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Deliver Services at Internet Speed

How quickly can your organization stand-up a new application or deploy new services?  Most customers tell me, “not fast enough!”   I am clearly hearing from them that the new standard expectation across the organization is to receive precise data center resources in “internet time,” easily and definitely on-demand.

But customers are not the only ones affected by these new expectation standards.  Application developers also expect to receive the resources they need to support their efforts within one hour — without a lot of process meetings and repetitive, slow paperwork.  They want what they want, when they need it, which is always now!  Can’t get it now?  Out comes the credit card and they go on a shopping spree to outside resources.

Developers don’t worry about security, governance or quality of service.  If you are in operations, or you’re a C-level executive, you care.  You need to meet compliance guidelines.  So how can you get everyone on the same team, working together so the organization can succeed, the old “win-win-win?”

At CiscoLive Milan in January, we introduced the Cisco ONE Enterprise Cloud Suite. Watch this replay of our live broadcast.

 

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Solving Manufacturing Complexities through Data Analytics: Part Two – Implementing Data Analytics

Data analytics has been an integral part of manufacturing management for most of its history. However, analytics has undergone both evolutionary and revolutionary changes over the decades with the advent of information technology and digital data gathering and analysis. In Part One of this series, I took a look at the evolution behind data analytics and applications in Manufacturing. Part Two provides insights into implementation of analytics in manufacturing.

Part Two: Implementing Data Analytics in Manufacturing

Acquiring Data

The first step for data analytics in manufacturing should be to implement solutions that connect manufacturing equipment, sensors and controllers to a converged network so data can be captured, moved and stored for analysis in an appropriate manner. While manual data entry is common and will probably continue to some extent, automation is critical to ensure that data is captured in real time, accurately and in the right format to enable analytics and decision making.

The amount of data available on the manufacturing plant floor has increased by many orders of magnitude over the past decade, however analysis and application of such data in decision making has not kept pace. It is this space of analytics that is now driving adoption of ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) technologies such that IoT and analytics have now become intricately linked to each other.

Going beyond just analyzing data from IoT and expanding it to include the impact of this data on the people, skills, business processes and linking all of these disparate elements into a single business-focused system is referred to as the ‘Internet of Everything’ (IoE). Manufacturers are only now just starting to take this wider perspective to analytics and the application of analytics in manufacturing. As manufacturers begin to rely more on data for analysis into business processes, they must also consider some challenges that may arise during implementation.

Virtualizing the Data

Today’s manufacturers need the ability to integrate all data from various departments/locations, which has proven to be difficult in the past. The old approach consisted of building a data warehouse where data was extracted from multiple sources, transformed (normalized, processed, condensed) and loaded on a periodic basis into a central data warehouse. Today’s manufacturers need data that can be used in real-time to make decisions, not data stored in a warehouse for historical analysis. A steep increase in the use of cloud storage for such data warehouses has led to data being stored across different clouds (mix of public and private) on different platforms. Bringing all of this together to yield meaningful results without moving all the data physically into one data warehouse has been a challenge. Data virtualization solutions now enable accessing data that is physically in different databases and geographic locations as if it were physically in a single data warehouse. This has becomes even more critical with the large volumes of big that are typically unstructured and not easily amenable to traditional data warehousing approaches.

Integrating analytics into business processes

Data analytics cannot be a standalone activity done in a data center by a team of experts. It has to be integrated into the key business processes such that analytics are focused only in areas that provide business value and are available to decision makers at the right time in the right place. Important questions to be considered when implementing analytics solutions are:

  • How will the data be used?
  • Who will use it and how often?
  • What kind of analysis is needed?

