Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Collaboration

Four Ways Social Software Collaboration Technology Can Change Higher Education

New media and collaboration technologies have the potential to transform higher education in terms of the classroom, the learning process, the relationship between students and instructors, and how institutions conduct academic research. While much of the industry discussion revolves around use of consumer tools and social network sites like Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn, Cisco’s educational customers also see tremendous opportunity to increase student engagement and drive their own institutional strategies with “enterprise class” social software as well.

Since Cisco first announced Quad, we have had conversations with dozens of colleges and universities regarding the role enterprise social software and Cisco Quad can play in transforming education. Cisco Quad is an enterprise collaboration platform that brings people together to share ideas and content, collaborate on projects, and interact using chat, voice or video, regardless of where people are located.

Below, we’ve outlined four ways in which educational institutions are telling us enterprise social software is helping, or can transform the way learning, research, and academic advisement is crafted, delivered and consumed:

1. The 24/7 interactive classroom: Instructors often struggle to deliver a collaborative environment for their students that is secure and supports multiple access methods such as mobile.  Technology like Quad can enable students to interact in a secure, policy-based manner that extends the classroom conversation beyond physical walls. Courses partially or wholly targeted at off-campus students can similarly benefit from enhancing the class-like experience for remote students. For example, at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, the cross country MBA students based in the US, England, India and other countries are using Quad to create virtual working groups, find people with common interests, share files or videos with other students working on similar projects and instantly start video conferences or chat sessions. Quad provides students with the ability to interact, ask questions and share ideas with professors/faculty/tutorial assistants anytime, as opposed to only during fixed faculty office hours. It can also drive improved accountability on team projects, as content and comments are tracked in activity feeds and in project communities by both participating students and faculty leads.

2. Serendipitous Research: Quad contains several features, such as an activity feed that compiles microblog posts from students and staff and allows a snapshot view of a person’s current activities. These dynamic updating functionalities can facilitate broader cross-departmental collaboration, for students and researchers alike. Security features ensure that research that needs to be confidential is shared in a secure and safe manner.  As researchers update their statuses with exciting discoveries or frustrating problems, or create posts, upload videos or otherwise document their work, this content becomes accessible to hundreds of fellow university researchers through activity feeds and searches, making it possible for providential inter-disciplinary connections to be made and new insights to be generated. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Highlights from the National Town Hall for the Next Generation Workspace: Public Sector Edition

In case you missed it, you can still watch the National Town Hall for the Next Generation Workplace online

This 90-minute TeleWebcast features public sector customer best practices from federal, state and local government, and education organizations hosted via Cisco TelePresence in Atlanta, Herndon, Los Angeles, Richardson, San Jose, and Seattle.

Moderator: Steve LeSueur  
Contributing Editor, 1105 Government Information Group

Shane Milam
Director, Systems and Networks, Mercer University

 Paulette Robinson
Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning, iCollege, National Defense University

Josh Sawislak 
Senior Fellow, Telework ExchangeSenior Fellow, Telework Exchange

Jac Fagundo
Chief Technology Officer for Internal Services Department, LA County

Brooks Moore 
Manager of Technology Services, Dallas County Public Schools – Aledo

Matt Byers
Senior Systems Administrator, Seattle University

Chris Westphal
Senior Manager for Desktop Solutions Marketing, VMware

Tony Paikeday
Senior Marketing Manager for Desktop Virtualization, Cisco

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cisco Recognized for Corporate Citizenship in China

December 20, 2011 at 9:32 am PST

Just a few days ago, Cisco received China’s prestigious “2011 Best Corporate Citizenship Award,” given by 21st Century Business Herald and 21st Century Business Review, two of the country’s major media outlets. The award recognizes Cisco’s corporate social responsibility work in healthcare and education in Sichuan province.

See how Cisco is a good corporate citizen in Sichuan, China

Cisco established the Connecting Sichuan program in 2008 — after a catastrophic earthquake left nearly 5 million residents homeless, killed 70,000 people, destroyed thousands of school buildings, and cut off mobile and land-based communications, including Internet access. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

FCC Decision Opens the Door for Rural Broadband Access

December 13, 2011 at 6:37 am PST

I heard an NPR story the other day about the FCC‘s recent ruling that diverts monthly fees from rural telephone service to rural broadband service. The “Universal Service Fund” or something similar has been around since the early 20th century, charging a small fee on our phone bills to subsidize phone service for rural areas and the poor.

The newly minted “Connect America Fund” now allocates this money for mobile telephone and broadband in rural communities and needy areas. As I’ve discussed in a blog post earlier this year, access to the internet can not only offer rural U.S. citizens access to critical information, but it can provide them health care benefits that could literally save lives.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Virtues of Video

This article has been written by Jan Zanetis, Education Advocate for Cisco in Australia.  The original article was published in the December/January edition of Educational Leadership (EL). Visit EL to read the full version.

The Virtues of Video

Video-on-demand tutorials. International student collaborations. Virtual field trips to Australia. Schools can use interactive video to enrich students’ learning.

What if your struggling students could view demonstrations of difficult math concepts as often as necessary? Picture your students asking questions of an expert diver as she explores Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Or imagine a motivated student in a remote location attending an advanced placement physics class without leaving home.

Providing such enriching learning activities, even with limited funds, is no fantasy; it’s possible through live, interactive video.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,