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Inside One Asian City’s Strategy

Busan is at the forefront of something big.

As South Korea’s second-largest metropolitan city, Busan boasts a population of about 3.6 million, and is home to a slew of major companies, government agencies, universities, annual festivals, and conferences. Busan is the country’s largest container-handling port, and the fifth- largest in the world. Like other metropolitan areas, the city struggles with managing terrible traffic congestion and the attendant high logistical costs; maintaining job-creation momentum for the 60,000 high-quality and high-skill job seekers who graduate from area universities each year; and meeting the demand for an innovative city operations system that helps ensure global competitiveness.

Cisco IBSG has been working with Busan’s Metropolitan Government to develop plans for a “u-City.” U, in this case, stands for “ubiquitous,” which also describes the city’s broadband penetration. Busan’s “smart and connected” urban communities use the network as a platform—on top of which it can deploy innovative urban-planning solutions and city management services. The city uses the network to connect, process, and share information efficiently, and in real time. Read More »

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The Enterprise’s Inclination to Private Cloud

By Uwe Lambrette, Director of Service Provider Solutions, Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG)

Cisco IBSG’s recent interviews with about 45 enterprise CIOs and architects clearly revealed that enterprises have a preference for private cloud. They want to maintain control over their IT, especially where the architecture is new and skills need to be built. In addition, they are not comfortable with accepting externally provided cloud solutions (although there are certainly exceptions).

At the same time, the survey indicated that once enterprises have gained private-cloud experience, they are more willing to allocate this architecture to an external provider.

This is reminiscent of the classic outsourcing
 cycle, where corporate functions are moved externally once they have become a commodity.

This trend has Read More »

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3 C’s of Cloud Adoption – Cost

In my previous blogs confine and clover, I spoke about determining the scope of your business problems as well as defining your measures of success when planning a Cloud solution. Now, I would like to help you understand both the cost you will incur for the work necessary to achieve your defined cloud goals and how to avoid unexpected fees.

Because of all the hype around Cloud, we hear (sometimes disproportionately) about how Cloud can transform your business. However, the cost of that transformation is often not fully understood. Careful planning and awareness can save you money along the Cloud journey. Be aware of and consider the following hidden costs:

Read More »

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Friday Poll: Have You Gone Rogue at Work?

Has this guy gone rogue?

Has this guy gone rogue?

A recently published report by Rackspace found 43% of IT Decision makers knew of people within their company who had used cloud services outside of their IT department’s purview. Meanwhile, PricewaterhouseCoopers recently estimated that between 15% and 30% of IT spending occurs outside the IT department’s budget.  PwC called this behavior, ‘Shadow IT’ while the Rackspace report calls it, ‘Rogue IT’. Whatever you call it, employees are feeling empowered to think outside their IT box.  When they need to get something done and the provided resources don’t meet their needs employees are finding ways to get it.

This isn’t exactly a new phenomenon, but the numbers of IT who know and the budget estimations are interesting to note.  Of course, I got to wondering about our readers. This week’s poll is simple – have you gone rogue with your IT?* Read More »

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3 C’s of Cloud Adoption – Clover

Last week, I introduced my concept of the 3 C’s of Cloud: Confine, Clover, and Cost and began outlining a simple strategy for maximizing your benefits during the process of adopting a cloud solution by confining the scope of your business problems. What comes next?

Let’s now talk about the second of my “C” concepts—Clover.

Before you can ‘roll in the clover’ of a successful cloud implementation you need to address one of the most common pitfalls to success: failing to build an appropriate business justification for migrating to cloud. If you enter the process with the attitude that “I’ll just experiment with this new Cloud thing and see what happens; maybe it will give me what I need,” you may not end up ‘in clover’ but in the weeds. So, what do you need to do?

Read More »

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