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If You Freelance, Here’s How to Collaborate Efficiently

Freelancing can be a great way to work. You don’t have to live by corporate edicts, you have the freedom to choose your work (well, at least you like to pretend you do – any freelancer knows you rarely turn down an assignment!) and you can work when and where you like.

Of course, there are challenges: getting work, keeping clients and figuring out how to collaborate in an efficient way. As any freelancer knows, time is money and driving to see clients can burn a good chunk of a day that could otherwise be used to get the work done!

Lorie Vela at makes this observation:

Being a freelancer is already hard enough made even harder by adding new tasks and complicated operations when it comes to contacting, interacting and communicating with others. But the truth is that freelancers know better than anyone else what collaboration is all about, because being a freelancer means having to co-work with others, whether they are clients, customers, providers, etc, you always need to send files, emails, manage contacts, share, . Obviously, there’s a need to count on reliable tools and resources to work, but how about the planning and strategy to make it easier?

I’m surprised by how many freelancers collaborate in a very intuitive way, without even noticing they are doing so, they simply call it work. But knowing that you are “collaborating” could probably help you understand why sometimes things go wrong, why communication fails, why organizing tasks seems sometimes like an impossible issue to get resolved in time.

We want to help you collaborate effectively.

Using online meetings can save you tons of time. You don’t have to travel and you can meet with anyone who has a computer or internet device (think phone, iPad, etc.).You can use your webcam to make the meeting personal and share drafts, thumbnails, and more because online meetings let you show whatever is on your computer to your participants. And they can share too.

Maybe the best thing for freelancers is Read More »

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The Results: How Reverse Mentoring Can Enhance Diversity and Inclusion

Back in April this year I wrote a blog about a programme we drove in Europe last fiscal year called Reverse Mentoring, where a senior employee is also mentored by the junior employee. All of our 31 mentors and 31 mentees have now reached the end of the programme and I’d like to share with you their feedback – what they enjoyed, what worked well and what we can improve upon in the future. Read More »

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Don’t Kill Employee Motivation: Blanchard Team Presents Delivering Feedback that Gets Results

Providing good feedback does not occur naturally or by default. To provide effective feedback, leaders must learn, develop, and cultivate fundamental skills. Organizations that do not address these fundamental skills risk creating an environment where people fail to observe, reflect and self-correct their behavior.

Register for this free WebEx event now.

In 1998, Fast Company wrote an article on employee feedback and over ten years ago managers faced the same problems:

Too many leaders still treat feedback as a once-a-year event, rather than an ongoing discipline. “Doing annual appraisals is like dieting only on your birthday and wondering why you’re not losing weight,” cracks Saunier. Too many leaders confuse feedback with paperwork. “Filling out a form is inspection, not feedback,” says Kelly Allan, senior associate of Kelly Allan Associates Ltd., a consulting firm based in Columbus, Ohio whose clients have included Boeing, Paramount Pictures, and IBM. “History has taught us that relying on inspections is costly, improves nothing for very long, and makes the organization less competitive.”

Why is giving feedback so difficult? Read More »

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The QWERTY Complex: Un-jamming our organizations to thrive through change

Today, we are featuring a guest post from Sara Roberts, President and CEO of Roberts Golden Consulting, Inc. She is known for her expertise in large-scale transformation, particularly in driving culture change for enterprise innovation and collaboration, and has provided strategic guidance to dozens of the world’s top global companies over the past 15 years.

Navigating in today’s workplace can be disorienting.  It seems that the minute we reorganize, restructure, merge, shift… we need to do it yet again to keep up with new demands.  We lament, when are things ever going to be normal again? Things are changing so fast.  We can’t possibly keep up!

In our organizations, we often point to ‘agility’ as critical to our success – yet the ironic part is that our organizations are still trying to command and control our way into being more nimble.

What exactly is going on?  For starters, witness the last twenty years.  There’s been an explosion of vastly more information, globalization resulting in larger and farther-flung teams and, not to mention, greater competition coming from unexpected and untraditional sources.  Think: NetFlix and how Blockbuster didn’t see it coming. There has been a serious tectonic shift and our companies are at the epicenter.

In our organizations, we often point to ‘agility’ as critical to our success – yet the ironic part is that our organizations are still trying to command and control our way into being more nimble.  Often times we don’t fully realize that these old hierarchical structures, we’re holding steadfastly to, are unable to process information quickly enough to make the necessary day-to-day business decisions.  We think we can simply optimize to do it better, faster and cheaper but in reality, we need a transformation in our workplaces.

As I was writing this last paragraph, it made me think of a cognitive behavioral theory I recently read about, called “path dependence.”  This term refers to the notion that “something that seems normal or inevitable today began with a choice that made sense at a particular time in the past, but survived despite the eclipse of the justification for that choice.”  For instance, typewriters used to jam if people typed too fast, so the manufacturers designed a keyboard that would slow typists. We no longer have typewriters, but we are stuck with the letter arrangements of the qwerty keyboard.

Let’s ask ourselves: do we really want to be stuck with qwerty organizations?

Read More »

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Essential Recession Recovery Tips for your Business from Ken Blanchard: Free WebEx Event

On April 20, Ken Blanchard, founder of the Ken Blanchard Companies will host a free WebEx called, “Healing the Wounded Organization,” aimed at helping companies recover from the last few years of cut-backs, realignments and more.

Reserve your spot today.

If your organization is like most, you’ve been through a lot the last two years. Layoffs mean friends were let go, teams reshaped, and everyone is doing more with less. Your organization has weathered the storm, but not without its share of cuts and bruises—especially to the human side of the organization.

A successful business is about more than operations.

During this WebEx, best-selling business author Ken Blanchard shares three key strategies Read More »

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