Responses to these questions will define your strategy and dictate how analytics are integrated into the business. Implementation models could include

  • Data acquisition from sensors and analytics at the ‘Edge’ to feed-back to control system or human operator. The data is acquired and moved to a computing platform on the switch (in the manufacturing cell network) or to a data center in the manufacturing plant where it is processed and the result is used to drive the manufacturing process through control signals or visual / audio signals through the Human Machine Interface (HMI). Example would be a high definition camera taking 3D images of the product and comparing it to standards to identify quality defects in real time to eject the defective product or stop the machine or just sound an alarm via the HMI for the operator to take action.
  • Data capture from sensors and equipment for periodic reporting. The data is acquired, moved to a data center and analysis / reporting is done in conjunction with other databases on a periodic basis. Application would be machine uptime and speed data acquired in real time and used to report Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) in conjunction with data like product mix, raw material / packaging source etc to identify performance issues and improve OEE.
  • Adhoc analysis of data acquired from sensors, done offline, after data has been normalized and moved to a data center. Typical use case would be analysis in support of six sigma/quality improvement projects where data gathered from the machine / production system is analyzed to support (or reject) hypotheses for problem resolution by shop floor employees.
  • Data capture and streaming out to equipment vendor in real time (machine as a service) where the machine vendor monitors performance of the machine parts and is able to take remote corrective action or schedule predictive maintenance or bring in appropriate spares just-in-time to ensure machine up-time and performance per contractually agreed levels. In such cases, security becomes a key issue too.

Implementation challenges

Implementation of data analytics should consider the following:

  1. Appropriate manufacturing cell and zone network to ensure high speed, quality of service and reliability. This is absolutely critical and is a huge challenge for manufacturers give the proliferation of standards and protocols in use on the shop floor and the lack of convergence of the networks.
  1. Moving and storage of data and location of the data center. This becomes very critical when handling big data in large volumes and high velocity and the decision on whether data center should be co-located in the manufacturing plant or remote/cloud can drive performance and cost of the solution.
  1. A comprehensive strategy and implementation approach focused on the entire data chain and not just on the final analytics and visualization. Typically analytics is seen as using algorithms on data and developing reports/visualization with little focus on acquisition, movement, storage and organization of the data. What appears in the user interface is the most visible but not necessarily the most important or most challenging aspect of implementation.

How can Cisco help your manufacturing organization improve efficiencies and gain valuable insight through data? Visit our solutions page to find out more and share your thoughts with us in the comments section below. Stayed tuned for Part Three of this series where I will share experiences in implementation and detail how analytics and IoT are working together to bring results in manufacturing.

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Making sense of Service Provider Virtualization

nehib-1Guest blog by Greg Nehib, SP Product and Solutions Marketing

I like to think of virtualization as an expanded networking toolkit, providing us with additional options to get the job done. It’s almost like when cordless tools entered the consumer tool market. You could take the cordless tools anywhere and use them in new and exciting applications. But there was a key drawback that I’m sure you remember. The early cordless tools had a limited effective power range. Over the next decade or two, battery technology improved and there were fewer power related drawbacks to going cordless.

Evolved Programmable Network_SP

A few similarities exist in the network functions virtualization (NFV) space. I Read More »

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An Internet that spurs not strangles innovation

The world we live in today is one where people, process, data and – increasingly – things are connected as never before. The Internet of EveryThing (IoE), is driving the most dynamic area of innovation, creating new business models, economic, social and environmental sustainability and also has fantastic potential to improve our quality of life.

Just imagine: a blind man gaining independence because his once ordinary walking stick is able to communicate with his other senses through sensors, vibrations and GPS technology that guide him through the city maze. Imagine a connected car informed of traffic jams by analyzing traffic patterns and adjusting traffic light operations. Or think of smart manufacturing facilities that cut costs by reducing waste and energy consumption. And these are just the possibilities being realised today. Imagine what the future will look like in 5, 10 or 25 years from now.

We have barely begun to scratch the surface of what’s possible. We don’t know what applications and services will shape the Internet’s future. To continue innovating, we need the Internet to remain open, giving the most creative among us the chance to experiment with daring new ideas.

