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The #InternetOfEverything Machine and What it Means to the World

Typically art and technology make strange bedfellows. But the Internet of Everything Machine at Cisco Live San Francisco in June was undeniably one of the coolest interactive installations I’ve seen at a conference. The exhibit simulated an attendee’s journey through a city connected by real-time data, so each visitor got a unique and personalized digital city experience. More importantly, it demonstrated how the Internet of Everything will help a city run more efficiently and the positive impact that can have on citizens.

From streetlights that turn themselves off to save energy and recycling bins that communicate when they’re full, to self-adjusting traffic lights that prevent traffic jams and smart luggage that tracks itself – the possibilities are endless.

The Internet of Everything Machine was a temporary exhibit at Cisco Live, but the Internet of Everything is becoming our reality. While it is certain to shape our future, it’s also in action today. The Internet of Everything (IoE) is not a tangible item. Rather, it is the connections between people, process, data and things that create more valuable and relevant experiences than any of us could have ever imagined before.

Ioe Machine Erica Schroeder 8.7.14

Many elements that make up the Internet of Everything are not new and each can function independently. But, the true power of the Internet of Everything lies in all of them working together to create richer experiences and economic opportunities for everyone – businesses, individuals and even countries.

For example, a recent economic analysis estimates the Internet of Everything represents a $19 trillion opportunity for public and private sector organizations over the next decade. This occurs from cost savings, productivity gains, new revenue and improved citizen, worker and consumer experiences.

The Internet of Everything makes our everyday lives more convenient. Our ability to make payments from our smart devices, a store associate using a hand-held device to expedite checkouts and even one day riding in a self-driving car are all innovations made possible by the Internet of Everything.

The Internet of Everything Machine gave Cisco Live attendees a glimpse into a concept city that could run seamlessly with the Internet of Everything. And all over the world, corporations, municipal agencies and individuals have used it to improve their operations and even their health:

  • In Dubai, one of the world’s fastest-growing and cosmopolitan cities, cranes that swing too close to one another are halted by an Internet-connected system, safeguarding a network of 37 cranes and 5,000 workers near the world’s tallest buildings.
  • Though many of its operations take place deep inside mountains, Dundee Precious Metals utilizes WiFi-enabled vehicles, haulers and crushers and above-ground command centers to capture real-time data, resulting in a cost-savings of $2.5 million and production increase of 400%.
  • Wearables have made great strides in improving healthcare and have the potential to save lives when seconds count. Already, 21% of Americans use wearable devices to help track health data. What’s even more exciting for the medical field and patient care is that wearables can be outfitted with technology that allows them to communicate with doctors and other healthcare professionals directly. A Band-Aid that indicates if a wound is healed, skin patch wireless blood glucose monitors and systems that sound an alert when it’s time to refill a prescription are all possible through the Internet of Everything.
  • New York, a burgeoning “Smart City” has partnered with City 24x7 to make public communications available to anyone, anytime, anywhere with their Smart Screens. These screens are interactive and highly-visible in area train stations, malls and sport facilities and transmit offers, services and area information in real-time. And, they can be accessed via smartphones, tablets and laptops!

Through these few examples it’s easy to see that the Internet of Everything’s societal and enterprise advances are making a real impact. The Internet of Everything is changing everything about the way we live and the ways we can live. There will be challenges, but as John Chambers noted, overcoming them will take precedence, because the benefits are far too great to ignore.

Dream big – what are some of the innovations you’d like to see the Internet of Everything make possible? What does your City of Tomorrow look like? We want to know what examples of the Internet of Everything you see in your own City of Tomorrow – your neighborhood! Join the conversation online by tagging your photo and video examples with #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

Be sure to follow @CiscoIoE on Twitter and join the conversation, #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

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Punch the Data Center Accelerator and Maintain Full Control

Every organization needs more from their data centers, such as faster services and data analysis for real-time decision making.  The unprecedented expansion of data is a major driver of rapid data center transformation.  Consider these statistics:

  • 90% of all data in the world was created in the last three years
  • Data centers handled 214 exabytes of data per month in 2012 and that is expected to grow to 644 exabytes per month by 2017

Just trying to image 214 exabytes of data is like trying to imagine how much money a trillion is.  Bottom line:  it is a lot of data!

