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Summary : Sourcefire in our Data Center by Cisco Chief Security Officer

December 6, 2013 at 7:00 am PST

 

Sourcefire

 

 

 

 

 

Last October , Cisco confirmed that Sourcefire was now part of our family of security products and solutions .

“With this acquisition, we take a significant and exciting step in our journey to define the future of security. As one company, we offer an unbeatable combination that will greatly accelerate our mission of delivering a new, threat-centric security model. Through the addition of Sourcefire’s competitive talent and technologies, I see vast opportunities to expand Cisco’s global security footprint in both new and emerging markets, broaden our solution sets and deepen our customer relationships “

Chris Young, Cisco Senior Vice President Security Group
in his blog “Delivers Threat-Centric Security Model “

“Beyond the technology, one of the things that is important to me is that Cisco and Sourcefire both share key values that transcend our company names, HQ locations and number of employees. Much like Sourcefire’s Firemen Principles, you can be confident that these values will continue as one team at Cisco.”

Martin Roesch, Sourcefire founder and CTO and now VP and Chief Architect of Cisco Security Group
in his blog ONE Team 

These days , John Stewart , Senior Vice President, Cisco Chief Security Officer , announced that we completed the  deployment of Sourcefire at Cisco . John Stewart oversees at Cisco the Threat Response, Intelligence and Development ( TRIAD ) organization .

The implementation is already giving us insights into our data center that we never had before

To know  more about this deployment and John’s first impressions check his blog
 The First Inline Production Deployment at Cisco 

 

The Cisco security architecture helps data center networking teams take advantage of security capabilities built into the underlying data center fabric, to accelerate safe data center innovation. There are three important security measures that every IT organization should follow to securely support data center innovation. 
To learn more, download the Cisco white paper “Three Must-Have Security Measures that Accelerate Data Center Innovation.”

Tell us what do you think of the acquisition of Sourcefire by Cisco .

 

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Security Drives Major Transition in the Network and Data Center

Today, rapid changes in the world we live in, driven by technology trends, business model changes and market transitions, like the Internet of Everything, profoundly impact our networks and our data centers. With the advent of all of these new capabilities, we have created a new paradigm for security—it is what I refer to as the “Any to Any” Problem. That is, any user on any device increasingly going over any type of connection, to any application, that could be running in any data center and on any cloud. Regardless of how or where our users are connecting, we have to provide the right levels of inspection and protection against malicious actors.

Today, Cisco is announcing the new Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) designed to seamlessly integrate layer 4 through layer 7—and security, in particular—into next generation Data Center environments. As part of this framework, we are announcing ACI Security Solutions, which support next generation Cisco ASA physical and virtual firewall technologies by stitching them directly into the ACI network fabric, and can be managed using the ACI Policy Infrastructure Controller management tool.

The Cisco ASA 5585-X Series Next-Generation Security Appliance has been updated and certified to interoperate with the new Nexus 9000 switches—whether they are deployed in traditional or ACI modes. The new Cisco ASA Virtual Firewall (ASAv) performs the same functions as any ASA appliance. However, unlike an ASA 1000v Cloud Firewall, the ASAv maintains its own data path. This allows it to work with any virtual switch and it will be available on multiple hypervisors.  Read More »

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SUMMARY Chris Young: Cisco Closes Sourcefire Acquisition; Delivers Threat-Centric Security Model

October 8, 2013 at 5:38 am PST

Chris Young, SVP of Cisco’s Security Business Group, posted an official announcement this morning on Cisco’s The Platform blog heralding the close of the Sourcefire acquisition.

 “I am excited to announce that Cisco has completed the acquisition of Sourcefire. With this acquisition, we take a significant and exciting step in our journey to define the future of security. As one company, we offer an unbeatable combination that will greatly accelerate our mission of delivering a new, threat-centric security model”, said Young.

Young also goes in-depth regarding the new capabilities immediately available to current Cisco customers as well as what the acquisition means for Cisco Security roadmap:

  • Leverage current ASA and FirePOWER hardware for future solutions
  • Give Cisco customers immediate access to Sourcefire’s NGIPS, NGFW, and AMP solutions
  • Committing to support open-source projects like Snort, ClamAV, and others
  • Broader solution sets incorporating the newly acquired technologies

This year, Cisco has increased investment in security innovation to provide market-leading threat-focused capabilities.

Young also promised Cisco Security will focus on a “threat-centric” security model moving forward – which means a priority focus on the threats themselves versus policy or controls. “Through our threat-centric model,” he said “we will provide broad coverage across all potential attack vectors, rapidly adjust to and learn from new attack methods, and implement that intelligence back into the infrastructure after each attack.”

Read the full post with all the exciting details here:  http://blogs.cisco.com/news/cisco-closes-sourcefire-acquisition-delivers-threat-centric-security-model

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RSA 2013: That’s a Wrap

RSA 2013 ends and I both miss it and breathe a sigh of relief that it’s over. Let me explain. As a security guy, it’s nice to be around other security like-minded people.  We all speak the language. You needn’t really justify why you are worried about things most people have never heard of. It’s exciting to see so many people try so many different things, be it startups, big companies, or inspired individuals. It’s great to see government employees, corporate executives, and pony-tailed security geeks all talking to one another.  In a slightly strange way, it’s therapeutic.

That said, RSA is an incredibly intense week, and this year’s conference was no exception. In four-and-a-half full days (and this is just my schedule), I had:

  • Eight customer meetings
  • Eight dinners (working out to 1.78 dinners per day.)
  • Four press interviews: two on-record, one background, 1 live videocast via Google+
  • Four bizdev/company review meetings
  • Two panels
  • Two  analyst interviews
  • Two partner meetings
  • One customer breakfast talk along with with Chris Young

And this doesn’t include the countless run-ins with friends, a quick word here or there, and emails that all have to be managed along the way. In some respects, you don’t get enough time with really good friends (if there really is such a thing as enough time for such people in our lives), and in the end, it’s a huge blur from meeting to meeting.

I posed a question in my blog earlier this year: Are we making progress in cyber security? I say yes, yet not nearly enough, and now I am thinking hard about how to change it before RSA 2014.

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Defense in Depth with Software Defined Networking

Last week at the RSA Conference in San Francisco, I had the pleasure of speaking to thousands of security professionals about the opportunities and risks associated with using Software Defined Networking (SDN) for security, which will be the underlying fabric of our next generation data centers and networks. SDN-enabled security will provide a better way to secure our most valuable applications, users and data, now and in the future.

Each vendor has a different definition of how the network is changing, and there are many different terms being used, such as software defined data center and software defined storage. Cisco calls this Application Centric Networking, for example, because we are introducing programmable APIs with a focus on distributed control plane intelligence so that applications can get value directly from the network.

It’s obvious why the networking industry is embracing SDN: lower operational costs and the ability to deploy applications and network services in a quicker, more scalable manner. Cloud bursting, which is about flexible compute in the cloud, is another SDN benefit that gives us the ability for applications to interact directly with the network in ways that do not happen today.  For example, applications will be able to query the network for location of users to manage Quality of Service and deliver highly targeted content.

So why should the security industry care about SDN? As the threat landscape evolves, the opportunity is to make Security a key application for SDN. We can use SDN to build a Network-based Threat Defense System. I see three key elements to this system:

Read More »

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