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Policy and Resource Management – The Traffic Police of Video Services

Operators like to provide their subscribers plenty of services. It’s how they win loyalty and differentiate themselves from the competition. They want to offer HD channels and Video on Demand (VOD), they want to optimize delivery by means of Switched Digital Video (SDV) and Adaptive Bitrate (ABR), and of course they want to ensure that all these video services are available on a wide range of devices.

Here’s the problem: each of these services has evolved and rolled out piecemeal over the years. Not only does each service require its own Session and Resource Management (SRM) tool to manage it, but each service is also processed differently per device, thanks to device manufacturers sticking with proprietary protocols. In short, siloed SRMs make scalability unwieldy, driving up Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and sowing Quality of Service chaos when traffic surges hit. Picture a traffic light out at a busy intersection at rush hour with no policeman to direct traffic: Read More »

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Revamping the MSE User Interface

As part of the WLC 8.0 release, we addressed customer comments and revamped the user interface (UI) for the MSE. We wanted to make it easier for customers using both MSE and PI to adjust to larger deployments. We also wanted to quicken the pace at which we could deliver features to the customers. Today I want to walk you through the landing page and configuration of the new MSE UI.

Landing Page

The landing page is the first thing one sees when logging into  the MSE UI. This page provides the user with a basic snapshot of system health, an easy way to launch the apps, and a quick status of the various services on MSE.

System Health

The new UI highlights important parameters like CPU and Memory usage in order to give the user an indication of the stress being handled by the MSE.

 mseui1 Read More »

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What Mobile Cloud Means for Service Providers and Enterprises

In an increasingly digital, mobile and connected world, organizations need new ways to maintain real-time contact with their employees, customers and partners. And mobile cloud will be a major force enabling these ubiquitous connections and reshaping the business landscape. The first post in this series, by Padmasree Warrior, explores how the convergence of mobility and cloud will deliver unprecedented transformation for all organizations. In the second post, Sujai Hajela answers the question, “What exactly is mobile cloud?” In this post, Joe Cozzolino looks at what mobile cloud means for service providers and enterprises.

Be sure to listen to a new Future of Mobility podcast featuring Cisco’s Joe Cozzolino and Sujai Hajela about the power of mobile cloud. Download or listen via iTunes.

The value of mobile cloud is embodied in our 21st century nomadic, hyper-mobile lives. We no longer think in terms of boundaries – between home and office, between laptop, smart phone and an ever-expanding array of devices. We have no patience for latency. Our offices are wherever we are at the moment we need to connect with a colleague or customer, and the device we use is whatever is at hand. Making that happen is no mean feat for mobile service providers.

Imagine having the power of your office in the palm of your hand no matter where you are. Your business applications, your files, directories and chat logs. Everything when you need it, where you need it. It won’t matter what device you’re using or what type of network you’re on. You will move seamlessly from 3G to 4G to WiFi.

Mobile Cloud #4 image

So there you are at the airport, waiting for your flight and you get a call from an important customer. She wants to review the past month’s reports with you, share a file and bring in some colleagues via TelePresence. It has to be now, it has to be secure – and you have to board your plane.

Read More »

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Changing IT Consumption Economics: Ignore at Your Own Peril

As tech buying power shifts away from IT departments to line of business decision makers, five key trends are reshaping how customers want to consume technology.

  1. Customers increasingly want to consume technology, but not build it
  2. They want solutions that address their business problems
  3. They have no interest in complex IT solutions and won’t pay for what they see as complexity
  4. They want to pay as they use the technology and not take on large, up-front expenses
  5. Last – and the big take-away for Cisco partners – they want outcomes, not just technology

In the past, customers bought technology based on a traditional CapEx spending model, where the partner’s role was to sell, install, fix, and refresh the technology. But now customers want something new from their partners – they want partners to help them try, manage, drive adoption of technology, and guarantee a specific business outcome with the implication that there is shared risk and reward. The challenge for partners today is to figure out how to take on new roles as they move from a product focus to an outcomes-based approach. Read More »

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The Agile (r)Evolution – Mobile Heads to the Cloud

Co-Authored by Ian Hood, Senior Manager, Service Provider Architecture & Dan Kurschner, Senior Manager, Service Provider Mobility

Business Challenge:  Everything Goes Mobile

The dynamic state of the business of service providers is quite apparent these days, and perhaps this is most evident for the mobility providers as everyone and everything goes mobile.  All of their consumers, be they individual or business, are clamoring for new capabilities that can automate their business and simplify their lives.  In addition there is a new class (or breed) of consumer – “Things”.  Whether it is the connected car, city, bus, or kitchen appliances, “Things” are increasingly using the mobile network.  Many of these new services and applications are readily available from “Over the Top” (OTT) providers that do not necessarily have any network upon which to deliver them. The OTT business model is designed for service creation agility, leaving it up to the operators to provide network access, quality of experience, and service assurance while managing the exploding demands for bandwidth and spectrum. Read More »

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