Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Security

Bring Your Own Margarita (I Mean Device) – Architectures, Design, and Operation

November 1, 2012 at 10:51 am PST

Mobility allows the expansion of Information Technology (IT) resources and application availability at anytime, anywhere, and in any possible way. Historically, many thought that “the movement” of bring your own device (BYOD) was simply a marketing tactic. However, BYOD is definitely a reality that has become crucial when trying to improve efficiency in the workplace.

Every single day a new mobile gadget is released to the market (for example, tablets, mobile phones, and many other mobile systems) and we all live in a connected world 24 hours a day 7 days a week. All these devices and social applications are introducing many security risks for enterprises and public sector organizations. These risks include threats of data theft, not only with very sophisticated attacks, but also with incidents as simple as just stealing mobile devices. Many of these devices can contain private and corporate information.

The question now is, how can we provide the benefits of  improving user productivity and flexibility without compromising network security? The Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility client and the Cisco ASA 5500 Adaptive Security Appliances allow users to connect to their corporate network from any device based on comprehensive secure access policies. The Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client can work in conjunction with the Cisco IronPort Web security appliances and provides integration with ScanSafe.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Collaborating with the New Generation

October 31, 2012 at 3:41 pm PST

I had a troubling thought. If I can no longer be considered part of the new generation, am I now the old generation? Generation X used to sound so modern, but we’re no longer the cool kids. After all, I’m driving a Prius and doing fourth-grade homework with my kid after dinner instead of chasing Skrillex. Now we have the Millennials who, according to Wikipedia, are Gen Y. (But, really, what generation wants to be saddled with a name based on the one that came before it?)

We recently invited a small group of MBA students from University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business to meet some of our customers for a grilling panel on what companies can expect from the new generation entering the workforce.

They provided first-hand perspective about what it’s like to be new on the block and work with, well, er, an older generation. Compared to our learned comfort with technology, theirs is nearly ingrained based on its presence in their lives since childhood. This difference comes through in their expectations, habits, and predictions for the wonderful world of technology in front of us. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

iPad Mini Launches – How will it and others impact education?

October 26, 2012 at 9:27 am PST

As we look seriously at connected learning, the influx of notebooks and mobile learning applications has been astounding. This week, in fact, Apple took over much of the news with the launch of its iPad Mini. In the previous weeks leading up to this launch, I heard and read discussions around education being a key target audience for this new iPad offering, which renewed my intrigue in the use of handheld devices & mobile learning.

Bloomberg discussed the rise in iPads being used in the classrooms due to its “cool factor” and ability to encourage students to learn by increasing engagement. More than 2,500 classrooms currently utilize iPads as learning tools, and this number is expected to increase with the continued growth of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD). Superintendent of the McAllen Independent School District in Texas was quoted saying, “We’re moving away from desktops and laptops. Ninety percent of the work is now being done on mobile devices.”

Think about that for a minute -- ninety percent -- wow. With mobile learning amongst Forbes recent list of Five Technologies to Watch, it is obviously only going to increase in momentum. In addition, the potential revolution in digital textbooks is primed to change the entire landscape. The jury is still out on when that revolution will take place, but it’s looking more and more like a reality.

Are you, or do you know, an educator who is formatting educational materials for mobile devices and planning learning activities that leverage multimedia, videoconferencing and other features of smart phones and tablets? Tell us your story! (and what you think of the new iPad mini)

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Perspectives on MobileCon 2012

I attended MobileCon 2012, the newly branded CTIA enterprise and application event, earlier this month. I noticed the common theme this year was MDM-BYOD-Cybersecurity. Given the recent McKinsey report that indicated 77 percent of CIOs today state that they will allow some form of consumerization in the coming few years, IT professionals are challenged to increase flexibility without compromising security

Throughout the event, I heard many BYOD case studies with a huge interest/following in data and metrics. On this theme, I thought our own Cisco BYOD case study that we have been sharing with our customers would be of interest to this community.

Note, I will provide updated numbers soon as my peers continue to seek out the latest and greatest mobile devices here in the center of Silicon Valley.

For Cybersecurity, I’d like to follow up on John Stewart’s thoughts from yesterday. October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, and the joint-task theme between public and private industries resonated across the show. On this note, Cisco is one of the contributors in CTIA’s recently released Cybersecurity Whitepaper.

In my next few blogs, I want to share interesting facts I’m calling, “Did U Know Data for Mobile Security.” The first fact comes from Osterman Research, Inc. for Azaleos.

“The leading factor (34%) cited for deploying an MDM solution was the potential for loss of intellectual property.”

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Talk Security When You Talk BYOD

October 24, 2012 at 7:30 am PST

The verdict is in — and it is all about security. Recent research from The Economist notes that security is the top concern for mobility and BYOD. Organizations want to embrace BYOD but want control to ensure secure access to the network. Chuck Robbins, Cisco Senior Vice President, wrote a blog entry that underscores what we hear almost daily in conversations with our customers and partners. The organizations we speak to have mobility policies that range from no personal devices allowed at all (which is really not BYOD), to policies that permit all personal devices with restricted access, and still others that allow all devices with differentiated access based on the device type, user, and posture.

Some common differentiation access use cases may include:

  • Allow my sales force to access the proposal portal remotely from their iPads but do not allow them access to the finance database.
  • Do not allow any jail broken device, whether personal or corporate-owned, because there is a high probability it has been infected with malware. A device is considered jail broken when the user gains root access to the operating system, allowing applications or extensions to be downloaded that are not available in the Apple Application store, which increases the risk of malware infection.
  • Automatically check to see if the device has pin-lock and disk encryption (basic device security), grant the device the appropriate access. If not, it will be diverted with the non-compliance explanation.

Another interesting observation is many of our higher education customers are starting to see eight devices per user versus the three devices noted. Watch out! The next workforce has some real potential to influence the new workplace.

To help organizations get ready for securing BYOD, we have a paper on Readiness Assessments: Vital to Secure Mobility; check it out.

Stay tuned -- later this year we look forward to sharing with you some further insight on mobile workers and their perceptions and behaviors regarding security. For example, how many folks download sensitive data on their personal smartphone? Or when an alert or pop-up warning occurs on their personal device what do they do? How many engage in risky behavior? Who is security aware? If you are a mobile device worker it would be great to hear your understanding of the security of your personal device in the new workplace.

Tags: , , , ,