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Registering a Sense of FCoE Perspective: Sniffling, Scaling and Storage

January 1, 2012 at 5:00 am PST

When The Register published a conversation with Brocade on December 8 about the success of their 16Gb Fibre Channel vs. Cisco’s FCoE solutions, you just know that there were going to be several elements that were going to raise an eyebrow or two. Maybe three.

Personally, I found the comparison between Brocade’s 16G solutions and Cisco’s FCoE solutions as something of a red herring. That is, there are different reasons why a customer would want to use one tool in the toolbox versus another, but they were saying “our new jackhammer is better than their entire toolbox.”

Nevertheless, some people felt that the article was an unbalanced promotion of Brocade’s new toys. I was invited by The Register author Chris Mellor to write a response article, which I did, and then waited for it to be printed. Read More »

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Addressing the FCoE “Ready-For-Prime-Time” Question

October 20, 2011 at 7:33 am PST

My buddy Steve Foskett wrote a blog recently that talks about FCoE and 16Gb Fibre Channel. I want to say, for the record, that I like Steven, a lot, and normally I think he has a good grasp of the realities of new SAN technologies that emerge.

At the very least he has usually shown himself to be fair and balanced, even if not totally unbiased. In the many, many articles he has written I have never seen him knowingly write something to be untrue in his examination of technologies such as FCoE… until now.

For that reason, I can’t help but feel very disappointed. Read More »

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FCoE, Converging IT Teams, and… Penguins?

October 19, 2011 at 10:37 am PST

Recently flying on an airplane (which I’ve been doing a lot lately), I couldn’t help but notice the book the gentleman sitting next to me was reading.

Normally people tend to read, watch, or listen to something while on an airplane, so that wasn’t unusual, in-and-of itself. What was unusual was that this gentleman, obviously a professional businessman with grey hair and a many years of experience under his belt, was reading what appeared to be a children’s book about… penguins. Read More »

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The Napkin Dialogues: FCoE vs. QCN

July 21, 2011 at 2:49 pm PST

While at Cisco Live I had the pleasure of meeting several people who were curious about Multihop FCoE but had the unfortunate experience of getting too much misinformation from several sources (yes, including some of Cisco’s competition, but even some partners!). Some had already seen my article on FCoE and TRILL and wanted to know if I could help explain the relationship between FCoE and QCN (Quantized Congestion Notification), one of the documents in the IEEE DCB standard revision.

Even though we have a very good, short white paper on the subject, this is one of those subjects that as soon as people ask about it we break out the white boarding, or in the case of being at Cisco Live, the napkins. There are just some things that pictures help explain better.

Because of this, I’m going to try something different with this blog. It may work, or I may fall flat on my face; I suppose we shall find out. Read More »

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Converged Networks vs Mononetworks

May 22, 2011 at 1:01 am PST

In 1950 Time magazine published an article about an apocryphal story about former U.S. Senator (D-Florida) George Smathers:

According to the yarn, Smathers had a little speech for cracker voters, who were presumed not to know what the words meant except that they must be something bad. The speech went like this: “Are you aware that [opponent] Claude Pepper is known all over Washington as a shameless extrovert? Not only that, but this man is reliably reported to practice nepotism with his sister-in-law, and he has a sister who was once a thespian in wicked New York. Worst of all, it is an established fact that Mr. Pepper before his marriage habitually practiced celibacy.”

Brilliant! If you were in Pepper’s shoes, would you deny these types of charges? How can you face people who look at you with suspicion when not only are the accusations true, but can actually be the right things to do? (especially in 1950)

I love that story. Even though it’s false (Smathers reputedly offered $10,000 to anyone who could prove that he said it, an offer that went unclaimed up to his death) it provides a cautionary tale of just how someone can use an audience’s confusion against their opponents and yet still be telling the truth at the same time.

What does this have to do with Converged Networks? Read More »

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