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From the Wild West to Organized Social Business

April 19, 2011 at 3:58 pm PST

I was invited as a speaker and panelist to the B2B Social Communications Leadership Forum presented by PR Newswire and Business Development Institute. First of all, kudos to the organizers and our moderator, Michael Pranikoff (@mpranikoff) of PR Newswire. I also want to give a shout out to my fellow keynote speaker, Matt Ceniceros (@mattceni) of Applied Materials and our fellow panelists David Hargreaves (@DavidHargreaves) of Beyond and Tony Uphoff (@TonyUphoff) of UBM TechWeb.

In a nutshell, my presentation focused on how we organize social business at Cisco and how our internal social efforts have an effect on external social engagement. If you just did a double take, here is what I mean by that:

1. Defining the sand box: we encourage our employees to participate in social media but we realize that we need to do so in a way that protects both the company and individuals. You know the old saying “What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas”? The new saying should go more like “What happens in Vegas ends up on Twitter or Facebook”. Hence the need for social media governance. Our policies and guidelines are the first step for anyone at Cisco looking to engage in social media. Knowing the expectations and rules of engagement is a prerequisite.  

2. Providing the tools and know how: once a person has familiarized him-/herself with our policies and guidelines, our next step is to arm this person with various tools and resources to help him or her on his or her social journey. And being a large company, the ability to scale our education and enablement programs is critical. We look at education and enablement Read More »

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What Works with Security Risks: The Carrot or the Stick?

We just wrapped up an intense focus on security at RSA in San Francisco this past week. Thousands of IT professionals gathered from near and far to discuss the latest advances, trends, and concerns around securing our businesses. All happening against a backdrop of political unrest, from Dubai to Egypt and even to Wisconsin–projected on to the internet for all to see. At the same time, The New York Times reported that the Canadian government had been hit by a cyber-attack in early January that created an internet blackout for nearly two months. It got me thinking: As the world becomes smaller—or we gain visibility into events and occurrences not possible before—how does that impact our spheres of influence? And if cybercrime is your domain, how does this shape your thought process or approach?

Interestingly, I had the pleasure of sitting on a panel at RSA, which included Jeff Moss, Director and Founder of Black Hat and DefCon and member of President Obama’s Homeland Security Advisory Council; Tim Wilson, Editor in Chief, Dark Reading; and Eric Aarrestad, VP of Marketing, WatchGuard. Jeff provided rich commentary on the business of cybercrime from the criminals’ perspective—what’s in demand, what gets noticed, etc. And Tim provided the balance to that equation, offering a view into what his readers mostly want to know about: What are the latest threats. Makes sense, but the problem with that is that it sets up your security posture as reactive, rather than strategic.

Read More »

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Put the Word “Fan” Back into Your Facebook Fan Page

November 15, 2010 at 10:21 am PST

There is a reason for the word “fan” in “Facebook fan page”. It’s there to imply interactions with your fans, right? Well, only partially. An effective Facebook fan page not only provides a platform for business-to-fan conversations but it also helps enable fan-to-fan interactions. Last week you heard from Charlie how the Cisco Networking Academy team is using Facebook. This week’s story is about the Linksys Facebook fan page. As Brenna Karr (@BrennaNoD) Social Media specialist for the Linksys brand within Cisco Consumer Products put it so nicely: “You’re not running the conversation, you’re playing in their space. Be one of them.”

1. Know Your Target Audience…On Facebook

Understanding your target audience is one thing, but an understanding of how to provide information that is interesting and relevant to your fans on Facebook is another. Defining the purpose of your page and then creating content and engagement opportunities that suit your fans is critical to success.

2. Encourage Your Fans to Share and Comment

Corporations are starting to get the hang of asking questions on their Facebook pages to encourage conversations with their fans. This is a good thing. But what the Cisco Consumer Product team has done well is taking these conversations to the next level – by asking their fans to share their content and comment on each other’s posts. In other words, they encourage conversations amongst their fans. Encouraging fans to share content can help exponentially spread the word. And by asking people to comment, you can help create a deeper engagement which in turn gives people a reason to come back to your page. Just remember to make the call to action visible and straightforward.

3. Enable User-Generated Content

In the spirit of community enablement, the Cisco Consumer Products team introduced the “Linksys: Show Us Yours” program in the summer of 2010. This 2-month challenge targeted Twitter and Facebook  fans, Read More »

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