Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Education

Transforming Education with the Internet of Everything at San Jose State

December 15, 2014 at 9:05 am PST

Forward-thinking faculty members and staff at San Jose State University are using Internet of Everything technologies in innovative ways to transform education:

Project Assistant Quyen Grant is using Cisco collaboration technologies to expand learning across international borders, working with students and universities in Vietnam through the Social Work Education Enhancement Program (SWEEP); Advertising Professor John Delacruz is using Cisco TelePresence for his students to deliver final presentations to potential advertising clients who may be in remote locations. Julia Curry-Rodriguez, associate professor of Mexican American Studies, uses Cisco Lecture Capture to help non-native English speaking students improve their language skills.

These are just a few of the examples we learned about on December 10, 2014 at San Jose State University as they hosted global media, analysts, social media influencers, and Cisco for a series of roundtables that addressed how the Internet of Everything is impacting industries including education and the public and private sectors. Read More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Announcing Connected Analytics for IoE

Over the past few weeks, I’ve shared how we are helping our customers address one of their toughest challenges brought on by the Internet of Everything (IoE), Big Data and hybrid IT environments: effective management of the massive amounts of data, types of data and in various locations. With solutions like Data Virtualization , Big Data Warehouse Expansion and Cisco Tidal Enterprise Scheduler, we give our customers the tools to address this challenge head on.

Once you have access to all of your data…what next? The second challenge is to extract real-time valuable information from data in order to make better business decisions. As I’ve said before, more data is only a good thing if you use that data to better respond to opportunities and potential threats. Our customers certainly understand this and, in a recent Cisco study, 40% of surveyed companies identified effectively capturing, storing and analyzing data generated by connected “things” (e.g., machines, devices, equipment) as the biggest challenge to realizing the value of IoT.

The majority of data analysis has historically been performed after moving all data into a centralized repository, but digital enterprises will have so many connections creating so much widely distributed data that moving it all to a central place for analysis will no longer be the optimal approach. For insights needed in real-time, or data sets that are too large to move, the ability to perform analytics at the edge will be a new capability that must be incorporated into any comprehensive analytics strategy.

Analytics 1.0 was all about structured data, in centralized data repositories.  Analytics 2.0 added unstructured data and gave rise to Big Data. Analytics 3.0 will require all of those existing capabilities but will also require data management and analytics capabilities closer to where the data is created…at the edge of the network.

With this new approach in mind, today we announced Connected Analytics for IoE, packaged, network-enriched analytics that leverage Cisco technologies and data to extract real-time valuable information called:

  • Optimize the fan experience -- Connected Analytics for Events monitors Wi-Fi, device and application usage along with social media to deliver insights on fan engagement and business operations.
  • Improve store operations and customer service -- Connected Analytics for Retail supports analysis of metrics, including customer and operational data in retail environments, to help stores take new steps to assure customer satisfaction and store performance.
  • Enhance service quality, customer experience and unveil opportunities for new business -- Connected Analytics for Service Providers provides near real-time operational and customer intelligence from patterns in networks, operations, and customer system data.
  • Understand how to get the most out of your IT assets -- Connected Analytics for IT provides advanced data management, data governance, business intelligence and insights to help align and get the most out of IT capabilities and services.
  • Reveal hidden patterns impacting network deployment and optimization -- Connected Analytics for Network Deployment analyzes devices, software, and features for inconsistencies that disrupt network operations and provides visualizations and actionable recommendations to prioritize network planning and optimization activities.
  • Understand customer patterns in order to meet quality expectations and uncover monetization strategies -- Connected Analytics for Mobility analyzes mobile networks to provide network, operations and business insights for pro-active governance to Wi-Fi solution customers.
  • Gain a holistic view of customers across data silos -- Cisco Connected Analytics for Contact Center delivers actionable customer intelligence to impact behaviors and outcomes during the critical window of customer decision making. Having the right offer at the right time will drive market leadership.
  • Measure the impact of collaboration in comparison with best practices -- Cisco Connected Analytics for Collaboration measures the adoption of collaboration technologies internally. It leverages data collection using the Unified Communications Audit Tool, from sources such as WebEx, IP Phones, Video, Email and Jabber.

