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Far From Home But Not So Far From Cisco

May 17, 2011 at 9:36 am PST

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ISR Gen2 Routers Earn Multiple Government Security Certifications

May 13, 2011 at 3:03 pm PST

Cisco was recently awarded three separate government cryptographic validations in network routing for 12 of its newest Cisco Integrated Services Routers Generation 2 (ISR G2) by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), pursuant to U.S. Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-2.

The new platforms are architected to enable the next phase of branch-office evolution, providing rich mediacollaboration and virtualization to the branch while maximizing operational cost savings.

The newly validated FIPS 140-2 Level 2 Cryptographic validated products include:

For further information on Cisco’s commitment to Government Certifications, please visit our Website or participate in our social networking communities on “Facebook” or “Twitter”.

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Smart Business Architectures and the Case for Borderless Networks

May 3, 2011 at 8:15 am PST

From a talk I did at the Government Solutions Forum on “Smart Business Architectures and the Case for Borderless Networks

 

 

If you would like to follow along with the visuals, they are available on the Prezi site here.

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The Cisco Containerized Data Center: A complete “whole solution”

While traditional brick and mortar data centers meet the requirements of many IT organizations, there are some customers that require a different solution.
As the Senior Vice President, Global Government Solutions Group,  I am happy to announce today the Cisco Containerized Data Center offering for government and commercial customers.

“Containerized,” or modular data centers, offer a flexible option for organizations that need to quickly deploy new data capacity. Built into weatherized ISO containers, these solutions consist of a complete Cisco unified data center, built as a self-contained, pre-integrated environment. In response to changing, mission-critical operations, the entire container can be transported wherever it is needed.

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LISP – Locator ID Separation Protocol & IPv6

April 26, 2011 at 5:12 pm PST

Cisco Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) is routing architecture that provides new semantics for IP addressing. The current IP routing and addressing architecture uses a single numbering space, the IP address, to express two pieces of information:

  • Device identity
  • The way the device attaches to the network

The LISP routing architecture design separates the device identity, or endpoint identifier (EID), from its location, or routing locator (RLOC), into two different numbering spaces. Splitting EID and RLOC functions yields several advantages.

Check out this video for a quick review of LISP.

Although LISP was designed to deal with the route scalability problem in the Internet, it turns out is has the capability to help with the transition to IP Version 6 (IPv6), the next-generation Internet protocol.

The transition to IPv6 is an immediate challenge facing Public Sector, and specifically Federal customers today due to Government mandates and impending IPv4 address exhaustion for consumers of Government services.

Because IPv6 is not backward compatible with IPv4, and because its deployment and operation are different from that of IPv4, development and implementation of an IPv6 transition strategy is imperative. Many techniques exist to ease the transition to IPv6, and the network-based IPv6 transition techniques can be divided generally into three categories: dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6, IPv6 tunneling, and IPv6 translation.

Each approach has its features, benefits, and limitations; they are not all equivalent in terms of cost, complexity, or capabilities. Most likely, a combination of these techniques will provide the best solution. The role that the Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) being developed by Cisco and the IETF can play in IPv6 transition strategies is documented in this Whitepaper.

Incorporating LISP into an IPv6 transition strategy can simplify the initial rollout of IPv6 by taking advantage of the LISP mechanisms to encapsulate IPv6 host packets within IPv4 headers (or IPv4 host packets within IPv6 headers). For example, you can build IPv6 islands and connect them with existing IPv4 Internet connectivity.

LISP is a Cisco innovation that is being promoted as an open standard. Cisco participates in standards bodies such as the IETF LISP Working Group to develop the LISP architecture.

For further information, check the Cisco site on LISP.

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