We also must be sure not to stifle the very innovation that we seek to encourage. If we do so, it could inhibit growth and new ideas alike. This is why today we should focus on putting in place the right policy principles that will further develop this new Internet of Everything.

In policy debates, net neutrality is often understood to mean that all bits should be treated equally, regardless of whether it’s a text, email, picture or video. While at first sight this may sound reasonable, the truth is that such a strict net neutrality principle would become an innovation straight-jacket. It would require us to re-design the Internet as we know it, doing away with tools that have become essential to its success.

Different Internet services have different requirements. It doesn’t really matter if an email arrives now or a second or two later. But if you’re dealing with real-time applications – such as video communication, or buying stocks or monitoring vital signs, delays can have an incredible impact on user experience and effectiveness.

So the truth is that you have to manage internet traffic to make sure that the data that has to get there immediately – does.   This short video explains what traffic management entails and why it is so important.

Reasonable traffic management is so deeply embedded in the Internet’s core structure that it could not operate smoothly without it. This is the case already with the traffic loads of today, let alone in the future. Because management and scheduling are a crucial part of the Internet, we are closely following European efforts to formulate new net neutrality legislation. Cisco believes such legislation has merit but it could also have sweeping implications for reasonable traffic management and new services that would ultimately stifle rather than encourage innovation on the Internet. These implications can and should be avoided.

Fortunately it seems there is an increasing realisation among some policy-makers that net neutrality legislation, necessary as it may be, shouldn’t eliminate reasonable traffic management altogether. That approach would undermine rather than improve the quality of users’ experience. One way to establish net neutrality rules that prevent bad behaviour while maintaining a role for traffic management is to pursue a two-thronged approach where a line is drawn between the types of bad behaviour we do not want to see in the Internet and the necessary and reasonable traffic management techniques that ensure the fast, reliable and scalable networks that we all rely on, and need as consumers.

Equally, there is an emerging consensus that we must avoid overly prescriptive attempts to cast into law lists enumerating or narrowly defining the types of services other than internet access services that we deem “deserving” of specific levels of quality. Such attempts are bound to get it wrong in many cases. Moreover, any such neutrality law would quickly be outpaced and overtaken by reality. Building a Procrustean bed for the Internet is not the way towards a more vibrant digital economy in Europe. It is not necessary to have these prescriptive definitions and conditions on innovation as long as we maintain strong and clear safeguards to ensure an open and reliable Internet.

As the debate on neutrality in Europe enters its final phase, with trialogue negotiations starting this week, we hope the European Parliament will take a fresh look at the issue and we achieve a balanced final outcome.

In essence, the legislation we need should be sturdy enough to hold things together, but flexible enough for Internet entrepreneurs to continue adding new applications and services.

Just think about what the Internet looked like 15 years ago: a handful of wires, noisy connections that would bump you off from time to time, and streaming would be as quick as a snail. We have made huge strides, and we can continue towards an Internet of Everything – a smarter, more productive and efficient way at approaching life. But to get there, striking the right balance in Europe’s regulatory framework is more crucial than ever before.

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Solving the Manufacturing Workforce Crisis of 2030

Sir James Dyson, British inventor, industrial designer and founder of the Dyson Company once said, “Manufacturing is more than just putting parts together. It’s coming up with ideas, testing principles and perfecting the engineering, as well as final assembly.” He’s absolutely right; manufacturing is more than just manual labor on a shop floor somewhere. Today’s manufacturing jobs require a new wave of skilled employees, but where are they?

It amazes me to think about how far manufacturing in the U.S. has come since the days of the industrial revolution and all the way up through the 1950’s. Fast forward to today and you’ll see a manufacturing industry that now relies on advances in technology to drive production and help fuel a global economy. In fact, my colleague Chet Namboodri in his blog ‘Manufacturing Predictions for 2015’ mentions that advancements and adoption of industrial robotics will rapidly advance across all manufacturing segments. However, the longstanding perception of manufacturing has been one of harsh work environments, something that is no longer the case in many manufacturing plants. This outdated perception must be laid to rest and changed amongst a new, younger generation of tech-savvy workers because it’s discouraging qualified candidates from pursuing lucrative careers in manufacturing and directly impacting production in the U.S., a trend that could cause a largely diminished manufacturing workforce by 2030.

