Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Open at Cisco

Paradigm Shift with Edge Intelligence

In my Internet of Things keynote at LinuxCon 2014 in Chicago last week, I touched upon a new trend: the rise of a new kind of utility or service model, the so-called IoT specific service provider model, or IoT SP for short.

I had a recent conversation with a team of physicists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. I told them they would be surprised to hear the new computer scientist’s talk these days, about Data Gravity.  Programmers are notorious for overloading common words, adding connotations galore, messing with meanings entrenched in our natural language.

We all laughed and then the conversation grew deeper:

  • Big data is very difficult to move around, it takes energy and time and bandwidth hence expensive. And it is growing exponentially larger at the outer edge, with tens of billions of devices producing it at an ever faster rate, from an ever increasing set of places on our planet and beyond.
  • As a consequence of the laws of physics, we know we have an impedance mismatch between the core and the edge, I coined this as the Moore-Nielsen paradigm (described in my talk as well): data gets accumulated at the edges faster than the network can push into the core.
  • Therefore big data accumulated at the edge will attract applications (little data or procedural code), so apps will move to data, not the other way around, behaving as if data has “gravity”

Therefore, the notion of a very large centralized cloud that would control the massive rise of data spewing from tens of billions of connected devices is pitched both against the laws of physics and Open Source not to mention the thirst for freedom (no vendor lock-in) and privacy (no data lock-in). The paradigm shifted, we entered the 3rd big wave (after the mainframe decentralization to client-server, which in turn centralized to cloud): the move to a highly decentralized compute model, where the intelligence is shifting to the edge, as apps come to the data, at much larger scale, machine to machine, with little or no human interface or intervention.

The age-old dilemma, do we go vertical (domain specific) or horizontal (application development or management platform) pops up again. The answer has to be based on necessity not fashion, we have to do this well; hence vertical domain knowledge is overriding. With the declining cost of computing, we finally have the technology to move to a much more scalable and empowering model, the new opportunity in our industry, the mega trend.

Very reminiscent of the early 90′s and the beginning of the ISPs era, isn’t it? This time much more vertical with deep domain knowledge: connected energy, connected manufacturing, connected cities, connected cars, connected home, safety and security.  These innovation hubs all share something in common: an Open and Interconnected model, made easy by the dramatically lower compute cost and ubiquity in open source, to overcome all barriers of adoption, including the previously weak security or privacy models predicated on a central core. We can divide and conquer, deal with data in motion, differently than we deal with data at rest.

The so-called “wheel of computer science” has completed one revolution, just as its socio-economic observation predicted, the next generation has arrived, ready to help evolve or replace its aging predecessor. Which one, or which vertical will it be first…?

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cisco, Linux Foundation, and OpenSSL

The recent OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability has shown that technology leaders must work together to secure the Internet’s critical infrastructure. That’s why Cisco is proud to be a founding supporter of the Linux Foundation initiative announced yesterday (April 24th).

The initiative will fund open source projects that are critical to core computing and Internet functions, and Cisco sees security technologies as a fundamental infrastructure component. The first project being considered for funding is OpenSSL. As a longtime contributor to open source and user, we’ve offered code and intellectual property to enhance OpenSSL. We’ve also provided patches and testing results to help address vulnerabilities. Today’s announcement takes that commitment a step further.

We are pleased to help form a critical mass of governance, funding, and focus that will support the output of open source communities like OpenSSL. By working together as an industry, we can expect greater security, stability, and robustness for components that are critical to the Internet.

For more Cisco-specific information on the Heartbleed vulnerability, please visit our event response page and Security Advisory. You may also be interested in our April 23 webinar titled, Heartbleed: Assessing and Mitigating Your Risk.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Open Source is just the other side, the wild side!

March is a rather event-laden month for Open Source and Open Standards in networking: the 89th IETF, EclipseCon 2014, RSA 2014, the Open Networking Summit, the IEEE International Conference on Cloud (where I’ll be talking about the role of Open Source as we morph the Cloud down to Fog computing) and my favorite, the one and only Open Source Think Tank where this year we dive into the not-so-small world (there is plenty of room at the bottom!) of machine-to-machine (m2m) and Open Source, that some call the Internet of Everything.

