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Ask The #InternetOfEverything Futurist: “How Will Emerging Technology Preserve and Enhance the Past?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Be sure to check out previous Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist blogs and videos about the advances of battery technology, future of smartphones, new retail models and how new solutions will integrate with our five senses.

Imagine being able to watch your entire life happen before your eyes or being able to recall specific memories and events, as to relive them the exact way they happened. As the Internet of Everything (IoE) and the network to support it evolve, our lives will be able to literally flash before our eyes.

Today, the first versions of this technology are being developed and utilized to create digital copies of landmarks and monuments. For example, cyber archivists are increasingly using a 3D data recording processes that utilizes a spinning laser on a tripod to collect millions of points of information. Once objects or monuments are fully scanned, the archivists combine the collected data with photographs and then create a virtual version that can be used in classrooms around the world or for various other applications.

Not only will we be able to create an index of digital copies from buildings, monuments and landmarks, this technology will advance to the point that we can record and organize event sequences that take place over the course of our lives. However, this information is useless unless in can be securely accessed in real-time. One point is clear, with this influx of connected people, process, data and things, the Internet of Everything depends on a stable and secure network as we make our own history come to life.

In this Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist post, I’ll answer a question from Cisco Champion, Robert Novak, who asks about what the Internet of Everything will mean for preserving our past and our building our future. Robert asks:

Question: “How do you see emerging technology being used to preserve and enhance the past?”

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Ask The #InternetOfEverything Futurist: “How Will the Future of Technology Integrate into our Five Senses?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Be sure to check out previous Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist blogs and videos about the advances of battery technology, the future of smartphones and new retail models.

Greek philosopher Aristotle first classified the five senses of human perception: sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing in De Anima, a landmark piece of work that explores how we interpret reality.

Today, Aristotle’s belief about senses still holds true: Our senses help us obtain a better understanding of the world around us. And as the Internet of Everything (IoE) connects more people, process, data and things, emerging technology and the network to support such technology is playing an increased role in our sensory development and capabilities.

New solutions that rely on haptic touch technology, sensors and real-time data transmission protocols are no longer requiring us to touch or even see technology in order for us to interact with it. These innovations coupled with the power of the Internet of Everything are creating enhanced experiences for us – and a new way of viewing, hearing, smelling, tasting and touching our world.

In today’s Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist post, I’ll answer a question from Cisco Champion Karen Woodard’s student, Kurt, who addresses this type of IoE-enabled sensory technology evolution. Kurt asks:

Question: “How will the future of technology integrate into our five senses?”

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Service Provider Network Monetization and Innovative Service Offers

Shruti's Final Portrait-1 copyBy Shruti Jain, Senior analyst, SP Thought Leadership

The latest Cisco Mobile Visual Networking Index (VNI) Forecast 2013-2018, highlights the following key trends:

  • The number of mobile users is growing: By 2018, more than 64% of the world’s population (7.6 billion people) will be mobile users.
  • The number of mobile end user devices and connections is increasing: By 2018, there will be more than 10 billion mobile-ready devices/connections--including 8 billion personal mobile devices and 2 billion M2M connections.
  • The mobile networks are becoming faster: Average global mobile network speeds will nearly double from 2013 to 2018.

So what are these ever-increasing number of mobile users doing with more devices on faster connections?  According to our analysis, mobile subscribers are using a variety of services ranging from text-based simple services to interactive multi-media mobile services such as video streaming and communications.

As mobile operators make significant investments to deploy higher performing next-generation technologies, they are coming up with innovative ideas to monetize these networks by creating new business models to offer customer value.  An example of this innovative approach is Bharti Airtel’s One Rupee Mobile Video Service, which addresses the end-user affordability issue while Read More »

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Ask The #InternetOfEverything Futurist: “In the Future, Will Clothes be Delivered to your Dressing Room in Your Size?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Given the positive feedback and the volume of questions being submitted from the community around the first series, I’ve decided to do another series to answer questions from the education and tech community around the Internet of Everything (IoE). Be sure to check out the previous Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist blogs and videos about the advances of battery technology and the future of smartphones.

As a kid, I was fascinated by the popular cartoon “The Jetsons.” Set in a futurist space community called Orbit City, the Jetson family had it all: a flying car, a household robot and a machine that helped members of the family get dressed.

Today, the technology the Jetsons used to live their life in the sky doesn’t seem too far-fetched. In fact, I’ve previously written about how close we are to seeing flying cars become a reality. We’ve also seen how the growth of the Internet of Everything (IoE) is connecting more and more people, data, things and processes – leading to a plethora of robots to clean your kitchen floors and an influx of connected things built to make our lives easier. A Cisco-powered infrastructure is what’s driving this the transition to an Internet of Everything world.

There is tremendous development in Jetsonian retail options. Online shopping via mobile devices, digital dressing room mirrors and a host of ready-to-wear connected devices (wearables) are changing how we shop and what we choose to buy. In one “Jetsons” episode, Jane and Judy Jetson use a “dress selector projection machine” to find an outfit to wear. Similar to what the creators of the Jetson’s predicted, we just beginning to see an iteration of this type of technology bring the runway to your dressing room or clothes closet. However, will this type of business model actually work?

In this Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist post, I’ll answer a question from Lauren Malhoit (@malhoit) a Cisco Champion, that points to this type of retail and fashion evolution. Lauren asks:

Question: “A recent Fast Company article mentions a retail business model where clothes are essentially delivered to you in the dressing room in your size. Do you think a model like this would work?”

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Ask The #IoE Futurist: “In an Internet of Everything World, Will the Smartphone Become Superfluous?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Given the positive feedback and the volume of questions being submitted from the community around the first series, I’ve decided to do another series to answer questions from the education and tech community around the Internet of Everything (IoE). Whether the questions are global in scope, such as how the Internet of Everything will shape our world, or small in nature, like our most recent Ask the #IoE Futurist question about batteries or today’s question about the smartphone becoming superfluous, I enjoy the challenge of answering them all.

A few weeks ago, brand new smartphones and wearable smartgear products were unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. While many of the specs and capabilities of these emerging devices vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, they all represent a common theme: mobile devices are not only becoming more present in our daily lives, but also changing how we connect, interact and share experiences.

As the Internet of Everything (IoE) drives more connected things, data, people and processes, how will the future of smartphones evolve? Will the endless possibilities for connected cars, shoes and dishwashers mean that the smartphone becomes one extra device for us to carry?

In this Ask the #IoE Futurist post, I’ll answer a question from John Spade (@DaSpadeR), a Cisco Champion, about how smartphones might change in an IoE world. Here is John’s question:

Question: “The smartphone lets us bring the Internet with us, but in the Internet of Everything, will the smartphone itself become superfluous?”

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