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All 802.11ac Vendors are the same…Right?

If you are an Enterprise IT Manager, this is a question that you must ask yourself if you are considering deploying 802.11ac for your enterprise wireless network. 802.11ac has some great benefits such as wirelike speed and being able to handle a high concentration of clients. However, there is more to consider when deploying 802.11ac. For instance, how do I handle RF interference now that 802.11ac support 80MHz channels? Will legacy devices such as 802.11g/a/n allow me to achieve the best performance that 802.11ac advertises? How can I ensure that my users get the best wireless performance when they roam across a building? And lastly, as more clients join the network, is my performance going to suffer? These are all valid concerns and are something that Cisco addresses with HDX. HDX is High Density Experience and is part of Cisco’s 802.11ac solution. We just wrapped up a 4 part blog series on HDX where we answer these questions:

-          For Interference Mitigation, we have CleanAir for 80MHz Channels

-          Getting the best performance out of your network even with legacy clients, we  have ClientLink 3.0 Read More »

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HDX Blog Series #1: Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a four-part deep dive series into High Density Experience (HDX), Cisco’s latest solution suite designed for high density environments and next-generation wireless technologies. For more on Cisco HDX, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac

CleanAir for 802.11ac:  Why Spectrum Intelligence Still Matters

In wireless networking and communications, as with life, nothing good comes for free. It’s well known that the primary feature of the new IEEE 802.11ac amendment is support for an 80 MHz-wide channel. The benefit of an 80 MHz channel is the potential to double usable throughput in comparison to that of 802.11n using a 40 MHz wide channel.

However, what is less well known is that a wider RF channel is also more susceptible to interference. In other words, 802.11ac devices “hear more” than 802.11n devices, primarily due to the wider channel support. It should be noted that this is not a flaw in the 802.11ac amendment, it’s simply basic communications theory.

Nevertheless, there is far more to building an 802.11ac access point than simply meeting the standard. Not all 802.11ac access points perform equally without interference. But more importantly, not all 802.11ac access points perform well in the presence of interference.

Furthermore, there is far more to deploying High Density wireless LANs than only considering the performance of individual access points. Read More »

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Prepare Your Networks for High Density without Compromising on Performance

A new year means new users and new devices. More devices means more network crowding. Mobile users demand bandwidth and speed, while the network is increasingly overwhelmed by the sheer number of devices. The networks of today and tomorrow have to be ready for high client density environments.

That’s why we’ve developed the Cisco High Density Experience (HDX). I announced HDX in a blog last October with a high level look at Cisco’s answer to handling high client density environments. Each feature in the HDX solution was designed specifically to alleviate the introduction of more clients, more bandwidth hungry applications to provide an unparalleled user experience.

Starting tomorrow we’ll kick off an HDX blog series to dive deep into the four key features that come with HDX:

  1. January 8: CleanAir
  2. January 13: Turbo Performance
  3. January 27: ClientLink 3.0
  4. February 10: Optimized Roaming

For more on Cisco’s approach to 802.11ac, visit www.cisco.com/go/80211ac.

 

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Summary: What Next-Generation Wi-Fi Models Could Mean for Secure Mobility

With the adoption of the Internet of Things and Internet of Everything, advances in mobility and next-generation Wi-Fi are driving faster speeds, higher signal quality and more reliable connectivity, but how are they changing the way we think about mobile security?

As more people connect to both wired and wireless networks via smart phones, tablets and laptops, security will continue to be a top concern. New Wi-Fi models, such as Beamforming and Wi-Fi Direct, are helping drive mobile devices to the faster, more secure 5GHz band, therefore offering secure ways to enable the Internet of Everything to connect more people, processes, data and things.

As mobility trends drive new expectations from networks, a strategic and architectural approach to secure mobility is essential, and next-generation Wi-Fi makes this possible.

Read the full What Next Generation Wi-Fi Could Mean for Secure Mobility blog to learn more.

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What Next-Generation Wi-Fi Models Could Mean for Secure Mobility

With the adoption of the Internet of Things and Internet of Everything, advances in mobility and next-generation Wi-Fi are driving faster speeds, higher signal quality and more reliable connectivity. With the upcoming ratification of the two waves of the 802.11ac Wi-Fi standard, how are emerging Wi-Fi models creating new security features that are defining the next-generation Wi-Fi experience?

Next Generation Wi-Fi Models

Migration to the 5 GHz-only 802.11ac is quickly becoming a reality. In a recent article by Lisa Phifer, Chris Spain, Vice President of Product Marketing for Cisco’s Wireless Networking Group, discusses more about how this migration will drive a shift in mobile device support for 5 GHz. “An increasing percentage of new mobile devices provide dual-band capability, and they generally prefer the less congested 5 GHz band,” Spain said. New Wi-Fi models, like those listed below, can help drive mobile devices to the 5GHz band:

Read More »

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