There is a lot more to March Madness, of course, in the case of Open Source, a good time to celebrate the 1st anniversary of “Meet Me on the Equinox“, the fleeting moment where daylight conquered the night the day that project Daylight became Open Daylight. As I reflect on how quickly it started and grew from the hearts and minds of folks more interested in writing code than talking about standards, I think about how much the Network, previously dominated, as it should, by Open Standards, is now beginning to run with Open Source, as it should. We captured that dialog with our partners and friends at the Linux Foundation in this webcast I hope you’ll enjoy. I hope you’ll join us in this month in one of these neat places.

As Open Source has become dominant in just about everything, Virtualization, Cloud, Mobility, Security, Social Networking, Big Data, the Internet of Things, the Internet of Everything, you name it, we get asked how do we get the balance right? How does one work with the rigidity of Open Standards and the fluidity of Open Source, particularly in the Network? There is only one answer, think of it as the Yang of Open Standards, the Yin of Open Source, they need each other, they can not function without the other, particularly in the Network.  Open Source is just the other side, the wild side!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Open Daylight Shines in Impressive Debut

First Open Daylight Summit took place exactly one year since we’ve started the project, to the day! Ah, those memories of having to stay quietly patient, from our first meeting, February 4th, 2013, and longer… in hindsight, talking about it after the code actually started to flow was more appropriate, the 2013 Spring Equinox, as it should. The Open Daylight community has shown that code is the coin of the realm, as it should. To walk that talk, a million lines of code are flowing now and for a project with partners and committers as diverse as this, one cannot do that unless there is a strong tie that binds, the commitment that the best multi protocol controller will be open source: as Linux achieved that status in the OS world, OpenDaylight has a bright opportunity to do so in the network world. As for the bad news, there aren’t any: yes, we would like to see ourselves talk more about use, before we talk about our size, but for a one year old, I think we should be patient.

The outstanding news for this young project is the community diversity, energy and commitment: it brings the best protocol (SB) guys in the world with the best scientists and network (NB) developers in the world in a focused, collaborative, engaged community. Remember, in open source, community trumps code, which side by side with its project sovereignty, is nothing but a formula for success. That is what sets Open Daylight apart, and as long as we take care of those two things, it will be fine. As I said last week during the event, particularly good to see Google, Intel, Ericsson, Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, RedHat and others doing their presentations celebrating this event. I am proud of these guys, how they lead the way for any other Open Source project interested in leveraging the network (be it Open Stack, Open Compute Project, or others), Linux Foundation and Open Daylight is the best way to stay ahead, to stay engaged: if you are interesting in networking and open source, there is no other better place than this.

Diverse contributors in Open DaylightDiverse contributors in Open Daylight 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Availability of the Nexus 1000V Cloud Networking Platform for OpenStack Unveiled at Cisco live!

February 7, 2014 at 4:00 am PST

Last week at Cisco live! Milan, we announced another milestone in our OpenStack strategy with the availability this quarter of the Nexus 1000V virtual networking platform for Linux Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) hypervisor and integration with the commercial OpenStack distribution from Canonical (Ubuntu Linux and OpenStack). I had a chance to sit down in Milan with John Zannos, VP of Global Alliances at Canonical, to talk about the Cisco-Canonical partnership, and what the integration of Nexus 1000V into their OpenStack architecture means for customers.

The Nexus 1000V on KVM brings to the OpenStack cloud a fully integrated network virtualization solution. The solution provides a full layer-2 feature set, feature-rich Layer-3 IOS router, security and QoS policies, VXLAN virtual overlays, vPath-enabled virtual services, and full monitoring and management capabilities.  Enterprises and service providers may now deploy a full-featured virtual network infrastructure consistently across VMware, Microsoft, and Linux-based software platforms.

Nexus 1000V for Ubuntu Linux with OpenStack support is now available with full automation and orchestration of enablement of the solution via Juju/Charms. Juju provides both a command-line interface and an intuitive web app to design, build, configure, deploy and manage your infrastructure. Charms give Juju its power. They encapsulate application configurations, define how services are deployed, how they connect to other services and are scaled. Nexus 1000V support for Red Hat KVM and OpenStack is planned for later this year.

Additional details and data sheets can be found here.

And on a related note, if you are interested in Nexus 1000V-related items, we recently recorded a technical podcast with Greg Ferro and Ethan Banks of packetpushers.net on the Microsoft Hyper-V version of our virtual switch, which you can find here.

Tags: , , , , , ,