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May I Borrow a Cup of WiFi?

 

At one time, a knock on the door was from a friend or neighbor looking to borrow some sugar or the hedge trimmer. Today, more often than not, that knock represents someone stopping by for a visit and asking to “borrow” your home network to connect to the Internet.

U.S. consumers carry an average of 2.6 mobile devices, according to recent research by the Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG).  Not only do they expect their devices to connect to the Internet—they also expect friends and neighbors to have home Wi-Fi, just as they have electricity and running water. 

Many service providers are now trying to understand how they can create community Wi-Fi networks among their broadband customers and reap new business benefits.  However, they have very little research on customer behaviors that will enable them to design a winning program and build the business case for further investment.  To learn more, Cisco IBSG conducted a survey of 1,060 Canadian mobile users to understand their needs and behaviors, their current and future mobile usage, and the average profile of community Wi-Fi users. Read More »

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Deploying Business Video: 5 Steps to Success

February 5, 2013 at 8:26 am PST

Have you noticed how the communications and collaboration paradigm has evolved in the last few years? Younger generations use and prefer text messaging (SMS and IM) way more than e-mail. And when given a choice, they will go for a video-enabled, face-to-face interaction, skipping voice-only calls completely. This acceptance of video as a primary vehicle for communication is making a strong presence in the enterprise as a business need. For the emerging workforce, quick, simple video communication is a requirement -- not a nice-to-have capability -- as they intuitively understand how this form of communication is crucial for their productivity and effectiveness.

Like many other technologies and market trends, such as social networking, video is coming to the business environment from the personal consumer environment. Its effect on the way businesses interact internally and externally with customers, partners and providers is completely changing the game and opening new opportunities to create competitive differentiation and broaden reach and impact.

Deploying video without careful planning can easily turn a great idea into a disappointing mess. From our experience in deploying millions of endpoints for thousands of customers around the world, we’ve learned a few things that can help ensure your video deployment is smooth and successful. Here are five tips to achieve success:

1)     Ensure interoperability Read More »

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Unified Fabric: Helping Partners Deliver Innovative Cloud and Data Center Solutions

February 5, 2013 at 7:21 am PST

As the saying goes, “Change is the only constant.” And as partners have seen, customers are constantly grappling with a love-hate relationship between applications and networking. As new applications appear, the infrastructure is required to evolve, which brings about a whole new wave of application innovation that then forces the infrastructure to evolve again and again. This endless cycle has played itself out as applications transitioned from mainframes to client/server to web and now to cloud.

Cisco is extending the capabilities of Unified Fabric to support a world of many clouds with the scalability and flexibility of the new Nexus 6000 series, the traffic insight of Nexus 7000 NAM, Nexus 1000V InterCloud and VNMC InterCloud hybrid cloud solutions and updates to the Cisco ONE portfolio including the new Cisco ONE Controller.

These upgrades will help your customers protect their investments because it can easily be extended to accommodate new applications and usage models as they emerge, allowing customers to shift from “infrastructure defining what apps can do” to “apps defining what infrastructure must do.”

Here are some highlights of the new offerings:  Read More »

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Introducing First Services Module on Nexus 7000 Series

Cloud computing is part of the journey to deliver IT as a Service which enables IT to change from a cost center to a business strategic partner. Forrester Research recently published a report that concluded, “Cloud computing is ready for the enterprise… but many enterprises aren’t ready for the cloud.”1   Yet Cloud deployments are happening – and I mean all types of Clouds – Private, Public and Hybrid. In other words, we have entered the World of Many Clouds.

Network touches everything and is a key building block for agile and scalable virtualized and Cloud-based data centers. Yesterday, I have introduced our new Nexus 6000 series and new 40 GE extensions to Nexus 5500 and 2000 Series. Today, I would like to introduce the very first services module for the Nexus 7000 Series.

  NAM

  Read More »

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VDI “The Missing Questions” #2: Core Speed scaling (Burst)

Welcome back as we continue to dive deeper into advanced CPU (Central Processing Unit -- I had a “tech writer” change a document on me one time, he assumed at this day in age that people still needed to have the CPU acronym translated.. but I digress) and Memory concepts in the land of VDI. Last week Doron answered our first question and told us about Core Count vs. Core Speed for scalable VDI. This week we will focus specifically on Core Speed, bursting and introduce you to a potentially new subject called “SPEC Blend/Core” for high performance VDI. If you are just finding this blog post for the first time, I encourage you to check out the Introduction from Tony as it will help set the stage for our discussion. Here is the full table of contents:

  1. Introduction – VDI – The Questions you didn’t ask (but really should)
  2. VDI “The Missing Questions” #1: Core Count vs. Core Speed
  3. VDI “The Missing Questions” #2: Core Speed Scaling (Burst)  YOU ARE HERE!
  4. VDI “The Missing Questions” #3: Realistic Virtual Desktop Limits
  5. VDI “The Missing Questions” #4: How much SPECint is enough
  6. VDI “The Missing Questions” #5: How does 1vCPU scale compared to 2vCPU’s?
  7. VDI “The Missing Questions” #6: What do you really gain from a 2vCPU virtual desktop?
  8. VDI “The Missing Questions” #7:  How memory bus speed affects scale
  9. VDI “The Missing Questions” #8: How does memory density affect VDI scalability?
  10. VDI “The Missing Questions” #9: How many storage IOPs?

You are Invited!  If you’ve been enjoying our blog series, please join us for a free webinar discussing the VDI Missing Questions, with Tony, Doron, Shawn and Jason!  Access the webinar here!

VM’s are only as fast as their individual cores! Lets look at what this statement means. Example: Assume we have a 1GHz x 4 core processor (hey, it makes math easy for me). When we carve up a server VM or in this case a VM to be used for VDI, we can’t just give it 2 vCPU’s and say it’s got a 2GHz processor. The reality is that it has a dual 1GHz processor. This becomes an important concept in VDI when you are considering the quantity and QUALITY of vCPU’s you allocate to a Virtual Machine and ultimately the end user applications efficiency and the overall scalability of the server platform. This is not a Uni-processor vs. Multi-processor application discussion. We could easily have a very long discussion and debate on the in’s and out’s of application level efficiencies and the Operating Systems ability (and sometimes inability) to properly manage multiple CPU’s. We are going to expand upon the two CPU’s we tested and dig into per core performance.

CPU Burst vs. CPU Reservation. Let’s play around with our example 1GHz x 4 Core Processor a bit more. If we take this single processor and deploy 8 single vCPU desktops on it we will have a 500MHz CPU reservation per VM. The calculation for that is simple 1GHz x 4 Cores = 4,000MHz / 8 total VM’s = 500MHz/VM Reservation. So the Reservation is simply the average amount of CPU that is available to each VM (assuming everything is prioritized equally). But our Burst is different. Our Burst represents the maximum amount of CPU Core that any one VM could ever utilize. In this example, the Burst per VM is equivalent to 1GHz.

Read More »

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