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Quitting the Legacy IP at Cisco Live Milan

It’s that time of the year again -- time for some computer and human networking at Cisco Live Milan! This year I’m taking the unusual and somewhat risky step of blogging about the network infrastructure before the event. This is because we’re going to try something interesting for the networking folks. We are going to try and get rid of the Legacy IP, otherwise known as IPv4.

Before you get too worried -- no, the dual stack network setup does not disappear. Lots of critical parts of our everyday lives still need the old and proven protocol to successfully operate, so removing it would be irresponsible to say the least. But some of you may be interested to try (in a controlled fashion) exactly how strong the ties to the old good legacy. If you are one of these people, this post is for you -- because this blog entry is one of the few places, if not the only one, to find the IPv6-only SSID name and access credentials.

First of all, what’s the big deal with IPv6-only access network, wasn’t this tried before?

Sure, it is not all new. The first time we tried an IPv6-only network was at IPv6 World Congress conference in Paris, early spring 2012. We also had an IPv6-only SSID in one of the Cisco Live US conferences. We discovered that the subset of the operating systems that could successfully operate in this kind of environment was pretty small. But as time passed, evidence suggests the situation was slowly improving. Read More »

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Moving to IPv6: Rebuilding the Heart of the Internet Without Missing a Beat

Within the coming decade, Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) will be key to enabling 50 billion connections among people, processes, data, and things in the Internet of Everything (IoE)But how we get there from here is not a simple matter.

I’m very pleased to invite Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized industry expert on IP, to discuss this important transition in the second of our three-part blog series on IPv6. The first blog in Mark’s series was “Demystifying IPv6”.

townsley

Three years ago, I organized a conference in Paris where I thought it would be fascinating to bring together the original designers of IPv6 alongside the engineers who were finally deploying it at scale more than a decade later. During this discussion, Steve Deering, one of the “fathers” of IPv6 in the 1990s, was asked one of the most common questions about IPv6: Why wasn’t it designed for backward compatibility with IPv4? After all, wouldn’t it be easier to make the transition if the two versions could transparently coexist? Steve answered that the problem is not that IPv6 wasn’t designed to be backward-compatible—the real problem is that IPv4 wasn’t designed to be forward-compatible.

Steve was making the point that IPv4 was designed with a fixed address space. Given the number of computers connected to the Arpanet throughout the 1970s, this fixed-length address field seemed to be sufficient—at least for that version of IP. IP had been replaced before, and it seemed perfectly reasonable at the time that it might be replaced again. Read More »

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Demystifying IPv6

Version 6 of the Internet protocol (IPv6) is a key enabler of the Internet of Everything (IoE). People, data, and things all need IP addresses to connect to the Internet. But we’ve already run out of IP addresses under IPv4, which dictates almost all (98.5 percent) of Internet traffic today. Even with all of the attention IPv6 has received, confusion and misinformation abound.

I’m extremely pleased to have Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized industry expert on IP, explore IPv6 over a series of three blogs.

In these posts, Mark will demystify IPv6, discuss how to best make the transition from IPv4 to IPv6, and take a look “under the hood” of IP so that companies and industries can get the most value from IoE. Read More »

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Setting Up an IPv6 Testing Plan

May 28, 2013 at 1:30 pm PST

In my previous blog, I talked about building out a lab to help with IPv6 integration testing.  It cannot be understated how important it is to test any new feature that is going to be deployed on the network.  This statement is true independent of the feature involved.  In this case, we are talking about IPv6, but we could just as easily be talking about virtualization or BYOD.

So now that we have the lab build up in progress, what’s next?  Read More »

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Real World Demonstration of MAP for IPv6

andrewyourtchenkoBy Andrew Yourtchenko, Technical Leader, Network Operations Systems Technology Group

As any geek, I find it a lot of fun to get some hands with the new technology -- be it a new gadget, new product or a solution.

It’s not very often that I have a chance to play with a whole new protocol. EANTC (European Advanced Network Testing Center) interoperability testing gave me such a chance. The bulk of the work happened on EANTC premises in Germany this past February. The overall activity involved many representatives from various vendors making their devices talk to each other. The goal is to test the protocols in several areas, including MPLS, SDN, and IPv6, but the highlight for me was the testing of MAP (Mapping Address and Port) -- a new protocol to enable the sharing of IPv4 addresses by several customer premise devices without keeping the state at the service provider end.

This protocol is being developed by IETF, and has two flavours, the standards-track “MAP” which uses encapsulation to transmit the packets, otherwise known also as MAP, and the experimental track “MAP-T” -- which uses the address family translation in order to send packets, instead of the encapsulation. Read More »

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