Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Mobility

Cisco Meraki Systems Manager Extends Enterprise Mobility Management to the Cloud

The industry is going beyond BYOD—it’s not just about simply connecting the device anymore: the mobile landscape has grown to include apps, devices and content, all of which require security and management. This is no easy task. Enterprise mobility management (EMM) is no longer a nice-to-have for our customers—it is a necessity. You need a mobile strategy.

We at Cisco have been steadily building out our mobility portfolio across infrastructure, policy and management over the past few years to provide our customers with what they need to get ahead of the mobile trend.

It has always been Cisco’s strategy to use open API’s with ISE to integrate with host of 3rd party EMM vendors, including Citrix, MobileIron, Airwatch and many more. We are now extending that flexibility to create a cloud-managed EMM offering with our Cisco Meraki solution.  The latest addition to the Cisco mobility portfolio, the Cisco Meraki Systems Manager Enterprise is an evolution of Cisco Meraki’s existing MDM cloud offer, and a natural extension of the Cisco Meraki network management solution (e.g. extending management of wireless access points to the management of devices connecting to the enterprise domain).

Cisco is committed to customer choice, and will continue to offer different options to the market, including ecosystem EMM partner solutions. The addition of the Cisco Meraki Systems Manager broadens that portfolio to strengthen our offering and empower our customers attain the mobility solution best suited for their specific requirements.

For more information on the Cisco Meraki Systems Manager, read the full announcement blog here.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Filtering Explicit Content

Many web sites provide a setting to reduce the amount of explicit, or objectionable, content returned by the site. The user configures these settings, but many users are unaware such a setting exists, or that it needs to be set for each web site. Additionally, the security administrator cannot audit that users have configured the setting. As a result, users can be exposed to objectionable content or can inadvertently trigger filtering of objectionable content on the Cisco security service (Cisco WSA or CWS), sometimes causing uncomfortable questions from human resources or from management.

An emerging standard defines a new HTTP header, “Prefer: Safe,” which does not require the user to configure each web site. This feature is implemented by Firefox, Internet Explorer 10, and Bing. We anticipate more clients and more content providers will support this emerging standard.

Both Cisco Web Security Appliance (WSA) and Cloud Web Security (CWS) support this emerging standard, and can be configured to insert this header on behalf of HTTP and HTTPS clients. In this way, the security administrator can cause all traffic to default to avoiding explicit or objectionable content, without relying on users to configure their browser or to configure each visited web site.

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Internet of Everything Is the New Economy

We have only seen a glimpse of what Internet of Everything (IoE) has in store for the planet. The change is much bigger than technology alone. The new IoE economy will profoundly affect people, things, data, and processes.

Find out more in this short video, based on my article, The Internet of Everything Is the New Economy Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reducing Data Center Power Demand with Cisco UCS

Look at the operating costs for your data centers and you’ll likely see a big amount for the electrical power to run the servers, storage, networking components, and cooling systems. Since power consumption is an area where even small changes can add up to big savings over time, we want to take advantage of every power-saving feature we can find. And we’ve found many of those features in the Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS) servers, which we now deploy as the standard in our data centers worldwide.  Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

How Virtualization Is Changing Software Licensing for the Data Center

Erich Latchford

In the days before data centers were virtualized, the licensing model for operating systems and application software was simple: 1 server = 1 license. But this model doesn’t work in an environment where a single physical server can host multiple virtual servers.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,