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From Concept to Execution: Connecting the Car

Cars are important to Cisco.

With Cisco’s heritage in networking the enterprise, we understand how to create a secure, scalable and high performing networking framework – one that enables connectivity and new user experiences. In a nutshell, this has been the foundation for our efforts in connecting cars. We’ve taken some of the key aspects of our enterprise core in defining how we view the car of the future. With a highly secure and reliable networking infrastructure as the foundation of a connected vehicle, you enable a full spectrum of partners to create new experiences for end users and you enable tangible benefits for the automotive industry and its customers.

In Traverse City, Michigan this week, we’ve had a very exciting demo to show off. With tier 1 supplier Continental, we’re announcing the very first proof-of-concept of a connected vehicle using Cisco technology. With the Center for Automotive Research Management Briefing Seminars as the backdrop, we’re showcasing for attendees the impact of Cisco’s enterprise-grade, secure and seamless wireless network technology on the connected vehicle.

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As Connections Surge, Unique IDs Will Be Key

Uniquely Identifying Things Enables the Internet of Everything to Thrive

In February 2014, patents are set to expire on selective laser sintering, the key to industrial-grade 3D printing.3D Printing Opportunities This is expected to cause an explosion in 3D printing.

In a recent interview, GE CEO Jeff Immelt cited his company’s rapid adoption of this technology in manufacturing its new line of jet engines. “3D printing allows you to make that product right the first time,” he stresses, adding that it is “worth a lot of investment.” The UPS Store also sees the importance of this potentially game-changing technology. It is running a test program that will make it the first national retailer in the United States to offer 3D printing services targeted at helping entrepreneurs, architects, startups and other retail customers.

In the Internet of Everything realm, 3D printing promises exciting opportunities by enabling unique identifiers to be printed directly onto a product or product part. In the GizMag article RFID be gone: Why you might soon be 3D printing the Internet of Things, author James Holloway explores the emerging field of terahertz imaging (Tz). Scientists have developed a way to print a unique 3D tag called an InfraStruct, which is added within the object as it is being printed. These tags take on various forms or patterns, giving an object a unique fingerprint, or “watermark”. The InfraStrut can be read by a scanner using terahertz radiation. The terahertz band falls between microwave and infrared wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Current RFID technology requires a chip that can slow the printing process and increases the cost of the item; printed Tz IDs would greatly simplify and streamline the process. Terahertz could ultimately provide new ways to connect certain objects at a lower cost by recognizing items without the need for a chip.

Looking forward, a Tz scanner could be built into your smart phone. You could then scan the aisles at your local retailer for the precise plumbing part to mend your broken sink — or the right color cartridge for your home printer. Retailers, in turn, could associate special deals with your buying history. Scan that sofa through your shopping app and up pops a personal discount aligned with your level of brand loyalty!

The success and growth of the Internet of Everything depends on connecting staggering numbers of people, processes, data, and things. Discovering novel ways of connecting new things —including being able to make those connected objects uniquely identifiable — will continue to be crucial.

What are other ways do you see emerging that will uniquely connect things?

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Ask The Futurist: Will the Internet of Everything Make Universal Digital Medical Records a Reality?

Waiting rooms. Lengthy paper work. Medical bills. When you are ill, these are the last things you want to worry about. Checking in to your appointment shouldn’t take longer than your visit with the doctor, and the old paper charts just aren’t cutting it anymore. The industry has taken huge steps in moving to electronic health records (EHR), but what’s next? With the Internet of Everything connecting people, processes, data and things, how can electronic health records and smart devices play a role in saving lives?

A couple of weeks ago, I kicked off a new blog series called “Ask the Futurist” where I answer questions about the future directly from you. Today’s question comes from Isaac Naor, SVP & Chief Technology Officer at Ping Mobile:

Question: “Will more smart devices in healthcare drive medical institutions to innovate by creating a single universal digital format for medical records?”

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Cisco and WIRED.com #IoE Tweet Chat Recap

What do you think should be connected to the Internet of Everything?

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Last week, Cisco and WIRED.com asked that very question as part of an all-day Tweet Chat, stirring up a huge amount of conversation around the connection possibilities of the future! Throughout the day, readers submitted their ideas of what could connect on IoE, tagging their responses with #IoE and @Cisco to join the chat. Submissions were featured on the WIRED.com homepage as part of a special homepage module.

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Summary: Hacking Made Easy – Courtesy of IoT

July 31, 2013 at 1:33 pm PST

With the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT), technology has become an integral part of our daily lives and promises to become even more prevalent in the near future. While this is normally a good thing – making our lives easier and more comfortable, any technology can be just as easily turned against us if it hasn’t been properly secured. In fact, there seems to be a direct correlation between the value of a connected object in our daily lives and the degree of pain inflicted if that object falls prey to hackers. Two recent articles in well-known publications highlight this fact.

Because IoT puts technology closer to home than ever before, much more is at stake than with prior networks.  As a result, the need for proper security can’t be emphasized enough.

Read the full Hacking Made Easy – Courtesy of IoT blog to learn more and to and gain access to the two articles.

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