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Collaboration and Interdependency, Anywhere

Change is afoot on a big scale and fast. We see it around us, we feel it, we talk about it, we experience it. We even know its name — the Internet of Everything (IoE).

Briefly put, IoE is a new way of connecting people, processes, data, and things.  Looking back, you can almost say that the Age of the Internet and of the Internet of Things have merely been preliminary stages designed to lead us where we are today: on a course that radically changes how we interact with the world around us. We have started on a new exciting journey. At every step we are uncovering new ways to create and share value, not just for the organizations we work for but in our personal lives as well.

Let’s take the world of business first.  It’s changing dramatically as we speak.  Here are a few leading transformational trends the effects of which I’m sure you have experienced yourselves  in one way or another.

We Are More Interdependent

Marthin_CL_Slide

More and more expert surveys are finding that employees are working more collaboratively  now than they were in the not very distant past. For instance, according to research from the Corporate Executive Board  (CEB), two thirds of employees are doing more collaborative work today than they were just three years ago.  Collaboration technology is a big part of making us increasingly effective in this environment, delivering benefits including those that help us become: Read More »

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Surprising Wisdom from Tracked Trash

The Internet of Everything portends a world filled with trillions of sensors and while their practical applications seem clear – sensing water loss, traffic patterns, the growth of forests – it’s the unforeseen knowledge that they can produce that is going to be exciting in the future.

Here’s a project that opened a few eyes: Trash Track.  Carlo Ratti directs the MIT SENSEable City Lab, which explores the “real-time city” by studying the way sensors and electronics relate to the city around us. He’s opening a research center in Singapore as part of an MIT-led initiative on the Future of Urban Mobility.

Read More »

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Moving to IPv6: Rebuilding the Heart of the Internet Without Missing a Beat

Within the coming decade, Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) will be key to enabling 50 billion connections among people, processes, data, and things in the Internet of Everything (IoE)But how we get there from here is not a simple matter.

I’m very pleased to invite Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized industry expert on IP, to discuss this important transition in the second of our three-part blog series on IPv6. The first blog in Mark’s series was “Demystifying IPv6”.

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Three years ago, I organized a conference in Paris where I thought it would be fascinating to bring together the original designers of IPv6 alongside the engineers who were finally deploying it at scale more than a decade later. During this discussion, Steve Deering, one of the “fathers” of IPv6 in the 1990s, was asked one of the most common questions about IPv6: Why wasn’t it designed for backward compatibility with IPv4? After all, wouldn’t it be easier to make the transition if the two versions could transparently coexist? Steve answered that the problem is not that IPv6 wasn’t designed to be backward-compatible—the real problem is that IPv4 wasn’t designed to be forward-compatible.

Steve was making the point that IPv4 was designed with a fixed address space. Given the number of computers connected to the Arpanet throughout the 1970s, this fixed-length address field seemed to be sufficient—at least for that version of IP. IP had been replaced before, and it seemed perfectly reasonable at the time that it might be replaced again. Read More »

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Internet of Everything (IoE) Secure Framework

This is my third blog under the  series of Internet of Everything (IoE) Security having written the Introduction, and having proposed proposed an architectural view.

To address the highly diverse IoE environment and the related security challenges, a flexible security framework is required.

Our framework is comprised of three generalized components:

  1. Authentication
  2. Authorization and Access Control
  3. Network Enforced Policy

Surrounding all three components, we specify a fourth, Secure Intelligence Operations including Visibility and Control.

cisco_framework-conceptThe components are summarized below: Read More »

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Internet of Everything: A Pivot Point in Technology — and Thinking

“You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” So said Dave Evans, Cisco’s chief futurist, in his keynote address at Cisco Live 2013.  I couldn’t agree more! As we usher in a new era of hyperconnectivity, we will see our environment in unprecedented ways, and then manage it like never before.

The trick is getting the relevant data to the right people at the correct time.

Cisco calls this transformation the Internet of Everything (IoE). With its explosion in connectivity from 10 billion things today to 50 billion in 2020, IoE promises a profound transformation that will enhance nearly all aspects of our lives.

But only if we do it right. And that requires changing the ways in which we think.

For IoE to be a true game changer, it will take much more than infusing every road, refrigerator, tire, and supermarket shelf with data-generating sensors. IoE could, for example, have a deep impact on water management. Today, 30 percent of fresh water is lost to leaking pipes. But a sensor in a pipe can only tell you that it’s losing water (and you may already have known that). The key is managing the information, tying it into control systems, and creating far-reaching, highly efficient processes for rerouting water or mobilizing maintenance resources. Read More »

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