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Who Leads the Enterprise Networking and Communication Market?

[Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Matthias Machowinski, Directing Analyst, Enterprise Networks and Video at Infonetics.]

Infonetics recently published our Enterprise Networking and Communication Vendor Leadership Scorecard, our annual look at the top vendors in this space and their strengths and weaknesses. Enterprise networking and communication infrastructure is a critical component of the day-to-day operations of any organization—it connects people, devices, and IT systems and allows them to communicate with each other securely. This market consists of 3 major sub-segments:

  • Networking: Equipment used to build enterprise networks, such as switches, routers, and WLAN
  • Communication: Equipment and software that provides real-time enterprise voice and video communication, such as IP PBX, videoconferencing rooms, and UC software
  • Security: Products that provide security for networks and network-connected devices, such as firewalls, IDS/IPS, and content security appliances Read More »

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SUMMARY – Martin Roesch on Sourcefire Becoming Part of Cisco

Cisco Security has announced the closing of the acquisition of Sourcefire.  Sourcefire founder and CTO (and creator of Snort®) Martin Roesch posted to Sourcefire’s blog this morning to share the news:

“I can tell you with certainty that this is a great match for Sourcefire, for Cisco and, ultimately, for our customers, partners and open source communities” said Roesch.  “From a technology perspective, after having dedicated 15 years to Snort and then to Sourcefire, it’s personally gratifying to be part of building this strong foundation.”

Roesch, now vice president and chief architect of Cisco’s Security Business Group, is excited for the new opportunities presented.  “It’s the new model of security I’ve been talking about for some time.  Now working as part of the Cisco team, led by Chris Young, we can accelerate execution of this vision and make this even more impactful.”

This is just the first exciting news about the acquisition.  As Roesch states in his post, “expect more great things as we continue down this path as ONE team.”

Read the full post: http://blog.sourcefire.com/Post/2013/10/08/1381233600-one-team–sourcefire-is-now-part-of-cisco/

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SUMMARY Chris Young: Cisco Closes Sourcefire Acquisition; Delivers Threat-Centric Security Model

Chris Young, SVP of Cisco’s Security Business Group, posted an official announcement this morning on Cisco’s The Platform blog heralding the close of the Sourcefire acquisition.

 “I am excited to announce that Cisco has completed the acquisition of Sourcefire. With this acquisition, we take a significant and exciting step in our journey to define the future of security. As one company, we offer an unbeatable combination that will greatly accelerate our mission of delivering a new, threat-centric security model”, said Young.

Young also goes in-depth regarding the new capabilities immediately available to current Cisco customers as well as what the acquisition means for Cisco Security roadmap:

  • Leverage current ASA and FirePOWER hardware for future solutions
  • Give Cisco customers immediate access to Sourcefire’s NGIPS, NGFW, and AMP solutions
  • Committing to support open-source projects like Snort, ClamAV, and others
  • Broader solution sets incorporating the newly acquired technologies

This year, Cisco has increased investment in security innovation to provide market-leading threat-focused capabilities.

Young also promised Cisco Security will focus on a “threat-centric” security model moving forward – which means a priority focus on the threats themselves versus policy or controls. “Through our threat-centric model,” he said “we will provide broad coverage across all potential attack vectors, rapidly adjust to and learn from new attack methods, and implement that intelligence back into the infrastructure after each attack.”

Read the full post with all the exciting details here:  http://blogs.cisco.com/news/cisco-closes-sourcefire-acquisition-delivers-threat-centric-security-model

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Emerging Markets Are Upbeat on Cloud

The sweeping changes driven by cloud and the Internet of Everything (IoE) are upending traditional models of IT consumption in dramatic ways.

In order to shed new light on these trends and their impact on IT, Cisco® Consulting Services (CCS), in partnership with Intel®, conducted a wide-ranging study. We explored the powerful changes affecting IT consumption at all stages — how businesses plan, procure, deploy, operate, and govern IT services. We also focused on the ways in which lines of business (LOB) — human resources, sales, and other areas that are end users of IT — are altering overall IT consumption.

Some of our most striking findings related to the differences in perception between developed and emerging markets. The “Impact of Cloud on IT Consumption Models” study surveyed 4,226 IT leaders in 18 industries across nine key economies during March and April 2013. For our purposes, “emerging markets” included Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and Russia,; developed markets were represented by Canada, Germany, United Kingdom, and the United States.

In all markets, cloud is overwhelmingly seen as a good thing. Despite the challenges and added complexity that cloud brings to IT organizations,
a strong majority feels that the business upsides outweigh the negatives. For example, 83 percent of respondents believe that cloud will positively impact IT planning. In addition, 81 percent see a positive impact from cloud on “IT funding and procurement.” Similar percentages apply across all other IT consumption lifecycle stages.

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How the Heck Do You Omnichannel?

The buzz in retail these days is “omnichannel” – we see slogans such as “Engage with Today’s Omnichannel Consumers,” “Develop Your Omnichannel Business” frequently. Cisco itself uses this word often. But in all honesty, I don’t think many people fully grasp the concept and its potential. And I don’t know of any retailer that has a complete approach to it. That’s right: None. 

Omnichannel retailing is about opening the store, its products, and services to shoppers in an immersive way that drives customer interaction across any point of access, at any time. “Omnichannel” is not just about connecting existing systems, it’s a transformational way to look at how you conduct business.

Becoming an omnichannel retailer is a broad undertaking, and many retailers are creating new executive positions to lead this strategy. However, I think these companies may be missing the boat. When thinking about omnichannel strategies, consider three key points:

First, a customer-centric strategy cuts across all organizations in the business – it can’t be sidelined into one business function such as IT. I often consult with retailers who experiment with different capabilities in a disconnected way; essentially, they throw technologies at the wall and wait to see what sticks. Instead, why not start by asking, “What does my customer want? How can I build a loyal relationship with them?” It’s all too easy to assume that showrooming is the enemy. But, really, why, for example, is Amazon successful? It’s not because they are available on a mobile phone. It’s because they are easy to do business with, offer good pricing, and deliver quickly. It’s about the way they address customer needs.

Next, I think stores often try to do too much at once (see wall-sticking, above). Instead, I recommend a phased approach that starts with the low-hanging fruit – projects that have the highest probability of effectiveness and can be measured against business targets as a whole. Every store has its niche, and one size does not fit all. By achieving rapid successes up front, retailers gain funding for the next piece of the strategy, building from success to success.

Finally, accept the fact that an omnichannel business will change how people work. Are you avoiding Internet access because you think associates will waste time surfing the web? Some may – but your good salespeople will be able to leverage online information to help them serve shoppers. Concerned that showrooming on the floor will drive customers away as they find lower prices online? Build your own identity, brand, and incentives into the online environment to drive sales. Worried that an online storefront or call center will undercut in-store sales? Run the numbers on losses over time as consumers find your store is the only one without convenient mobile customer support.

Omnichannel is not about the technology. Rather, it’s about finding the best outcome for you and your shoppers. To achieve success, IT and business must work together to solve customer problems for the store as a whole – there’s no other way to do it with complete success. Check out this great blog by Cara Waters, Five Lessons in Retail Trends.

I love retail trivia! Comment below if you know the answer to this question: What is the oldest US retail company?

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