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Worldwide IPv6 Usage Reaches Key Threshold

This past weekend, Google’s IPv6 Statistics reported that on November 17, 2012, user activity on their websites via native IPv6 reached 1% for the very first time. This may not sound like much at first glance, but for a system like the Internet which is slated to have 19 billion active fixed and mobile network connections by 2016, even one percent of this whole marks an impressive achievement. The billions of applications, devices, routers, and switches that make up the Internet are all interconnected such that if any one doesn’t support IPv6 on a given path between the end user and the content the user is trying to reach, the system automatically falls back to IPv4. This is necessary to keep the Internet running while the upgrade occurs, but it also means that the benefits of end-to-end traffic flow over IPv6 occurs only after all the various links in the chain are all capable of supporting IPv6.

To get a better idea of how each individual piece of the deployment puzzle is advancing, Cisco has been tracking various leading indicators and regional deployment statistics. We’ve pulled these together in an interactive tool at 6lab.cisco.com where  you can view IPv6 deployment data from a variety of perspectives. With the tool you can ”mouse over” different regions of the world to see how various countries are doing in different areas. For example, by moving your mouse cursor over the United States, you can see that 57% of the networks that appear as transit for IPv4 today also support IPv6, end users as measured by Google is higher than the global average at 1.93%, and that 45% of the time the average user in the US visits an IPv6 reachable website.  You can also dig down into the methodology we are using to create the various rankings and percentages.

Moving the needle

Back in 2007 when Google began publishing its IPv6 measurements, native IPv6 deployment stood at 0.04%. Working together, the industry moved the needle 2500% over the past five years (while adding an additional billion users to the Internet during the same period). To help make this happen, two historic industry events have occurred: The World IPv6 Day in 2011 and the World IPv6 Launch in 2012. During the planning stages for the World IPv6 Launch, I had the privilege to work alongside other industry leaders and the Internet Society until agreement was reached to target three categories of participants that committed to enable production-level IPv6 by default: website operators, network operators, and home router vendors. Cisco signed on and participated as both a website operator and home router vendor.

Making a commitment is one thing, allowing a public measurement for all to see is another. For a website it is rather simple to measure IPv6 deployment as either a “AAAA” record for IPv6 exists in the public DNS system and the website can be reached from the Internet over IPv6 or not. For the network operator category we were looking for a lasting commitment together with some measurable factor that would provide reasonable proof that the network had moved beyond trials and on to production-level deployment. After much discussion, we came up with these two basic commitments for this category:

  1. IPv6 be a “normal part of business operations” for users, targeting ISPs to commit to enable IPv6 for users by default rather than on “special request”
  2. One percent of all user activity as measured by Google, Facebook, Yahoo! and Bing over IPv6 by June 6, 2012, the inaugural day of the Launch.

In practice, reaching one percent of user activity means deployment to a considerably larger subscriber base than one percent after accounting for legacy home networking gear, operating systems, and applications. For an ISP to reach this level as measured by the content providers, the “general population” of subscribers would have to brought into the deployment -- a strong indication of production-level operation and reasonable proof that the deployment was more than a trial of friendly users or beta testers.

Looking Ahead

The aim of the World IPv6 Launch was to spark a sustained growth of IPv6 usage leading up to and continuing after June 6, 2012. The continued growth since June 6 and the milestone reached this weekend is an indicator that this commitment had its intended affect thus far. The Internet Society is continuing to report measurements for World IPv6 Launch participants, and has been soliciting new members. There are quite a few Network Operators on the list now, including not only ISPs but universities and other types of networks as well. As long as a network  has its own Autonomous System number, it can be measured and potentially added to the participant list. Cisco now has its own AS (#109) on the list, making it the first in the world that is participating in all three categories of the World IPv6 Launch.

User activity as measured by Google hit 0.25% for the first time in March 2011. A year later, on March 10, 2012, it doubled to 0.5% for the first time. It’s taken about 8 months to double that again to reach 1.0% today. If this trend continues, it will double again by mid next year and could break past 10% by the end of 2014. The trend is increasingly clear: If you are a network operator, network-enabled application developer, or anyone else that works with IP and are not running IPv6 now or don’t have a plan in place to make it happen soon, now is the time to get started.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I’m a Believer; the World is Running out of IPv4 Addresses!

By Gina Nienaber, Marketing Manager, Service Provider (SP) Marketing Routing and Switching

Once again, just in case you missed it, the world is really running out of IPv4 Addresses. This time it is for real and if you are not a believer yet, you can investigate and find the second of the worlds five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) is about to run out of IPv4 addresses. News of this historic event broke last week through an Internet Society guest blog post by Axel Pawlik, Managing Director of RIPE. The blog announced we clearly have turned another page in the IPv4 history books as the Réseaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC) has begun allocating their last IPv4 /8 blocks.  If you are not familiar with RIPE NCC they are the independent, not-for-profit membership organization that supports the infrastructure of the Internet in Europe. The most prominent activity of the RIPE NCC is to act as the Regional Internet Registry (RIR) providing global Internet resources and related services (IPv4, IPv6 and AS Number resources) to members in the RIPE NCC service region.

What does this really mean?  How many addresses are left to allocate? If you’re Read More »

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The IPv6 Internet for the Next Thousand (Ten Thousand?) Years!

