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Open MPI v1.6 released

May 14, 2012 at 9:29 am PST

Marking the end of over 2 years of active development, the Open MPI project has released a new “stable” series of releases starting with v1.6.

Specifically, Open MPI maintains two concurrent release series:

  • Odd number releases are “feature development” releases (e.g., 1.5.x).  They’re considered to be stable and test, but not yet necessarily “mature” (i.e., have lots of real-world usage to shake out bugs).  New features are added over the life of feature development releases.
  • Even number releases are “super stable” releases (e.g., 1.6.x).  After enough time, feature development releases transition into super stable releases — the new functionality has been vetted by enough real world usage to be considered stable enough for production sites.

Conceptually, it looks like this:

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The Architecture of Open Source Applications, Volume II

May 8, 2012 at 10:48 am PST

AOSA 2 book cover

It’s finally out!  The Architecture of Open Source Applications, Volume II, is now available in dead tree form (PDFs will be available for sale soon, I’m told).

Additionally, all content from the book will also be freely available on aosabook.org next week sometime (!).

But know this: all royalties from the sales of this book go to Amnesty International.  So buy a copy; it’s for a good cause.

Both volumes 1 and 2 are excellent educational material for seeing how other well-known open source applications have been architected.  What better way to learn than to see how successful, widely-used open source software packages were designed?  Even better, after you read about each package, you can go look at the source code itself to further grok the issues.

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The Common Communication Interface (CCI)

April 30, 2012 at 5:00 am PST

Today we feature part 2 of 2 in a deep-dive guest post from Scott Atchley, HPC Systems Engineer in the Technology Integration Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Given the goals described in part 1, we are developing the Common Communication Interface (CCI) as an open-source project for use by any application that needs a NAL. Note that CCI does not replace MPI since it does not provide matching or collectives. But it can be used by an MPI, probably as its NAL (likewise by a parallel file system). For applications that rely on the sockets API, it can provide improved performance when run on systems with high-performance interconnects and fall back on actual sockets when not.

How does the CCI design meet the previously-described criteria for a new NAL?

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Network APIs: the good, the bad, and the ugly

April 27, 2012 at 5:00 am PST

Today we feature a deep-dive guest post from Scott Atchley, HPC Systems Engineer in the Technology Integration Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  This post is part 1 of 2.

In the world of high-performance computing, we jump through hoops to extract the last bit of performance from our machines. The vast majority of processes use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) to handle communication. Each MPI implementation abstracts the underlying network away, depending on the available interconnect(s). Ideally, the interconnect offers some form of operating system (OS) bypass and remote memory access in order to provide the lowest possible latency and highest possible throughput. If not, MPI typically falls back to TCP sockets. The MPI’s network abstraction layer (NAL) then optimizes the MPI communication pattern to match that of the interconnect’s API. For similar reasons, most distributed, parallel filesystems such as Lustre, PVFS2, and GPFS, also rely on a NAL to maximize performance. Read More »

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Hiring Linux Kernel hackers

April 22, 2012 at 7:02 pm PST

Just in case you didn’t see my tweet: my group is hiring!

We need some Linux kernel hackers for some high-performance networking stuff.  This includes MPI and other verticals.

I believe that the official job description is still working its way through channels before it appears on the official external Cisco job-posting site, but the gist of it is Linux kernel work for Cisco x86 servers (blades and rack-mount) and NICs in high performance networking scenarios.

Are you interested?  If so, send me an email with your resume — I’m jsquyres at cisco dot com.

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