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Using the Cloud To Adapt and Thrive in a Rapidly Shifting Financial Marketplace

Lower margins resulting from both the commoditization of transaction economics and the high cost of supporting IT-intensive infrastructures are putting tremendous pressure on financial-market companies. This is causing many firms to rethink their business models to create new revenue streams—and reduce costs—across traditional functions such as pre-trade analytics, risk management, and post-trade reconciliation. These functions are now seen as critical business processes that can be “shifted and lifted” into a cloud-enabled service delivery model.

Key enablers of success will include the development of new cloud operating models and strategic sourcing capabilities delivered via networked services. This will provide financial-market companies with greater business agility, and a path for effectively shedding capital-intensive assets from balance sheets for re-investment in new innovations and for producing positive company valuations.

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The World of Many Clouds

Cloud – the combination of computing, networking, storage and management – fundamentally changes the way businesses deliver services to improve economics and flexibility.

While the notion of “the Cloud” is often thought of as a single entity, in fact, there are many types of clouds: private clouds, public clouds, hybrid clouds, and even interconnected communities of clouds serving different verticals, like government, health care or finance. Indeed, we live and work in a world of many clouds.

Cisco’s CloudVerse enables this world of many clouds by delivering: Read More »

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Should manufacturing embrace the cloud?

November 30, 2011 at 5:21 pm PST

Cloud Computing: you’ve heard of it, but how will it affect you as a manufacturer? Is it the right solution for your industry or not?

Cisco has released its recent Global Cloud Index projections which state that Cloud Traffic will increase 12-fold between 2010 and 2015.

The Cisco Cloud Index covers three crucial areas focused on data center and cloud traffic trends and next-generation service or application adoption. They include: Read More »

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The Network Effect

To celebrate our first anniversary of the CLE blog we produced a web documentary series on the impact of the telecom network, hosted by Dr. Steven Shepard.  We’ll share stories about the network’s pioneers, the impact it has today in growing the economy especially in developing regions, and possibilities it holds for the future.

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What provisioning the Cloud infrastructure and cooking have in common…

What provisioning the Cloud infrastructure and cooking have in common…

 

I like to cook. Sometimes, I’ll grab whatever ingredients I have on hand, put them in a Dutch oven, throw in a few spices, and make a delicious casserole that can never be repeated. At other times, I’ll follow a recipe to the letter, measure and weigh everything that goes in, and produce a great meal that I can repeat consistently each time.

When provisioning servers and blades for a Cloud infrastructure, the same 2 choices exist: follow your instinct and build a working (but not repeatable) system, or follow a recipe that will ensure that systems are built in an exacting fashion, every time. Without a doubt, the latter method is the only way to proceed.

Enter the Cisco Tidal Server Provisioner (an OEM from www.linmin.com) , an integral component of Cisco Intelligent Automation for Cloud and Cisco Intelligent Automation for Compute. TSP lets you easily create “recipes” that can be easily deployed onto physical systems and virtual machines with repeatability and quality, every time. These recipes can range from simple, e.g., install a hypervisor or an operating system, to very complex: install an operating system, then install applications, run startup scripts, configure the system, access remote data, register services, etc.

Once you have a recipe (we call it a Provisioning Template), you can apply it to any number of physical systems or virtual machines without having to change the recipe. Some data centers use virtualization for sand box development and prototyping, and use physical servers and blades for production. Some data centers do the opposite: prototype on physical systems, then run the production environment in a virtualized environment. And of course, some shops are “all physical” or “all virtual”. Being able to deploy a recipe-based payload consistently on both physical and virtual systems provides the ultimate flexibility. Yes, once you’ve created a virtual machine, you’ll likely use VMware vSphere services to deploy, clone and move VMs, but as long as you’re using TSP to create that “first VM”, you have the assurance that you have a known-good, repeatable way of generating the golden image. When time comes to update the golden image, don’t touch the VM: instead, change the recipe, provision a new VM, and proceed from there.

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