Today marks a huge milestone in the networking industry – the official launch by the Internet Society (ISOC) of the new IPv6-based Internet helps ensure its continued growth and impact on the world economy. This new Internet has been in the works for over two decades, including the publication of the first IPv6 standard (RFC2460) by Steven Deering of Cisco and Robert Hinden of Nokia. Since then the industry has made incredible investments in technology to reach this successful achievement including today’s official participation of over 2000 websites and 50+ network operators. According to some of our own calculations we’re estimating that 30% of the world’s web pages are now directly reachable by IPv6.

For us at Cisco on our Service Provider Marketing team, it’s been an exciting journey. We first sought to make the industry challenge imposed by the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses more widely understood by a non-technical audience. Hence our effort at some humor with Read More »

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T-Minus Zero and Liftoff! World IPv6 Launch Has Begun.

The launch of the world’s new Internet Protocol, IPv6, has started. With official participation of over  3000 website operators, 50 network operators, and multiple home networking vendors, this is the largest concerted effort to move the industry towards IPv6 ever. Building upon the success of last year’s test run on World IPv6 Day, the Internet Society, with strong support from industry leaders, decided last January not merely to test IPv6 again, but to turn it on and leave it on.

The Apollo 11 Liftoff. Photo courtesy of NASA

As with a rocket launch into space, this is a moment where the herculean efforts of individuals from across the globe have converged to set off a chain reaction of events towards a common goal. The goal in our case is nothing less than retrofitting one of the largest operational systems mankind has ever created with a new foundation to help propel the Internet to the stratospheric levels of growth and innovation the world has come to expect.

Cisco has been preparing for some time and is proud to be among the founding participants of the World IPv6 Launch. Cisco has now permanently enabled IPv6 on www.cisco.com  and has IPv6 enabled by default throughout our line of Linksys E-series home routers. We are rolling out IPv6 progressively across our own enterprise network, are leading the way in IPv6 Certifications, and our solutions for IPv6 deployment are in use by service provider and enterprise network operators across the globe. Most importantly, we will be continuing to work closely with our customers, Cisco Services, and development teams to ensure that any problems that may arise are addressed as quickly and efficiently as possible during this critical phase of deployment.

This is a giant leap forward for the Internet, but there is still much work to do in order to release our dependence on IPv4 and allow IPv6 to reach its full potential. While we now have websites representing a majority of Internet traffic advertising their IPv6 reachability to the entire world, the majority of new Internet connected devices shipping with IPv6 built-in, and more Internet Service Providers than ever before enabling IPv6 for their customers as part of normal business, we will have to fly with both protocols at the same time for several years before we get to the point where we can cut loose our first-stage IPv4 engines and soar to new heights without them weighing us down. We have certainly left the platform now though, and are on a clear trajectory toward significant and sustained growth of the Internet based on its widespread adoption of IPv6.

Congratulations to everyone who helped to make this historic launch happen. Because of your vision, dedication, and hard work, IPv6 has left the laboratory and entered the mainstream. The world has its new Internet Protocol.

www.cisco.com/go/ipv6

Read More »

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Launching a New Internet Protocol

In January 2011, Internet companies around the globe announced they would come together to perform the largest test of IPv6 deployment the world had ever seen. Cisco was among the first to proudly announce its official participation in World IPv6 Day, and after several months of preparation and an intense 24 hours in June, it was clear that we had witnessed a watershed moment in the move towards global deployment of IPv6.

So what next after this? As reports came in and logs were analyzed over the days and weeks after, it became increasingly clear that we didn’t need just another global test. Instead, we needed to enable IPv6 once and for all. So, on June 6, 2012, the industry will again unite but not just for single day. This time, we turn it on and leave it on. We’re calling this World IPv6 Launch, and it is now the largest commitment to full-scale production IPv6 deployment the world has ever seen.

For websites, the commitment is similar to last year in that reachability via IPv6 will be advertised within the global Domain Name System (DNS). This time, however, the DNS entry will remain indefinitely rather than disappear after a single day. In addition to websites, the Internet Society has setup requirements for participation by residential Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and makers of home networking equipment. The rationale for expanding to these two specific areas is that while IPv6 has been available in some models of consumer-grade networking equipment and from some ISPs for a number of years, it was very rarely enabled by default and as such very rarely in use despite the majority of internet devices being capable of IPv6.

In order to tackle these remaining barriers to deployment, new Internet subscriptions and consumer-grade home routers will begin to appear with IPv6 enabled by default as the normal course of doing business. Specifically, participating home networking equipment makers are committing to include IPv6 enabled by default through a wide range of their products (both “low end” and “high end” home routers) by June 6. For ISPs, websites will be measuring what percentage of users have IPv6 enabled, with a target of no less than 1% before the World IPv6 Launch deadline. The 1% is a “running start”, such that after June 6 we’ll be on a path of sustained growth in IPv6 deployment going forward.

Cisco is again pleased to announce its full participation and support, both by enabling IPv6 on www.cisco.com indefinitely and by enabling IPv6 by default in our new line of E-series home routers. In addition, we will be working with our customers, Cisco Services and development teams to ensure that as many companies as possible can participate and those that do are successful.

June 6, 2012. This is the year we Launch a new Internet Protocol.

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