Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Collaboration

Cisco at GSX: Stocking the Collaboration Toolbox with the Right Tool for Every Job

August 30, 2012 at 4:55 am PST

Which tool is more important: a stud finder or a hex wrench? You don’t need to be terribly tool-savvy to know there’s a place and a time for each to shine; a stud finder would come in handy to hang a heavy shelf but be useless when adjusting a bike derailleur.

When it comes to employee collaboration, the “go-to tools” are multiplying as the workspace is changing.  Some employees still do the bulk of their work from behind a desk at company headquarters; others split their time between the office and more on-the-go locales; still others need “full mobility” with access to the best software collaboration offerings available so work can happen in coffee shops, airplanes, hotel rooms—wherever.  To support these shifts in the way work gets done, Cisco announced some big changes to its unified communications licensing scheme this week at its virtual sales conference, GSX.

With today’s announcement, Cisco is now:

- offering software-only licensing. Prior to this, getting Cisco unified communications meant acquiring a license and a Cisco phone. No more; now, Cisco’s UC offerings can be managed and deployed as a true software platform. While many will still choose to start with a hardware phone, others will choose another device, like a PC, a tablet or even a smartphone as their main communication and collaboration tool. It is now up to you. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Telepresence Accelerates Product Development for Customers of All Sizes and Across Industries

In my last post I talked about how telepresence is moving beyond the boardroom and being used in unique ways to add value, impact business process, and extend well beyond the basic function of travel cost savings to deliver better and more innovative results.  Cisco TelePresence is giving customers of all sizes and across all industries a competitive edge by improving the quality of products, speeding up review cycles and accelerating time-to-market.

A great example of this in the mid-market is Coraid, a storage technology provider based in Redwood City, California. Coraid is using multiple Cisco collaboration solutions, including the Cisco TelePresence EX Series and Quick Set C20 endpoints, Cisco Jabber along with Cisco WebEx Telepresence to foster communications between its headquarters in Silicon Valley and product development office in Georgia. In a field where moving quickly to stay ahead of the competition is crucial, telepresence enables Coraid to go-to-market faster with new offerings and to continue to pave the way as innovators.  This has given them the ability to also move up-market and engage with larger, Fortune 500 companies to grow their business. See the impact Cisco has had in their organization in this recent video.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Announcing the MSI on Cisco Jabber (Part 2)

July 30, 2012 at 9:00 am PST

In the first part of this blog, I discussed some of the challenges faced by network administrators and how the Cisco Jabber team has integrated their client with the Cisco Media Services Interface (MSI) to enable Cisco to provide an end to end solution to these problems. In this part of the blog, I discuss the impact and benefits of the Cisco Jabber and WebEx integrations into the Medianet architecture (especially for network devices that support Media Awareness), features such as MS Proxy, and the overall benefits to desktop clients.

So what does this mean for network devices that do support media awareness? The first impact is around performance management. Network devices are able to add this information to Netflow/IPFix records. Increasingly, network administrators are using Netflow/IPFix as the primary source of data to enable performance management. Netflow provides records of every flow that passes through the device and records the amount of packets sent, bandwidth consumed etc. Recently the ability to monitor the performance of these flows has been added to Netflow so now an administrator is able to match flows to performance data to determine whether the network is able to deliver the service these applications need. By adding metadata to these records the administrator can now distinguish between the various applications and media types, opening up the prospect for detailed reporting on performance and capacity down to a level of granularity that has never been possible in the past.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Security, mobility, and BYOD: ask the experts in a TweetChat

We all know that IT and business leaders are starting to accept, and in some cases embrace, the “bring your own device” (BYOD) movement in the enterprise and what the implications are for service providers. As we collaborate using our own devices at work, how is this affecting your security in the network?

Join Cisco experts on August 2, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. PT in an open discussion where we’ll take your questions and address your security concerns regarding BYOD and mobility.

Co-moderators:

Panel participants: Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Announcing the MSI on Cisco Jabber (Part 1)

July 23, 2012 at 4:29 pm PST

Cisco recently announced the availability of the Cisco Jabber for Windows client which now supports the Cisco Media Services Interface (MSI). This is Cisco Jabber’s first step towards integration into the medianet architecture and along with similar support within the WebEx meeting client will have a profound effect on how customers can manage Quality of Service (QoS) for desktop video enabled applications.

Today, one of the most common issues which prevent a wide scale deployment of desktop video clients is the lack of visibility and control that the network administrators have over these deployments. Unlike video conferencing or telepresence units that are invariably in the same place, desktop clients by their very nature move around and can pop up just about anywhere: Inside and outside of the enterprise, connected via VPN or wireless and, of course, they are mobile enough to appear in different offices unannounced. Given that network administrators are charged with delivering acceptable application performance across their network infrastructure, the uncontrolled deployment of desktop video can be a real nightmare. Is the network ready to support the potentially large numbers of concurrent desktop video sessions? What happens if too many sessions are concentrated in a site with limited or oversubscribed bandwidth? How do I protect my existing revenue generating applications from the impact of bandwidth hungry video applications? It is no wonder that it is the network administrator who typically ends up being the roadblock to deployment, given the lack of tools by which to do capacity planning, performance monitoring/management, and, of course, traffic engineering to protect the experience.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,