Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Collaboration

Got Mobility? Check. Now What?

November 4, 2013 at 9:16 am PST

The mobility discussion isn’t fresh off the presses. BYOD isn’t something you have to look up to remember what the D represents. But much of the business-mobility discussion still focuses around smartphones and basic access. It’s a pretty limited view when you consider the potential beyond the petri dish of e-mail and calendaring.

mochachip

Take me to your keyboard…

Having access to my work e-mail and calendar on my smartphone is good stuff. As is having my choice of phones. And even the simple tools benefit my productivity, while letting me have a life beyond my job. Surprise, surprise: Sometimes “work happens” outside the normal work hours of my particular time zone. And, yes, “life happens” during my normal work hours.

I could be productive on a laptop from home, but my dog would soon gnaw through my keyboard in protest. (Hastened by prodding from my kid and a jar of peanut butter.) But she doesn’t mind if I check and answer e-mail at the dog park.

She’s a pretty advanced dog. She even accepts the need for instant messaging and an occasional WebEx conference, although her presence typically requires liberal use of the mute button.

Beyond the Basics
So, what’s missing? Once people get over the novelty of e-mail and calendaring, they look for more. If they can slingshot birds across the universe, book airline flights, and deposit checks on these pocket-sized supercomputers, shouldn’t they be able to do more?

Read More »

Tags: , , , ,

Education Embraces the Mobility Excitement

November 4, 2013 at 6:00 am PST

Let’s examine and consider mobile devices in education. Students need to become more tech savvy to compete in today’s economy, and mobile devices offer supplemental learning and a new style to learn. A recent report noted that educators see great potential in mobile technology for transforming learning. The most commonly expected and desired benefits are that mobile technology is engaging for students (62 percent of respondents) and that the devices can be used to personalize instruction to meet the needs of different students. There is no question educational institutions need to seize this mobility trend for better learning and to ensure our next generation is tech savvy.

Does your child’s school provide mobile devices for their learning or does it require your child to bring their own mobile device? I know in my case, my son’s school has a bring your own device (BYOD) policy. Yet some schools, whether higher education or primary or secondary schools, have made the decision to buy mobile devices for their student population. According to the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Unified School District, the second largest district in the United States, headed down this path to offer all students and teachers Apple iPads — only to find some challenges like unseen costs, secure access issues, and unclear policies. Others, like Bucks County School District in Pennsylvania and McAllen School District in Texas, have enjoyed the benefits of providing mobile device usage (whether BYOD or school sanctioned) in a simple and secure manner in the education environment by leveraging Cisco infrastructure.

The use of mobile devices by young children, whether it be for education or entertainment, has soared. A new report from Common Sense Media, a child-advocacy group based in San Francisco, found that 17 percent of children 8 and younger use mobile devices daily, up from 8 percent in 2011. I am guessing that education and entertainment will continue to drive this number each year. What is your opinion on schools using mobile devices? Is this the shiny new penny to improve our education systems? And as an IT professional, what is your experience with the mobility and secure access considerations?

Tags: , ,

NCSAM 2013 Wrap-Up: Cisco Thought Leadership Regarding a Different Ghost in the Machine

Is it the end of October already? As has been true for centuries, there is a tradition for children to wear costumes and disguise themselves while going door to door with a simple question: “Trick or treat?” While I am not sure there is a coincidence, but having National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) end on a day characterized by pranks, false identifications and the like seems appropriate. And what scary stories we had to tell!

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Honesty is the Best BYOD Policy

Does BYOD really mean that my device will become the company’s device? Do I control my private data or does my employer? How can I make sure I maintain a work-life balance when my personal device is also my work device? Will my company support any device I choose?

Some of these questions might seem familiar as more business employees consider adding their own device to their company’s network. These questions also represent an important part of a comprehensive mobile strategy: User buy-in.

Brett Belding BYOD - without headerRecently, I read an interesting CIO article by Adam Bender that highlighted the importance of getting employees on board when implementing a BYOD policy. The article discusses that according to Frost & Sullivan analyst, Audrey William, many employees are worried that they won’t be able to control data on their device once they begin using it for work. In addition, William states that employees are also concerned about the lines blurring between work and play when both personas are merged onto one single device.

Although the concept of BYOD is not new, these concerns have important consequences in our networked world. So, what’s the answer?

An honest, safe, and secure MDM solution and effective policy communication. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mobile Devices Will Transform Your Business IT

There’s no question that more people around the world are connecting to wireless networks at home, work and play via mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. This rise in mobile device usage begs the question: How soon will it be (if not already) before these mobile devices dominate the mobile network, especially in the workplace?

Chris Spain - with header FINALJust recently, I read an article in Forbes, by Louis Columbus, that addresses the issue of increased mobile devices and unprepared network infrastructures. The article examines a study by IDC that predicts that 87% of sales for connected devices will be tablets and smartphones in next four years. As many employees prefer working from their own mobile devices, corporate networks, as they’re currently designed, will not be capable of successfully managing such a large volume of mobile data traffic generated by these mobile devices. With such expansive growth expected, the majority of businesses will either need to adapt an existing strategy to support this increase in mobile devices or adopt a new strategy.

Currently, there is a clear need for enterprises to better prepare and invest in their IT infrastructure. As more employees use their own devices at work for business and personal use, it’s imperative that business organizations require a secure mobile device and BYOD strategy to accommodate their business needs and employee preferences. However, the decision to adopt BYOD comes with a set of challenges for IT organizations.

Many of the benefits of BYOD, such as having the choice of device and anywhere, anytime access, are somewhat adverse to traditional IT requirements for security and support. In the past, IT pre-determined a list of approved workplace devices, typically a prescribed desktop, laptop, and perhaps even a small, standardized set of mobile phones and smartphones. Employees could choose among these devices, but generally were not permitted to stray from the approved devices list. With BYOD, IT has to approach the problem differently. Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,