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Survey Says: Fast IT is a Game-Changer

Over the last couple of months we have talked about Fast IT and the need to think about your IT model in a new way to thrive in the Internet of Everything (IoE).

Fast IT is the new model for IT that transforms and simplifies IT operations. It evolves and unifies infrastructure, platform, and applications to reduce complexity, accelerate service deployment, and increase security. It embraces today’s major technology transitions: cloud, mobility, and security, along with data analytics, new applications, and IoT. It addresses the requirements IT has to align to today’s business changes and organizational requirements.

In the IoE era, every company, no matter how venerable its brick-and-mortar roots, must think of itself as a technology company — creating digital capabilities that transform customer experiences, foster new revenue streams, spur productivity gains, or speed execution.

We wanted to understand the extent to which IT organizations were helping bring about this transformation to Fast IT — fulfilling a strategic role of innovation enabler — and which factors, if any, were holding them back. To this end, Cisco undertook a multipronged research effort. We engaged Global Market Insite (GMI), a division of Lightspeed Research, to conduct a comprehensive global survey on the impacts of IoE on the IT function, and the extent to which Fast IT capabilities have been addressed from both a strategic and an architectural standpoint. This soon-to-be-released research, the results of a comprehensive survey of more than 1,400 senior IT decision-makers across multiple vertical industries, provides insight into how IT can more successfully prepare for – and capitalize on – the Internet of Everything (IoE).

This quantitative research was complemented by a program of in-depth interviews with IT luminaries — leading industry analysts, authors, academics, IT executives, and practitioners themselves — on how IT infrastructure, IT economics, and organizational dynamics are changing.

As we know, the Internet of Everything—the intelligent connection of people, processes, data and things—has exploded in recent months. Alongside that growth, the pace of change across business and technology is occurring faster than ever and IT must innovate at a speed and scale to match. In order to capture the $19 trillion in IoE economic value, IT requires a new model.

Simply put: IoE requires Fast IT. And, it requires it now.

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Service Providers Can Utilize Network Virtualization to Advance Human and Economic Development

With a rapidly increasing number of people, devices, machines and sensors coming online across the Internet of Everything (IoE), global service providers will require new capabilities to lead in the delivery of value-added, cloud-based services and applications. Service providers are recognizing the importance of using intelligent, virtualized networks that efficiently deliver new experiences and expand revenue opportunities. While there are many residential, business and mobile solutions that service providers can offer, network virtualization is also crucial for deployment in developing regions.

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The IoE aims to bring the world together through technology and empower those who were once isolated, by transforming the ways they communicate. Access to mobile technology varies and may not be as prevalent in developing regions of the world. However, tablets and mobile phones are beginning to transform how these developing regions obtain and relay information. In fact, mobile phone subscriptions have climbed to nearly 5 billion in the Read More »

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Stay Ahead of Internet of Things (IoT) Traffic Demands and Maintain Your Competitive Advantage

davacostBy David Acosta, Technical Marketing Engineer

Our service provider customers like you are trying to simultaneously keep pace with the surging network traffic in today’s Internet of Things (IoT) era while providing consistently high quality of experience and introduce new services quickly for a competitive advantage.

New technologies like Voice over LTE and the need to connect the expected 37 billion devices like cars, trains, building sensors, and “wearable devices” by 2020 means that data must be treated differently than it has been historically.  At the same time, your consumers are expecting the same quality of experience whether they connect to th Read More »

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The Internet of Everything: An Opportunistic View from the Clouds

The Internet of Everything (IoE) describes machine-to-machine (M2M) compute entities that track and measure real-time data that can be used to build out a data history for analytics that could be used to optimize the quality of life. The opportunity is represented by devices used in a person’s everyday life that are connected to the Internet, have the ability to learn a person’s consumption behavior, and embody the goal to improve the efficacy of services and goods delivery and consumption. Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers says that the Internet of Everything could be a $19 trillion opportunity. 1 Read More »

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HAVEX Proves (Again) that the Airgap is a Myth: Time for Real Cybersecurity in ICS Environments

July 3, 2014 at 7:00 am PST

The HAVEX worm is making the rounds again. As Cisco first reported back in September 2013, HAVEX specifically targets supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), industrial control system (ICS), and other operational technology (OT) environments. In the case of HAVEX, the energy industry, and specifically power plants based in Europe, seems to be the primary target. See Cisco’s security blog post for technical details on this latest variant.

When I discuss security with those managing SCADA, ICS and other OT environments, I almost always get the feedback that cybersecurity isn’t required, because their systems are physically separated from the open Internet. This practice, referred to in ICS circles as the “airgap”, is the way ICS networks have been protected since the beginning of time; and truth be told, it’s been tremendously effective for decades. The problem is, the reality of the airgap began to disappear several years ago, and today is really just a myth.

Today, networks of all types are more connected than ever before. Gone are the days where only information technology (IT) networks are connected, completely separated from OT networks.  OT networks are no longer islands unto themselves, cut off from the outside world. Technology trends such as the Internet of Things (IoT) have changed all of that. To gain business efficiencies and streamline operations, today’s manufacturing plants, field area networks, and other OT environments are connected to the outside world via wired and wireless communications – in multiple places throughout the system! As a result, these industrial environments are every bit as open to hackers and other cyber threats as their IT counterparts. The main difference, of course, is that most organizations have relatively weak cybersecurity controls in these environments because of the continued belief that an airgap segregates them from the outside world, thereby insulating them from cyber attacks. This naivety makes OT environments an easier target.

The authors of HAVEX certainly understand that OT environments are connected, since the method of transmission is via a downloadable Trojan installed on the websites of several ICS/SCADA manufacturers. What’s considered a very old trick in the IT world is still relatively new to those in OT.

It’s absolutely essential that organizations with ICS environments fully understand and embrace the fact that IT and OT are simply different environments within a single extended network. As such, cybersecurity needs to be implemented across both to produce a comprehensive security solution for the entire extended network. The most important way to securely embrace IoT is for IT and OT to work together as a team. By each relinquishing just a bit of control, IT can retain centralized control over the extended network – but with differentiated policies that recognize the specialized needs of OT environments.

We’ll never completely bulletproof our systems, but with comprehensive security solutions applied across the extended network that provide protection before, during, and after an attack, organizations can protect themselves from most of what’s out there. A significant step in the right direction is to understand that the airgap is gone forever; it’s time to protect our OT environments every bit as much as we protect our IT environments.

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