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The History and Future of TV

- January 3, 2011 - 0 Comments

From the first electromechanical television (the “pantelegraph,” in case it slipped your mind…), to the 64 million people who tuned into a website to view the 2010 World’s cup — and for the 168 years separating those two events — the ways by which we consume video entertainment morphed many times over.

Experience television’s transformation yourself by clicking into The History and Future of Television. It’s a comprehensive compilation of the technical and societal influences that shaped television – to learn from the past, and move with confidence into the changing landscape ahead..  

A sampling of what you’ll find within the timeline:

  • The trajectory of television, from the birth of its inventor, Philo Farnsworth, to the introduction of “community antenna television” – what we now call cable TV
  • The societal impact of television, from the first televised Olympics, in 1936, to 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver — which attracted both Twitter followers and Facebook friends. (In between, the 600 million TV tune-ins in 1969, to watch American astronauts land on the Moon.)
  • The remarkably swift growth of Internet-based activities that better the television experience – from the birth of the World Wide Web, in 1991, to the rapid-fire annual launches of iTunes, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and the iPhone, between 2003-2007.

But don’t let this little summary be your guide! Click here to take a closer look… we’d like to invite you to register to attend a unique social viewing online event at 1pm PST on January 5th, when we announce what we believe will be the next chapter in the evolution of the television experience.

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