guests in the organization, do I need a separate system?

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Tablets Welcomed: How Cisco IT created a mobile access policy for any device

Hope you found last week’s inaugural blog on the “Tablet Welcomed.” series interesting enough to come back.

Today, I am sitting down for an interview with Brett Belding, who was instrumental in designing a mobile device access policy for Cisco, in his role as the Senior Manager of IT.

I met Brett over Cisco Telepresence one early morning (when I typically I am still asleep, let alone in the office) to accommodate his Eastern time zone schedule. For the videophile readers, I should say that I pointed my camera directly to the Telepresence screen, which is why you may notice my reflection at certain points. However, this amateur video alone could be a case study for the quality of Cisco Telepresence.

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Tablets Welcomed: Part 1

Eighteen months ago, when the original Apple iPad was announced, I posted a blog here posing a simple question: “Apple iPad, in the enterprise?”  The obvious answer, to me at least, was a resounding “Yes”. Today, it seems that professionals and employers alike would agree. The former like to bring and operate their own devices at work, and the latter are buying these devices to boost employee productivity.

In this six-part blog series titled “Tablets Welcomed.” I will be posting short video clips (3 questions in 3 minutes) of interviews with Cisco leaders, that walk you through the Cisco solution for providing access to any device, securely, reliably, and seamlessly.

Today, I am talking to Tom Wilburn, Vice President of Sales for Cisco Wireless, who has experienced this market transition firsthand. Watch Tom here as he answers:
–    How has the influx of new mobile devices changed IT?
–    What are the consequences companies need to confront?
–    What are some compelling tablet use cases?

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Why no Wi-Fi at Fenway? – Missed Opportunity to Show Off

It is true I have become so dependent on having wireless access everywhere, that when I don’t have it I feel completely disconnected and no longer know how to socialize with my friends. Last Sunday I went to my beloved Fenway Park, one of the oldest baseball parks in America, and its age is showing.

Let me explain. For Father’s day I took my two-year-old son to Fenway Park for the first time, a pinnacle in any Boston Father’s life. To my surprise the opening ceremony included the new “Stanley Cup Champion Boston Bruins” driving around the park in the locally famous “Duck boats”. A Duck Boat is an amphibious vehicle used to tour Boston on the road and in the Charles River. But over the last 11 years their secondary purpose has been to support the parades of Boston and New England’s championship teams.

Now one thing you need to know is I am NOT a Hockey fan, but I have several friends who live and die by the Boston Bruins. Many of them went to the celebration parade the day before and couldn’t get closer than 20 yards from the Stanley cup. And here I was about 15 feet from it. Here is my view.

So there I am with my phone snapping pictures away and generating some really thought provoking e-mails about how my friends are missing out on an opportunity of a lifetime and I WAS THERE!!!

I sat in the stands, expecting the jealous responses I was bound to get (some not fit for publication!), but one thing stood in my way. Poor cellular network coverage and no Wi-Fi! Boston is notorious for having patchy cell coverage, and when an open wireless network wasn’t available my plans were foiled. I appreciate that the Red Sox management wants to maintain the old-time feel of baseball, but it’s times like these I realize just how dependent we all are on being connected. While sharing a moment with my friends may not be the most important use of the network, the ability to share them is powerful. If for nothing else than to support a dedicated fan, maybe Fenway should look into our Connected Stadium solution!

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