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What the Exponential Power of the #InternetOfEverything Means for Smart Connected Cities

Barcelona, Amsterdam, Nice, London and New York are arguably some of the world’s most cosmopolitan cities. However, they have more than glamorous fashions, exquisite cuisine and vibrant nightlife in common. All are connecting things, such as cars and trash cans, to the Internet, making their cities work more efficiently.

As the Internet of Things continues to grow and connect things, and the explosion of big data, cloud and mobile devices change our landscape, it’s important to emphasize that a connected life is more than just smart appliances. As more things, people, and data become connected, the power of the Internet (essentially a network of networks) grows exponentially.

This is what we call the Internet of Everything (IoE) – the network effect of bringing together people, process, data and things—to create better social, environmental and economic outcomes in businesses and communities.

Recently, I wrote about how innovative cities, like Copenhagen, and the surrounding districts of Albertslund and Frederikssund are taking decisive action to reinvent themselves with the latest network infrastructure linked to the Internet.

Here’s a closer look at a few examples of the Internet of Everything in action in cities all over the world:

  • In Albertslund, work already has begun on the Danish Outdoor Light Lab (DOLL), which will become a showcase for smart lighting. Nearly 40 competing outdoor light solutions converged onto one open network will provide enormous potential to cut costs and consumption while improving public safety.Cisco_IoE Wim blog
  • In the Frederikssund district, just 25 miles from downtown Copenhagen, the greenfield City of Vinge has one of the greenest and most innovative master plans in Europe, setting the groundwork to be carbon neutral from the outset. Underpinning this goal are plans for an application-centric infrastructure that connects people, data, processes and things – the perfect example of the Internet of Everything.
  • And in the Copenhagen municipality itself, smart lighting, parking, water management, smart grids and more all to be converged onto one network, and powered by sensors everywhere, will improve sustainability, resiliency and overall livability.
  • Barcelona’s Born District, a bustling neighborhood of restaurants, shops and boutiques uses a customized network for reports on temperature, noise, humidity, particle-concentration and more, providing an overview of the city’s overall “livability.” The information is then relayed to city “situation” rooms, allowing officials to detect levels that are outside of set thresholds and improve on them.
  • In London and other parts of the UK, the Internet of Everything is causing city and government administrators to begin thinking long-term about energy consumption and their manufacturing industry. Facing a looming energy shortfall and poised to take its place as an international manufacturing hub, the UK is taking full advantage of the reach of the Internet of Everything as it works to solve infrastructure and economic challenges.

These examples are just the beginning of how with the Internet of Everything can change our world.

Thirty years ago, there were just 1,000 connections to the Internet throughout the world. Today, with the help of app-centric infrastructure, sensors and mobile devices, there are about 13 billion connections, and this is still just 1 percent of what’s possible. The economic opportunity to connect the unconnected totals $19 trillion, comprising $4.6 trillion for the public sector, two-thirds of which can be realized by cities.

In 2020, we expect 50 billion things to be connected to the Internet, which will still be scratching the surface of what’s possible.

We know that data is doubling every two years, and according to IDC the digital universe will expand to 44 zettabytes, or 44 trillion gigabytes, annually by 2020. That’s even more staggering when you consider that today 90 percent of data is dark – it is only viewed once or not at all.

However, this explosion of data and apps – when properly optimized – presents unprecedented opportunities to better manage resources and improve quality of life. By embracing the Internet of Everything, cities across the globe can are lead the way toward a more sustainable world. Will your city be next?

Be sure to follow @CiscoIoE and join the conversation, #InternetOfEverything.

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Mobile Cloud Accelerates the Pace of Change

As organizations seek ways to maintain real-time connections with their workforce and customers in an increasingly digital and mobile-centered world, the growth of mobile cloud will be a major force in shaping the business landscape and future tech decisions. This blog series will explore how the convergence of mobility and cloud will deliver unprecedented transformation for all organizations. This post will highlight the growth of mobile cloud and how any business in any vertical stands to benefit.

Mobile communications have fundamentally changed the way business works. At the same time, cloud computing has become the new way of delivering and charging for IT services and functionality. This collision of technology -- the “mobile cloud” – stands to significantly increase the overall value of mobility, as well as radically alter the way employees work and businesses operate.

In short, what we know about mobile cloud today can be summed up in three parts:

1. Mobile cloud is growing. A leading industry report estimates mobile cloud services will increase at a staggering pace from $500 million today to $4.4 billion in 2017, a scant three years away. It’s also important to note that hybrid cloud environments are a major force in mobile cloud growth. By connecting private and public clouds, organizations can deliver the mobile, collaborative and rich video cloud services that enable today’s new connected experiences.

2. Mobile cloud is the beginning of an evolution – and it’s being driven by cloud-based applications. Mobile cloud will change not only where employees can work, but this convergence of two technology tools will completely change the way business works. A key component of this is the growth of applications in the cloud, with personalized experiences delivered in real-time, everywhere and anywhere. According to a recent Cisco study, 96% of IT decision makers said that collaboration apps are primarily accessed on mobile by employees. This behavior also supports the prediction that the percentage of enterprise apps adapted for mobile will grow from 31% to 42% in the next year.

3. Mobile cloud is a significant part of moving the Internet of Everything (IoE) forward. As people, processes and things become connected and always on the go, more data will be communicated through mobile cloud. For example, Cisco VNI data predicts that mobile cloud traffic will grow 12-fold from 2013 to 2018, a compound annual growth rate of 64 percent.

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What do predictions about 5G mean for the Future of Mobility?

With the recent exponential growth of mobile devices, it is hard not to look ahead for the next big thing that will transform technology as we know it.

