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Grant Resources for Education Technology Innovation

September 11, 2012 at 6:30 am PST

The Huffington Post recently reported on the status of education funding in the U.S. The news was not good. According to a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, more than half of U.S. states will cut education budgets this year.

In this resource-constrained environment, taking advantage of grant resources for education technology innovation is critically important. Cisco is teaming with the Grants Office, LLC, to deliver a series of free webcasts to provide information, insights and tips on grant funding for U.S. education. Webcast topics will cover an important range of grant opportunities. Click on the links below for additional information on the grant programs covered in each session.

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Does Text Messaging Negatively Impact Student Academic Success?

Across the education landscape, student text messaging is a bone of contention among teachers. It’s not an issue in the lower grades because most K-5 schools successfully ban cell phones during school hours. Where it’s a problem is within grades 6-12, when teachers realize it’s a losing battle to separate students from their phones for eight hours.

The overarching discussion among educators is texting’s utility in providing authentic experiences to students, the type that transfer learning from the classroom to real life. Today, I’ll focus on a piece of that: Does text messaging contribute to shortening student attention span or destroying their nascent writing ability.

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Stay Connected!

August 29, 2012 at 1:57 pm PST

As Hurricane Isaac is about to make landfall on the Gulf Coast of the United States, I can’t stop thinking about Hurricane Andrew, who hit my hometown in Miami, Florida back on August 24, 1992.  Hurricane Andrew, the third costliest hurricane, costing over $26 billion, hit our neighboring city of Homestead, Florida the hardest.

The morning of August 24th, around 3am, I will always remember very clearly.  The winds were howling so loud it woke me up.  The sky was bloody red.  It looked and sounded like a really horrible scary movie.  To this day, I can never watch horror movies.

The days that followed were some of the toughest I had experienced.  My colleague Mark Rogers’ put it well in his blog he shared “Conditions were terrible”.  Looking at the devastation of Hurricane Andrew to our State, our neighbors, our home, what was in front of me was pure sadness.  After many, many weeks, school was able to resume in trailers.  On the first day back, not all of my friends returned.  I heard some decided to move away permanently while others were not ready to return.  I remembered my homeroom teacher telling us to stay connected. Read More »

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Britons get behind London 2012 legacy pledge

As a nation, we enjoyed a successful and memorable London 2012 Olympic Games and are now enjoying the start of the Paralympic Games. As London 2012 draws to a close, many will be asking what will be left for future generations to enjoy. Following the years of hard work and investment by Great Britain to put on the show that we have, it is now time to think about the future and the benefits of the Olympic Legacy.

To gain better insight into exactly what the British public expect in terms of legacy, we conducted a survey to ask what is important to them personally. The results revealed that over half of Britons surveyed (62%) believe that the Games will benefit UK business in the long term and create a lasting legacy for the country. An impressive 60% of those surveyed also confirmed that they believe the Games may help to improve technology and innovation in the UK, inspiring entrepreneurship within the sector and helping to build a brilliant future for Britain and industry moving forward.

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The Flipped Classroom

Just been reading a white paper from Cisco about the Flipped Classroom -- linked here for download FlippedClassroomWhitepaper_D8_V5.

The paper describes how the teaching and learning model used around the world today has it roots in the 18th century.  This is based the premise that lessons are delivered in real time by teachers and lecturers and then students do further study and review the content.  Following is an extract from the paper which sets the scene.

“For the first 19 years of his career in education, Jon Bergman–like most educators–rarely had the time to speak to more than a few students each day in his high school chemistry classes. His teaching model followed the conventions established generations ago: Standing at the front of his classroom, he delivered lectures to students who furiously scribbled notes. He presented homework each evening, which was briefly reviewed the next day in class before beginning a new lab. Students who quickly grasped the concepts Bergman presented did well enough on tests to pass his class; those who struggled or were reticent to ask for help did not.
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