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Working Remotely Just got Better With OfficeExtend 600 Series AP’s

It’s always been important to remote workers to have a solution that provides both secure connectivity to their corporate network and simple user experience.With the recent Summer Blockbuster release of the Cisco Wireless Release 8.0, using the OfficeExtend 600 Series Access Points (OEAP-600) just got better.  Here are a few of the enhancements that come to OEAP-600 with Release 8.0:

  • Firewall for personal networking -- Provides port/application protection for personal network traffic that can be controlled by the end user. While the corporate firewall is protecting your corporate data traffic, you now have the capability to make your personal network traffic more secure also with this feature.
  • Split-tunnel for Internet traffic -- Enables corporate clients to reach the Internet directly through the WAN instead of tunneling the data traffic through the corporate network. Provides the IT administrator the flexibility to configure the level of split-tunnel capability needed for their network. Together with the existing Split-tunnel for Printer feature the OEAP-600 provides maximum flexibility for printing and managing data traffic between the remote & corporate office.
  • QOS Enhancements for Voice traffic – Assigns high priority for voice packets for remote workers using the OEAP-600 and a VOIP solution in their home or remote office to enhance the remote workers voice call experience. Read More »

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HPC over UDP

September 12, 2014 at 9:52 am PST

A few months ago, I posted an entry entitled “HPC in L3“.  My only point for that entry was to remove the “HPC in L3? That’s a terrible idea!” knee-jerk reaction that us old-timer HPC types have.

I mention this because we released a free software update a few days ago for the Cisco usNIC product that enables usNIC traffic to flow across UDP (vs. raw L2 frames).  Woo hoo!

That’s right, sports fans: another free software update to make usNIC even better than ever.  Especially across 40Gb interfaces!

Read More »

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At IBC 2014, Cisco and Partners Will Demonstrate All IP Live Production for Broadcasters

After the already well-established distribution, contribution and file-based IP workflows, the next step towards an IP based infrastructure is live production. Broadcast facilities are now at the beginning of this long-term transition journey for the live production market.

Many of those involved in the industry developing traditional broadcast production networks may still have limited experience with the new technologies, protocols and standards that enable the convergence between broadcast and IP. Such a transition will take time to occur due to the current investment in the existing live production related technology and workflows.

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) are hosting on their International Broadcasting Convention (IBC) 2014 booth (10.F20), an All IP Live Production demonstration provided by Cisco, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), and Tektronix emphasising on how multi-vendor live production architectures are today feasible, practical and easy to use by existing staff.

Networked_Studio_IBC_2014-small

The demonstration highlights how a low latency Cisco Nexus 3548 based network enables the BBC R&D developed Stagebox devices to deliver video, audio, tally and remote camera control over IP between a studio and a production gallery (production control room).

Leveraging the built-in Read More »

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Why We Will Forever and Fondly Remember The 2014 NAB Show

By now, those of us who attended this year’s National Association of Broadcasters convention are back home (or onto the next trip!) The last of the crates are packed out, we got the job done, and we’re ready to move on to NCTA or the Cable Show, then ANGA.

But before we file 2014 NAB along with other trade show memory, I wanted to take a moment to call out a few things high points. This NAB represents a milestone, even a leap forward in the broadcast industry’s slow-but-steady transition to all-IP technologies.

The question is not if, or how gradually, but when and how soon!

Cisco is a company that hails from the Internet. We make equipment and software that is seeping into other industries. This takes time. We know that, which is why we began developing tools and technologies for video broadcasters and service providers over two decades ago. (In Internet time, that’s a lot of cycles…!)

But this time, Read More »

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Energy Networking Convergence Part 1 – The Journey From Serial to IP

This is the first of a four part series on the convergence of IT and OT (Operational Technologies)

Part 2 will cover the impact of the transition to IP on Physical Security and the convergence of Physical and Cyber Security.

Part 3 will discuss the convergence of IT and OT -- Operational Technology of all types outside the traditional realm of Information Processing.

Part 4 will look at how to actually make the transition to a converged IT/OT infrastructure and tips on overcoming the challenges.

Those of us in the Energy Industry know that the utilities segment is in transition. The network architecture, in particular,  is undergoing change -- change that will bring challenges as well as opportunities for both Cisco and our customers.

Almost every communication application started as point to point serial — including computer communications.  But the simple geometry problem of how many lines are needed to connect every vertex (node) of a polygon to every other vertex [ n(n-3)/2 if you’re curious ] shows that as the number of nodes grows, connecting each one to every other one quickly becomes infeasible.

HAK22620 - for webThe need to interconnect more and more devices lead to multi-drop or bus topologies and challenges of how to deal with sorting out who gets to talk when and the solutions of token passing, polling and TDM.

Circuit switching was a big breakthrough developed out of necessity as the number of telephone handsets exploded. Interestingly enough, look at the hierarchical topology of trunking and local switching and you may recognize analog similarity to NAT.

Initial application of networking often occurs as the use of Ethernet to replace serial communication with flat, layer-2 networks, to interconnect multiple nodes with polling and TDM used exactly as they were in serial systems.  That’s where most SCADA systems still live today and why there are relatively few monitored points, limited by how quickly the polling loop can be traversed.  Imagine trying to run the internet that way?

Fast forward and almost every industry and industrial application that started off as serial or circuit switched has migrated or is migrating to packet switched as IP packet technology has made astonishing progress along the price/performance curve.

High performance IP is now able to offer latency performance that used to require dedicated connections.  Along with IP have come the tools to manage, diagnose, repair and secure the communication network.  Relative to the billions of dollars invested by companies around the world in tools, security, management, etc. for IP, the investments being made in securing and improving serial or TDM are almost nonexistent.

Globally, Service Providers who built their industry on circuit switched analog and TDM are terminating those services as they move to complete their transition to IP.

Cisco continues to play a key role in transitioning serial/TDM technology to IP, helping customers get full benefit of the robust performance and security capabilities and features IP offers.  Customers who have received End of Service notices for Framerelay are scrambling to find alternatives and at the same time achieve regulatory compliance.

As Operation Technology groups outside of IT increasingly use IT Information & Communication Technology (ICT), they need the same capabilities as IT.

What does this mean for Cisco and our customers?

Relationships with the business, including the operations side of the business are key.  Budget is increasingly in the hands of the business rather than IT. As a result, Cisco and our customers’  IT departments are increasingly collaborating with the operational side of the business -- especially the OT, or ‘Operational Technologies’ part of our customer’s organization.

Cisco has specialized industry sales support teams in a group called CVA (Cisco Value Acceleration) Group, which I’m a part of, as well as Cisco Advanced Services and other Cisco Business Units (especially the IOTG, or Internet of Things Group) along with groups such as the Cisco Global Industries Center of Expertise (GICE) to understand the trends, business imperatives and compelling events creating opportunity with customers.

If you’d like to know more about these groups, Read More »

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