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What’s on Cisco’s Technology Radar? Predictions for 2014 and Beyond

Will an ‘Internet of Everything’ shorten your commute in the morning? Are we at the beginning or the end of the SDN hype cycle? What exactly is ‘context aware’ computing? How will large format HDTV technology transform the way global teams work together? 

Just before the holidays, I had the pleasure of posing these and other questions to a distinguished panel of Cisco engineers, innovators and business leaders.

Susie Wee, VP and CTO, Networked Experiences, Lauren Cooney, Senior Director, Software Strategy , CTO and Architecture Office, David Ward, CTO of Engineering and Chief Architect and Maciej Kranz, VP of the Corporate Technology Group led a discussion inspired by the work of Cisco’s Technology Radar team.

Cisco’s Tech Radar brings together a network of 80+ scouts  to identify emerging technology trends and forecast their impact on business, governments, and everyday society through a five, ten and twenty-five years time frame. The findings inform Cisco’s engineering and corporate development strategy.

During the course of 90 minutes, our panel dissected as many of those trends as they could, from augmented collaboration to WebRTC; mega data centers to SDN; security and privacy to the Internet of Everything.  You can view some highlights of the discussion in the video below, or – if your New Year isn’t too busy yet – you can watch the entire Technology Radar 2014 program here.

Join the conversation #CiscoTechRadar

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IPv6 is Everywhere at Cisco Live Milan

IPv6 deployment is accelerating at a fast pace. It’s exciting to see that the global IPv6 deployment figures show a continuing upward trend:

IPv6_projection

Cisco has been helping the Industry track this trend with our global deployment statistics portal: http://6lab.cisco.com/stats/. Go to the portal today and you can even follow @cisco6lab on Twitter.

IPv6 Lab

We are also showcasing our IPv6 deployment adoption later this month at the annual Cisco Live Europe event in Milan. We are proud to announce that IPv6 content and demonstrations will be key features at our event from the show room floor to technical sessions, breakouts, panels, labs, and more. Read More »

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IPv6 Video Rollout via RDK Hits Europe, You Heard it Here First!

By Bill Ver Steeg, Distinguished Engineer, Cisco Systems

We are proud to put down in writing what we believe to be the first Reference Design Kit (RDK)-based deployment of IP video. Oh, and it is the first IPTV system running on IPv6. And one of the first based on a combination of premises based products and cloud-based services. And it all went from concept to turn-up in 50 days!

The deployment happened in Europe, but if you’re in Las Vegas this week at CES, we will also be demoing it for customers at The Wynn Hotel.

What was involved:

Our customer wanted to showcase its brand new IPv6 network by delivering a world-class IP video experience. An all-IPv6 IP video system had never been deployed before, so this was a non-trivial challenge. We chose to use the leading edge components in RDK in the IPv6 environment. Our challenge: they wanted it in and complete in 50 days, from project start to subscribers using it. To meet this challenge we turned to a combination of our new Videoscape Cloud Services SaaS offerings and premise based solutions.

Let’s talk about the toolkit that allowed us to deliver this customized solution in such a rapid timeframe. First and foremost, the delivery required all of the components to work in IPv6–only mode. It’s no great secret that Cisco is highly focused on IPv6 (understatement), and our RDK based systems are no exception. As our customers migrate from IPv4 to Ipv6, all of our video products are being widely deployed in mixed IPv4-IPv6 environments worldwide. As can be imagined, there were considerable production, testing and integration challenges with working in a pure IPv6 deployment.

We started by Read More »

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The Cisco RV325 – The newest edition to the Cisco Small Business Routing Portfolio

December 20, 2013 at 12:56 pm PST

Now that the Holidays are upon us, and we look forward to 2014, the Cisco Small Business team continues to raise the Small Business networking bar with the introduction of the all new Cisco RV325. This Dual WAN, 14-port VPN Router, provides all of the same performance, security and reliability of the RV320 launched last June. Both routers are perfect for fast-growing small businesses or branch deployments. So if you are looking for more ports in the same enclosure, the RV325 is the Small Business router to take a look at.

RV320 and RV325

RV320 and RV325

Like the it’s smaller sibling the RV320, the RV325 is a perfect match with the Cisco Small Business SG300 Series Switches and WAP500 Series Access Points. As you saw from my last Blog, the WAP551 and WAP561 boasts a nice feature-set including Captive Portal and Single Point Set-up. The WAP 551/561 are controller-less Access Points meaning additional hardware is not required. The SG300 Series offers a nice blend of features at an affordable price and are designed Small Business. It has most of the features that can be found in today’s Enterprise-class Switches.

This formidable combination makes for the perfect solution for that many Small Businesses and Organizations can take advantage of. Add in our portfolio of award-winning Cisco Small Business Services, and you have a solution that all that guarantees a positive experience from Cisco Small Business Team.

One Option for this solution is the newly launched 200 Series of Smart Switches. There are four new models including 10-, 24-, 26-, and 50-port switches. These Full Power PoE Smart Switches are a great alternative as they offer a generous feature-set, solid performance and even greater affordability.

SG200 Series PoE Smart Switch

SG200 Series PoE Smart Switch

 

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year’s from the Team at Cisco Small Business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IPv6-Centric Networking: Innovation Without Constraints

Over the last several months, I’ve been pleased to invite Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized expert on Internet Protocol (IP), to discuss IPv6 as a key enabler of the Internet of Everything (IoE). In his series of guest blogs, Mark has explained the basics of IPv6 and why it is important (“Demystifying IPv6”), and discussed some of the technical challenges of moving to this latest version of IP (“Moving to IPv6: Rebuilding the Heart of the Internet Without Missing a Beat”). In this installment, Mark takes a look into the future at some of the things IPv6 will make possible. I’m particularly excited about this, because the unlimited addressing scheme of IPv6 is what will enable the exponential growth of connections among people, process, data, and things that will drive $14.4 trillion in IoE private-sector value over the next decade, and dramatically impact our daily lives. This is Mark’s third and final blog on IPv6.

 

townsleyIn my last blog, I explored various ways that IPv4 and IPv6 can coexist on the same network —each vital during the global IPv6 transition period, which began in earnest after the World IPv6 Launch last year. Today, I want to highlight new network deployments and designs that I like to call “IPv6-centric.” These architectures go beyond the more conservative approach of a congruent dual-stack IP network. Instead, they are designed and operated from the ground up with IPv6 at the base. While these networks can accommodate IPv4, IPv6 takes center stage.

 

IPv6-Centric Mobile Networks: Beginning last month, T-Mobile and Metro PCS users in the United States running the latest version of Android software are now provisioned with IPv6 by default, with no IPv4 address from the ISP network. Traffic to IPv6-enabled destinations such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, and Wikipedia will simply use IPv6. Traffic to non-IPv6-enabled sites will be translated to IPv4 after traversing the ISP network. If there are any remaining applications on the device that simply do not know how to handle IPv6, the Android device itself performs and IPv4-to-IPv6 translation internally, so the access network doesn’t see IPv4 at all.

“4G speeds and IoE are driving ‘scale-up’ and ‘scale-out’ in mobile networks. The scarcity of globally routable IPv4 addresses forces a series of compromises that an IPv6-only infrastructure alleviates, providing a solid bedrock to build upon.”

—    Cameron Byrne, T-Mobile Wireless, USA

Read More »

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