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California Schools Utilizes Cisco Access Points and Switches for Better Learning

It’s no secret that public schools have needs that often go unfunded. So when a school district gets the opportunity to earmark funds for technology enhancements, they need to make sure they get the best.



After years of school budgets cuts, the Manteca Unified School District (MUSD) received a one-time gift from the state legislature to reinvest funds back in their schools. The district made the decision to create a “Going Digital” initiative. This initiative was created to completely overhaul the district’s entire network infrastructure.  This infrastructure overhaul wasn’t child’s play as MUSD serves more than 32,500 students spread out over 32 campuses in California’s Central Valley. The district was given a time limit to complete the project—it had to be finished in nine months.

Using Cisco products such as Cisco Aironet 3700 Series Access Points, Cisco Catalyst 6500 and 2960-X Series switches, the school district completely updated their network. Thanks to devices supporting 802.11ac next-generation wireless standards, students are able to take advantage of their new wireless network. This means students can compete against classmates in digital quiz games or learn how to use a 3D printer. But this technology doesn’t just make the lives of students easier. By using management solution data, the district can locate lost devices, view usage statistics and learn about individual user’s connections from a central location. It can also quickly fix problem areas by giving the MUSD IT staff the ability to spot issues and fix them quickly.  The network is scalable so that new technologies—such as a physical security system—can be added in the future.

To learn more about this case study, point your browser here.


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Scaling the Internet with 6500 Switches Ternary Content Addressable Memory(TCAM) Customization

The Internet routing table size has continued to grow steadily. In 2008 we reached 256K routes and now the table has exceed 512K Routes. This is of significance for customers running some of the older PFC3 based Supervisor 720 engines on the 6500 and 7600 switches.

On the Catalyst 6500 and 7600 Series platforms, all of the routing information is stored in special high-speed memory called TCAM. Read More »

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Global Internet Routing Table Reaches 512k Milestone

omar-santosWritten by Omar Santos, Incident Manager, Cisco Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) Security Research and Operations

Since the early 1990s, we’ve watched as the number of entries on the Internet routing table has steadily grown. In 2008 the table reached 256,000 routes, triggering action by network administrators to ensure the continued growth of the Internet. Today we know that another significant milestone has been reached, as we officially passed the 512,000 or 512k route mark!

Our industry has known this milestone was approaching for some time. In fact it was as recently as May 2014 that we provided our customers with a reminder of the milestone, the implications for some Cisco products, and advice on appropriate workarounds.

If you would like to revisit that information, you can find the customer support article here: The Size of the Internet Global Routing Table and Its Potential Side Effects (12 May 2014)

Full text of the customer support article below: Read More »

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How I became a Networking Enthusiast

I’ve always been curious about networks. I remember opening up an old Linksys Router and discovering the physical circuit, the processor and integrated memory.

But my official networking life didn’t start until my coworker taught me the basics of routing. The first thing I learned was how to log in and enter commands within the command line. The second was CRC errors. These small lessons peaked my interest and by the following week I was digging in and researching how the devices worked. The first Cisco device I had the pleasure to meet was a Catalyst 6500.Cisco Catalyst 6500

I had no idea what I was doing, but I was eager to learn. Software verses firmware, “.bin”’ extensions, encapsulation, connections from LAN to WAN, wiring. The more I researched, the more I liked it and realized this was what I really wanted to do. Read More »

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Cisco Instant Access: What Is It?

What is Cisco Instant Access?

Cisco Instant Access is a concept that was launched at Cisco Live Orlando last year. For those of you familiar with the Nexus product line, think Fabric Extender (FEX). The first customers are starting to implement this concept now. The whole point of Instant Access is explained with the picture below.

Cisco Instant Access1

To the left is the traditional network with multiple access switches located in closets, uplinked to the distribution layer or straight to the core in a collapsed core design. Every access switch is a point of management which needs configuration, software maintenance and feature compatibility with other access switches. Read More »

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