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Secure BYOD for Midsize Businesses

The Internet of Everything will connect 50 billion things by 2020.

Your midsize business needs to stay ahead of potential security risks.

Are you ready?

Previously, I wrote about the importance of driving success for midsize businesses. Today I am focusing on security and BYOD for midsize companies.

Are you fully aware of all of the people and devices on your network? Has your business begun implementing BYOD? Read More »

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Cisco Expands the Reach and Power of Unified Access to Drive Business Innovation

Over the last 15 months Cisco has revolutionized how organizations provide reliable, secure access to end-users and devices that connect via wireless, wired or VPN networks. This new approach to unified access delivers significant operational improvements by delivering One Policy, One Management, and One Network. However, operational improvements are only half of the story. As a key solution within the Cisco ONE Enterprises Network Architecture, Cisco Unified Access allows IT to shift from merely managing the network to driving business change by delivering new connected experiences.

Business Innovation Starts with Mobility

IT is looking beyond just securely onboarding mobile devices to now scaling the access across devices. The goal is to provide the best possible user experience for rich media applications while managing the applications and content on these devices.  Mobile device use continues to grow and the bandwidth required by the applications on those devices is likewise increasing. Higher mobile density, and the need for an infrastructure that can handle it,  is becoming a necessity: Read More »

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TMA? Get Some Relief from Acronym Overload

I see and hear a variety of acronyms being used on a daily basis. I recently heard one tossed around with good humor that makes a point: TMA or Too Many Acronyms. Every once in a while, when I think I’ve embedded the definition and use of an acronym into my long-term memory (anything beyond an extended weekend), it seems as if either a new acronym was spawned, or it has been overloaded with a different meaning. My goal in this blog post is offer both a refresher on some topical acronyms that appear to be quite commonly circulated in security technology circles and media outlets. It is challenging to be a subject matter expert in every aspect of cyber security. Whether you are reading an article, joining a conversation or preparing for a presentation or certification in the realm of cyber security, you may not be completely perplexed by these acronyms when you come across them and become more familiar with them. For situational purposes, I organized the acronyms into categories where I have seen them used frequently and included related links for each of them.

Network Infrastructure

AAAAuthentication, Authorization, and Accounting. This is a set of actions that enable you to control over who is allowed access to the network, what services they are allowed to use once they have access, and track the services and network resources being accessed.

ACL/tACL/iACL/VACL/PACLAccess Control List. ACLs are used to filter traffic based upon a set of rules that you define. For ACLs listed with a prefix (for example, t=transit, i=infrastructure, V=VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network), P=Port)), these ACLs have special purposes to address a particular need within the network.

FW/NGFW/FWSM/ASASM: Firewall/Next Generation Firewall/Firewall Service Module/Adaptive Security Appliance Services Module. These products provide a set of security features designed to govern the communications via the network. Cisco provides firewall features as a dedicated appliance or hardware module that can be added to a network device such as a router.

IPS: Intrusion Prevention System. Typically, this is a network appliance that is used to examine network traffic for the purposes of protecting against targeted attacks, malware, and application and operating system vulnerabilities. In order to ensure the effectiveness of a Cisco IPS device, it  should be maintained using Cisco’s IPS subscription service.

DNSSECDomain Name System (DNS) Security Extensions. That’s right, we have an acronym within an acronym. These are the specifications for security characteristics that make it possible to verify the authenticity of information stored in DNS. This validation makes it possible to provide assurances to resolvers that when they request a particular piece of information from the DNS, that they receive the correct information published by the authoritative source. Read More »

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BYOD, Mobility, and Remote Access VPN – How Can I Troubleshoot All These Technologies and Solutions?

June 8, 2012 at 7:22 am PST

Mobility enables the extension of IT resources and application availability to anytime, anyplace, any way. Initially people thought that the “mobility movement” was just hype; however, it is definitely a reality, as it has become ubiquitous with efficiency. All of these new devices and social applications are bringing potential security risks to the enterprise and public sector organizations. The threat landscape ranges from potential data leakage to lost and stolen devices that may contain corporate and private information.

The question now is how can we address the customers’ challenge of enhancing productivity without compromising network security. Cisco’s AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client and the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances enable desktop and mobile users to connect to the corporate network, giving access to the network from any device based on comprehensive secure access policies. Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client works in conjunction with Cisco’s IronPort Web security appliance, the Cisco ASA appliance, and also provides integration with ScanSafe, an in-the-cloud Web security solution.

Read More »

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Should IT Fear Mother’s Day?

May 15, 2012 at 6:30 am PST

This past weekend was Mother’s Day here in the United States, and being a mother of two high-tech savvy teenage children, I pondered what my kids has in store for me. I was surprised with the latest iPad! Eventually, I started asking myself: would Cisco allow me to use it for work?

Luckily, Cisco has a BYOD policy in place and a long-term vision for an Any Device, empowering our employees to use the device they want to be productive. For other working mothers who may have also gotten a new iPad or mobile device for Mother’s Day, what does  your company say about using this new personal device? Will you “Lock It Up or Free It Up”? (a notion introduce at RSA conference this year). How will IT department respond to this request?

One of the biggest concerns folks have for BYOD is security. Just this past week, Cisco was showcasing our Secure BYOD solution at Interop, with the TechWiseTV folks sitting down with my colleague Bill McGee to help you answer the call of mobile devices on your corporate network. Take a look at the video for yourself, but blurring the lines between personal and corporate device doesn’t pose such a security challenge anymore. Related to this topic, we are holding a webcast May 16th focused on the Network Built for the Mobile Experience. You can join our CTO and SVP, Padmasree Warrior, along with stories from British Telecom and Eagle Investment on how they are transforming their workplace, and allowing their employees to work “Your Way” without compromising the business. For more details click here, and for those who want to continue this conversation--

Working Mothers: I would like to hear from you -- did you get that new mobile device this Mother’s Day or do you already have a neat personal device -- Do you bring it into work? Do you share it with your family?

IT departments: What is your BYOD policy is, and are you busy provisioning all those new mobile devices from this past weekend?

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