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The Three Mega Trends in Cloud and IoT

A consequence of the Moore Nielsen prediction is the phenomenon known as Data Gravity: big data is hard to move around, much easier for the smaller applications to come to it. Consider this: it took mankind over 2000 years to produce 2 Exabytes (2x1018 bytes) of data until 2012; now we produce this much in a day! The rate will go up from here. With data production far exceeding the capacity of the Network, particularly at the Edge, there is only one way to cope, which I call the three mega trends in networking and (big) data in Cloud computing scaled to IoT, or as some say, Fog computing:

  1. Dramatic growth in the applications specialized and optimized for analytics at the Edge: Big Data is hard to move around (data gravity), cannot move data fast enough to the analytics, therefore we need to move the analytics to the data. This will cause a dramatic growth in applications, specialized and optimized for analytics at the edge. Yes, our devices have gotten smarter, yes P2P traffic has become largest portion of Internet traffic, and yes M2M has arrived as the Internet of Things, there is no way to make progress but making the devices smarter, safer and, of course, better connected.
  2. Dramatic growth in the computational complexity to ETL (extract-transform-load) essential data from the Edge to be data-warehoused at the Core: Currently most open standards and open source efforts are buying us some time to squeeze as much information in as little time as possible via limited connection paths to billions of devices and soon enough we will realize there is a much more pragmatic approach to all of this. A jet engine produces more than 20 Terabytes of data for an hour of flight. Imagine what computational complexity we already have that boils that down to routing and maintenance decisions in such complex machines. Imagine the consequences of ignoring such capability, which can already be made available at rather trivial costs.
  3. The drive to instrument the data to be “open” rather than “closed”, with all the information we create, and all of its associated ownership and security concerns addressed: Open Data challenges have already surfaced, there comes a time when we begin to realize that an Open Data interface and guarantees about its availability and privacy need to be made and enforced. This is what drives the essential tie today between Public, Private and Hybrid cloud adoption (nearly one third each) and with the ever-growing amount of data at the Edge, the issue of who “owns” it and how is access “controlled” to it, become ever more relevant and important. At the end of the day, the producer/owner of the data must be in charge of its destiny, not some gatekeeper or web farm. This should not be any different that the very same rules that govern open source or open standards.

Last week I addressed these topics at the IEEE Cloud event at Boston University with wonderful colleagues from BU, Cambridge, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Stanford and other researchers, plus of course, industry colleagues and all the popular, commercial web farms today. I was pleasantly surprised to see not just that the first two are top-of-mind already, but that the third one has emerged and is actually recognized. We have just started to sense the importance of this third wave, with huge implications in Cloud compute. My thanks to Azer Bestavros and Orran Krieger (Boston University), Mahadev Satyanarayanan (Carnegie Mellon University) and Michael Stonebraker (MIT) for the outstanding drive and leadership in addressing these challenges. I found Project Olive intriguing. We are happy to co-sponsor the BU Public Cloud Project, and most importantly, as we just wrapped up EclipseCon 2014 this week, very happy to see we are already walking the talk with Project Krikkit in Eclipse M2M. I made a personal prediction last week: just as most Cloud turned out to be Open Source, IoT software will all be Open Source. Eventually. The hard part is the Data, or should I say, Data Gravity…

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Hitchhiker’s Guide for Service Providers at Cisco Live Orlando

Amrit Hanspal Formal photoWritten by Amrit Hanspal, Sr. Product Manager, Service Provider Segment Lead, Network OS Tech Group

Cisco Live at Orlando in 2013 offers a host of opportunities if you are a service provider or a large enterprise that offers services to internal groups. Watch out for the following five key areas and the respective speaking sessions when it comes to software capabilities of the Routing & Switching platforms—(1) IPv6, (2) SDN, (3) Core IP & Optical, (4) Ethernet Access & Aggregation and (5) IP Routing.

IPv6

June 2012 officially marked the IPv6 Internet with the World IPv6 Launch led by the Internet Society. Within the first six months, IPv6 traffic broke the 1% threshold and established the fact that IPv6 had moved from an experiment to mainstream phase with US traffic approaching close to 3%. Join us for a discussion on where IPv6 is headed (Session ID: PSOSPG-1330) — new opportunities for IPv6 with Internet of Everything. We will be delighted to share our experiences deploying IPv6 (Session ID: PNLCRS-2303) as our IPv6 gurus highlight deployment best practices and real-world challenges. For those of you in Networking, we got you covered with the Troubleshooting IPv6 session (Session ID: BRKRST-2304).

See full list at http://www.slideshare.net/getyourbuildon/ipv6-at-cisco-live-orlando

SDN--Software Defined Networking Read More »

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Cisco Wins Six Awards at Interop Tokyo 2013, Top Honors for New CRS-X

cisco-crx-xThis blog shares some terrific news from my colleagues in Japan. Cisco took six awards at Interop Tokyo 2013 last week, including the top prize for Service Provider/Carrier segment with our new CRS-X core router which launched last week.

  • CRS-X Grand Prix in SP/Carrier segment
  • Nexus 6000 Grand Prix in DC segment
  • Cisco CGR Grand Prix in IoT/M2M segment
  • Cisco CMX Grand Prix in ShowNet Demo segment
  • Cisco Nexus 1000V InterCloud Special Award in Cloud Platform segment
  • Cat3850 Special Award in Enterprise networking

The breadth of these wins – across Read More »

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Alcatel-Lucent’s New Core Router: Contender or Pretender?

Cisco in the Hot Seat Addressing Alcatel-Lucent’s  Core Network Offering

Service provider core networking has been a very difficult market segment for technology providers to penetrate based on its importance to global service providers and because it requires costly, ongoing innovation and investment to meet ever-changing customer requirements. While many vendors have attempted to enter this market – Avici and Caspian Networks come to mind – most have failed. In fact, Alcatel introduced a product in this space in the 2000s with the 7770. It was unsuccessful and ultimately discontinued.

While Cisco continues to be No. 1 in the core, we are not sitting on our hands by any means.  In fact, our innovation engine is in high gear, and we are confident that we’ve got the right strategy to lead our customers into the next decade and beyond. Our architectural approach was designed to enable the best delivery of video and mobility by leveraging the network intersection points of the cloud, network, and client.

Recently, Read More »

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Manufacturing a Successful Cloud Strategy

I just finished an interview on the topic of “Cloud in Manufacturing” with a German machine-building and factory automation magazine. The interview ran an hour longer than scheduled—an indication of the publication’s interest, as well as its lingering doubts about whether cloud services truly can benefit “real manufacturing.”

We discussed an abundance of cloud-related ideas – most pertaining to obvious areas such as web presence in marketing, after-sales application hosting to make field engineers more productive, and collaboration as a service to enable partners and suppliers to work together more effectively on large projects.

The uncharted cloud territory, however, is the area that manufacturers see their “core”: the physical making of things. Can cloud play a role in supply chain management (yes, it can)? Will there be a cloud service for motion control (due to latency and determinism considerations, not yet) and for asset management and MIS applications (yes)? Read More »

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