One current hot topic is 5G. While most industry experts agree it is a ways off, there are obvious reasons for excitement — including how it will impact the future of mobility, the Internet of Things, and ultimately the Internet of Everything.

If 5G is all that it’s speculated to be, the mobility landscape will be in for a dramatic change , especially as businesses and organizations embrace all that 5G stands to offer such as ultra-fast network speeds and an increase in capacity.

However, while the industry grapples with understanding “just what is 5G” many experts, such as Read More »

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Fast IT Workshop #2 – Roadmap to Fast IT

As business leaders navigate an increasingly complex world of connections, they need IT to provide a programmable infrastructure that can dynamically respond to their needs. This four-part blog series explores how responsive infrastructure helps IT leaders succeed. This post will discuss what IT leaders can do now to adopt a roadmap to Fast IT.

To read the first post in this series by Colin Kincaid which introduces Fast IT, a new model for IT, click here. To read the third post in this series by Doug Webster which highlights how service providers specifically stand to benefit from Fast IT, click here. To read the fourth and final post in this series by Jeff Reed which explores how a Fast IT model can mitigate infrastructure challenges, click here.

The old way of doing things won’t work anymore for us IT professionals. The “application economy” and explosion of connected devices have increased the complexity of IT to such levels that throwing bodies at the problems won’t solve them anymore. The new Fast IT model we discussed in previous blogs enables IT departments to shift focus from spending too much time keeping the lights on to capturing the value of today’s connections and preparing for the future.

Here is an example of the CapEx and OpEx savings our own Cisco IT has achieved by following a Fast IT model.

ACI Delivers Business Outcomes | CiscoLive

Like any strategic initiative, the transition to a Fast IT model requires careful planning and change management.  In particular, organizations need to develop a plan that encompasses people, organizational processes and technologies. Once this foundational plan is in place, CIOs are then ready to begin the steps of preparing their business for Fast IT and building an organization focused on service delivery.

To assist with this process, we’ve created a four-step roadmap. Here’s a closer look at each step:

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Digital Guayaquil

At Cisco, we have identified the Internet of Everything (IoE) as the next wave of the Internet, an explosion of connectivity among people, process, data, and things. We have estimated that these connections in the IoE offer a staggering $19 trillion in Value at Stake over the next decade for both private and public sectors. And now that IoE is here, it’s important to talk about how both enterprises and public-sector organizations can take full advantage of this market transition. To help, Cisco is offering two comprehensive pieces of thought leadership to illustrate a roadmap for IoE. A Fast IT strategy helps enterprises capture their share of the IoE Value at Stake. The Internet of Everything in the Public Sector research explores how IoE is transforming government to demonstrate how public-sector organizations can capture their share of the IoE Value at Stake.

By Jordi Botifoll

Recently I had the opportunity to participate at the Mayoral Innovation Summit in Miami where I had the chance to meet several mayors from Latin America and other global cities like Miami and Barcelona to discuss how they are transforming their communities into “smart cities” through the power of innovative technology. We exchanged ideas on best practices to improve the citizen quality of life, strengthen government efficiency in urban centers, while fostering sustainable economic growth.

As part of the smart cities movement happening around the world, Cisco is releasing new study this week on the Internet of Everything value at stake for public sector that provides top 10 insights for how jurisdictions can capture IoE value. Cisco identified and profiled more than 40 public sector jurisdictions that are putting IoE in action and producing positive results. One of those jurisdictions is Guayaquil, in Ecuador.

Guayaquil is a city of 2.5 million and is visited by up to 300,000 travelers on a daily basis.   The city also experiences some educational and poverty challenges like most Latin American cities. In Guayaquil, only 44 percent of citizens have internet access through the local telecommunications companies, but its forward-thinking govermnent is investing in technology and connectivity to make Guayaquil one of the first metropolitan areas in South America to be a digital city. With help from Cisco Emerging Advisory Services, the city is expanding its public Internet access for citizens, connecting hospitals and clinics, providing e-government solutions, and investing in computers, tablets, and Internet access for public schools and universities. Guayaquil is becoming a reference for other Latin American cities. Let me summarize some of the innovations the city is pursuing to become a digital city:

The city has developed digital kiosks, public Wi-Fi areas, a telemedicine program, and an Internet education campaign to help residents of Guayaquil get the most out of all that the Internet has to offer.

The mayor of Guayaquil has a stated that his goal is to help every resident of the city become a “digital citizen,” with the intent of providing education in technology skills and encouraging entrepreneurial investment in the technology sector.

The mayor recently announced plans to develop full Internet coverage for the city in the next five years. To assist in helping increase Internet connectivity and usage, the city government is also providing tablets and laptops to students and desktops to schools.

Cisco has been instrumental in assisting Guayaquil to develop its digital kiosk system.  The kiosks provide general information about the city, as well as provide remote access to city government services so residents can conduct city business, such as pay for utility service or apply for a land-use permit.

Cisco has also been a key participant in assisting Guayaquil to develop the city’s telemedicine program involving networking the major local hospitals that are located closer to residential areas.  The network provides video conference and patient diagnostic capabilities that allow doctors to diagnose, monitor, and consult with patients who are visiting clinics located near their homes, saving travel time, improving patient access and medical monitoring capabilities.

The city has also established over 50 public Wi-Fi spots located throughout Guayaquil.  Most of these are located in educational environments, with the goal of helping students take advantage of the educational opportunities available online.  The city is also actively working to integrate technological skills into the education curriculum by providing tablets to students.

The city’s technology efforts have been extremely well received by the public in Guayaquil. The public Wi-Fi and tablets are popular among the younger generation, while the telemedicine program has been very well received by those who lack both economic and physical mobility.

I am confident several other cities in Latin America will follow Guayaquil’s example and we are working closely with big and small cities through the region to help them implement Internet of Everything strategies.

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