The New Manufacturing Environment

Overall, the manufacturing industry is more productive, efficient, and poised for new technological advances made possible by the Internet of Things (IoT). In the 1950s, long, tedious business and production processes created a labor-intensive manufacturing industry. Employees worked in difficult and hazardous environments every day. But as technology advanced, so did manufacturing. A lot of manufacturing jobs are no longer traditional assembly line roles and an industry once driven by manual labor is now moving forward at a much faster pace thanks to machine automation, information technology, and increased plant floor communications. Operators now require advanced knowledge of computers, software, science, and math to program machines that control manufacturing processes.

The manufacturing industry in the U.S. faces a workforce crisis as a widening skills gap is created as many workers reach the age of retirement. If current trends continue, U.S. manufacturers will be unable to fill 2 million manufacturing jobs by 2025, due to a worsening shortage of required skills, according to a report by the Manufacturing Institute and Deloitte. Today, there are really good, well-paying positions that need to be filled across the manufacturing industry. Many students and new graduates fail to consider manufacturing on their quest to find a career path – something that must change. Manufacturers must begin engaging local high schools and trade schools to enhance pipelines of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) trained graduates and developing strategies to attract qualified candidates as they enter the workforce.

Girls For IoT Innovation

Attracting the Next Generation of Manufacturers

The next generation of workers expects to always be connected. They have multiple mobile devices and interact with peers in new ways all the time. This inherent skillset can be a great asset to the manufacturing industry and with the advance of IoT, there will be a strong need for a STEM ready workforce. To generate interest in STEM and perhaps a career in manufacturing, educators must start early. Starting in elementary school, up through high school and college, career relevant math, science and computer instruction should be made available to a wider audience of students across age groups, demographics and geographies.

Not only are more skilled and tech-savvy workers needed put part of the manufacturing skills gap is the result of a lack of women in manufacturing. In fact, women have become an underutilized resource in STEM careers in general – something else that also must change. Pa. Women make up half of the U.S. workforce, but less than a quarter of manufacturing (STEM) jobs are held by women. How can manufacturers attract women to the industry and fill the current skills and gender gaps?

It starts with education. We need to educate young women about what a career in manufacturing is actually about, without continuing the negative perception of work environments. We can do this by supporting STEM education with programs that give kids practical hands-on experience. This is best accomplished when manufacturing industry leaders and organizations reach out to students and new grads, and encourage government leaders to invest in the right kind of training experiences in school curriculum.

IoT World Forum Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge

Cisco is helping to educate young women about STEM careers through the IoT World Forum Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge . The initiative is a global innovation challenge open to young women between the ages of 13-18. The aim of the challenge is to recognize, promote, and reward young innovators as they come up with new uses for Internet of Things technologies and is open now through May 18th, 2015. You can learn more about the IoT World Forum Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge here.

Whether next-generation workers seek a traditional college experience or vocational schooling, students must be exposed to the various options and training opportunities that are available in the manufacturing industry. Organizations should position themselves as go-to resources for prospects looking for jobs in manufacturing. They should offer internships and be able to connect future employees to employers. Hosting workshops, seminars, and conferences are also good forums to make connections.

Through these types of experiences, we can allow students and educational professionals to build passion for the manufacturing industry. In turn, the necessary skillsets will follow. The next-generation techniques and technologies on the plant floor will entice the new age of tech-savvy students. We need solutions now for the workforce of tomorrow and we are the advocates of manufacturing’s next generation workforce. Let me know your ideas in the comments below on how we can all make a difference on this issue.

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