The portfolio also includes Cisco Connected Streaming Analytics, a scalable, real-time platform that combines quick and easy network data collection from a variety of sources with one of the fastest streaming analytics engines in the industry.

In the world of IoE, data is massive, messy, and everywhere, spanning many sources – cloud, data warehouses, devices – and formats – video, voice, text, and images. The power of an intelligent infrastructure is what brings all of this data together, regardless of its location or type. That is the Cisco difference.

 

Join the Conversation

Follow @MikeFlannagan and @CiscoAnalytics.

Learn More from My Colleagues

Check out the blogs of Mala Anand, Bob Eve and Nicola Villa to learn more.

Tags: , , , ,

The New Analytics Imperative

Cisco today announced a data and analytics strategy and a suite of analytics software that will enable customers to translate their data into actionable business insight regardless of where the data resides.

With the number of connected devices projected to grow from 10 billion today to 50 billion by 2020, the flood tide of new data — widely distributed and often unstructured — is disrupting traditional data management and analytics. Traditionally most organizations created data inside their own four walls and saved it in a centralized repository. This made it easy to analyze the data and extract valuable information to make better business decisions.

But the arrival of the Internet of Everything (IoE) — the hyper-connection of people, process, data, and things – is quickly changing all that. The amount of data is huge. It’s coming from widely disparate sources (like mobile devices, sensors, or remote routers), and much of that data is being created at the edge. Organizations can now get data from everywhere — from every device and at any time — to answer questions about their markets and customers that they never could before. But IT managers and key decision makers are struggling to find the useful business nuggets from this mountain of data.

As an example, take the typical offshore oil rig, which generates up to 2 terabytes of data per day. The majority of this data is time sensitive to both production and safety. Yet it can take up to 12 days to move a single day’s worth of data from its source at the network edge back to the data center or cloud. This means that analytics at the edge are critical to knowing what’s going on when it’s happening now, not almost 2 weeks later.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

How ‘Data’ and ‘Process’ Are Reshaping the Future Workforce

The sheer size, variety, and speed of data traversing today’s networks are increasing exponentially. This highly distributed data is generated by a wide range of cloud and enterprise applications, websites, social media, computers, smartphones, sensors, cameras, and much more — all coming in different formats and protocols.

Whether it is in the cloud or at the edge, data generated by the Internet of Everything (IoE) must be analyzed to identify actionable insights that can be used to create better outcomes (such as from process optimization or improved customer engagement). Without this critical step, data remains just “data.”

There is often an immense gap, however, between the amount of data with hidden value and the amount of value that is actually being extracted. According to IDC, less than 1 percent of the world’s data is currently being analyzed. What good is data if isn’t analyzed to gain insights?

It’s no surprise, then, that in a recent survey conducted by Cisco Consulting Services, IT and Operational Technology leaders indicated that they perceive the Internet of Things (IoT) — a critical enabler of IoE — as being about much more than just “things.” When we asked them which area (people, process, data, or things) they needed to improve most to make effective use of IoT solutions, the largest number (40 percent) indicated “Data,” while “Process” (27 percent) ranked second. “People” placed third (20 percent) and “Things” finished last (13 percent).

Focus on Capturing Insights, Not on Connecting Things, to Attain IoT Value from Cisco Business Insights

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Future Innovators and Entrepreneurs: The IoTWF Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge is Open

GirlsForIoTInnovation sqIn October at the Internet of Things World Forum we announced the Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge.  This challenge was announced to help bring more women into the sciences as we connect more of the unconnected with the Internet of Things. I’m pleased to announce that the IoT World Forum Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge is now open for submissions!

This challenge came about as a way to help address one of the biggest challenges to the Internet of Things – the dearth of technologically trained workers.  Over the next few years, technology jobs –those requiring a degree in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM), are expected to grow twice as fast as non-STEM jobs.  While the demand for this workforce is growing, women are a significantly under-utilized resource.  In the United States, a little over 18% of computer science and engineering degrees are awarded to women – while in general more women are getting bachelor’s degrees, the number of women in STEM has declined over the last 20 years from highs of 20.9% for engineering in 2002 and 29% for computer science in 1991. Read More »

Tags: , , , ,