Given that upward of 70% of what data centers do today is still about processing data, and IT budgets are at best flat, organizations have to become more efficient.  They need newer, better ways to process data and deliver data center services, increase application performance and increase operational efficiency.

Cisco understands this problem.  The combination of Cisco UCS Director and UCS Invicta allows your organization to deliver services faster, increase application performance and deliver those operational efficiencies everyone is seeking.   We created a nice video illustration to explain:

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Indoor Wi-Fi Location and Beacons: Better Together Part 2

wifibeaconLocation-based services have been getting a lot of attention lately and people are increasingly curious about how Wi-Fi and beacons play together in the hot space that is indoor location technology. In my last blog I reviewed how beacons work and how to differentiate when to use Wi-Fi and beacons. There’ve been some great questions about beacon technology and how it complements Cisco’s location-based Connected Mobile Experiences (CMX) solution, so I want to follow up on these topics with everyone.

What types of beacons are there?

Generally, there are two different classes of beacons: transmit only and backhaul enabled.

Transmit only beacons are exactly as they sound -- they simply transmit information to anyone that is capable of hearing (bluetooth enabled smartphones). They do not receive or pass any data or information upstream.

Apple’s iBeacon is the best example of this type of BLE beacon. You can think of them like the navigational beacons used by airplanes when on approach to major airports. The beacon doesn’t even know the plane is there, but the plane is aware of the beacon and knows where the beacon is allowing it to take the correct action. Same is true for smartphones and transmit only beacons like iBeacon -- the intelligence is located in the mobile application which must recognize the beacon and take appropriate action.

Backhaul enabled beacons generally include a Wi-Fi chipset for either management or data capabilities. Some backhaul enabled beacons are USB enabled and take advantage of whatever connectivity exists within the PC they are connected. Read More »

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Analytics: A New Model for Creating Great, Personalized Customer Experiences

While certainly exciting, buying a new house, can also serve as a revealing exercise in understanding data science.

A couple of weeks ago I went to my bank to investigate my financial options for buying a new house. To my surprise, my account manager gave me a stack of paperwork to fill out—and I soon realized that my bank was already in possession of 90 percent of the information I was being asked to provide. So why was I having to take the time to fill in information the bank already had, or could easily acquire?  And more importantly, why couldn’t my account manager quickly access information about my client status and my personal preferences, and immediately provide a tailored offering, decreasing the chance that I would look elsewhere for this service?

Figure 1. Centralized, Decentralized, and Distributed Networks. A distributed, virtualized approach to database management enables quick combination and analysis of large volumes of data—where and when it is needed.

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Source: Paul Baran, Rand Corporation.

I wrote in one of my recent blogs about the issues and solutions related to quickly combining data that comes in large volumes by focusing on data virtualization and cloud. This can enable seamless customer interactions and decrease client churn, be it in financial services or in the telecom sector. But what is required at an organizational level so that people, process, data, and things come together to enable a superior customer experience and create entirely new revenue possibilities?

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123Net Expands Connectivity in Michigan

August 6, 2014 at 11:10 am PST

AR13993Written by Dan Crawford, Marketing Manager

Customers demand their Internet to always be on, and service providers -- especially those serving businesses -- strive to meet this with “five nines” of availability. That is to say they aim for a service level that only allows for about 5 minutes per year of downtime. Achieving such  performance is no simple task, but is a key differentiator for 123Net, a Michigan based company offering premium voice, data, and colocation infrastructure services.

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As 123Net has built out a 2400+ mile fiber network powered by Cisco optical technology. Most Read More »

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