Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Digital and Social

Meet Jaime Valencia: Newest Member of the Cisco Support Community Hall of Fame

Jaime’s daily contributions to the Cisco Support Community over the past 6 years have not only helped establish him as a Unified Communications thought leader but also reduce extraneous company costs.

The Cisco Support Community is an online technical support community on which company employees can interact with and respond to questions from Cisco customers and IT professionals. Oftentimes, SME contributors like Jaime who resolve customers’ technical issues by responding to questions on the community have greatly helped avoid opening unnecessary Technical Assistance Center (TAC) cases, ultimately diminishing company costs.

The Cisco Support Community Hall of Fame

The Cisco Support Community Hall of Fame is an exclusive group which highlights top individuals who have showcased long-term contributions to this community. Jaime is the most recent addition to this elite group which consists of a total of 8 members. His high quality contributions over the past 6+ years in the Collaboration, Voice and Video communities are said to have made a significantly positive impact to the overall online community.

Jaime’s Social Activities

Jaime is a Network Consulting Engineer specializing in the Cisco Unified Communications (UC) portfolio of solutions on the Planning, Design and Implementation (PDI) team. Although Jaime is involved with VXi technologies with PDI from the UC perspective, he studies VMWare View and Citrix ICA to get a better understanding of the technology of the whole.  Jaime claims that self-studying also helps him participate on the Cisco Support Community in a more effective manner.

Every day, Jaime volunteers his free time to respond to customers, partners and prospective clients on the Cisco Support Community. Through diverse channels including discussion forums, webcasts, blogs, Ask the Expert events, documents and more, Jaime actively shares his knowledge and expertise with others on this site.

What motivates Jaime to be such an active participant on this online social platform? Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Moving Online to Offline

“Get real” about your connections

We’re hearing all the time how no one really talks anymore because we’d rather look at our screens than each other.  MIT professor Sherry Turkle says some kids are trying to do both and learning how to maintain eye contact with someone while texting someone else.

“The Flight from Conversation”, The New York Times, April 21st


Turkle’s book “Alone Together: Why We expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other”

A recent study says more young people are even giving up a drivers license when they turn 16 because why should they drive to see friends when they can Facebook or Skype them? In 1983, 69% of 17 year olds had a drivers license but in 2008, it fell to 50%. Among 20-24 year olds, it went from 92% to 83% 25 years later.

“Driving is becoming so last century.”  The Associated Press, April 6th

Why’s this important? Because being connected doesn’t always provide us with the human connections we crave. In a USA Today piece, the authors of a new book called “The Face-toFace Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace” say 75% of conversations (in the US) still happen face to face, and that the rise of social media has led to a reduction in mostly” email conversations”. They say we talk about what’s ‘cool’ online and about real life experiences when we’re physically together.

This doesn’t mean it has to be all or nothing! Put those online connections to work. Try a tweet up, Meetup or something really new.

Are you into food? The Meetup equivalent is grubwithus.com where you join groups and see what “social meals” are scheduled at your local restaurants. Culturekitchen.com features underprivileged women who are master chefs of a particular ethnic cuisine. You go into their home and learn to cook the real thing (from Ukranian to Thai).

Travel and activities
Find something new to do with others on Vayable and give “drinking whiskey on wheels” a try. It’s a way for locals to share their expertise (and get paid for it) which means your guide of the Farmers Market is someone who actually goes to it. Airbnb is similar but where people share their home (boat or castle) for a price.

Want to go international?
Wander is an iPhone app that connects you with ‘pen pals’ by using Instagram (30 million users worldwide). You post a picture of the Caltrain in Palo Alto, California and your pen pal posts a picture of a train in Korea. After a week learning one person’s culture, you move on to a new friend.

More mobile platforms
If you’re open about your whereabouts, Arrived notifies friends when you’ve arrived at a meeting or a ball game. (No checkins required.) And Highlight notifies YOU if another Highlight user is within a football field or so of your location. The closer a person is, and the more interests, friends or history you have in common, the more likely you’ll be notified.

Remember, life is all about balance. We either use our time online to enrich our lives or it’s time spent just looking at a screen. I’ll be trying out grubwithus and Vayable soon and will write about my experiences. I appreciate all your comments!

Tags: , ,

Meet Doug Alger: Master Data Center Blogger

An IT Architect with over 15 years of experience within Data Center, Doug practices AND preaches a number of different blogging best practices.

Doug’s blog posts are interesting, customer-centric, and boast wide readership. Perhaps due to his background in Journalism, he knows how to hook his reader’s attention from the start. Through his Cisco Blog website, he shares his Data Center expertise and real-world experiences from the Cisco IT organization with an informal and personal tone of voice. 

Doug’s blog posts are exceptional in the sense that he uses innovative methods to share content and displays advanced blogging skills. Moreover, Cisco Blogs Manager Lindsay Hamilton has praised his practice of using tags. For example, he always adds the same tag for all posts in a particular series; consequently, he can easily promote his blog and organize it on the blogging platform since WordPress creates a unique URL for each tag.

Data Deconstructed Blog Series

Perhaps one of Doug’s most commendable social activities includes creating the “forum-like” blog series “Data Center Deconstructed,” through which he has shared useful information about Data Centers since March 2011. This series encourages readers to ask any questions related to Data Center, and then Doug answers them with video blogs containing self-recorded videos. With his frequent and creative blog posts, he has helped generate excitement and drive visits to the Inside Cisco IT Blog on which he publishes his blog posts.

Watch this short video in which Doug introduces the Data Center Deconstructed blog series:

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Play the Cisco Global Events Mobile App Game for a Chance to Win #ragancisco

According to the Cisco Visual Networking Index (VNI) study, “by the end of 2012, the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth, and by 2016 there will be 1.4 mobile devices per capita”. Actually, I’m already a member of the “1.4 mobile devices per capita” group. I’d even say I am married to my 1.4 mobile devices.

If you’re like me and can’t imagine stepping out of your home without your phone or tablet, don’t miss out on Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How do I test thee? Let me count the ways…

The Cisco.com support site is evaluated every day by each user who uses the site. It is also tested through more prescriptive methods, such as third-party evaluations, audits and diagnostic tests. The feedback from all of these is used to gauge how we’re doing and where we should focus our efforts in the future.

These diverse sources of feedback are critical to a well rounded and complete understanding of the web site’s performance.

In the past year, the support site has been recognized by organizations that perform independent evaluations of web sites as a source of best practices. Some of these are professional organizations and carry significant weight in the industry. Others are independent groups that have developed methodologies to evaluate and score web sites and publish their results as a resource. In both cases, we are grateful to have been called out as a leader among peer companies.

The support site is also evaluated by organizations that track product quality. These groups often send auditors who investigate probe the processes that are used in creating, managing and operating the website. These evaluations are extremely thorough and ultimately are a reflection of the website, the products, the people and the company.

Finally, we subject the support site to our own testing in order to track progress.

We conduct user-cenetered research (such as usability testing) on specific features of the site as needed. These studies are variable in frequency and the questions are optimized for the specific research objectives. And we conduct ‘benchmark’ tests which have routine schedules and fixed protocols.

One of these tests is performed every six months and taps many aspects of the site to ensure the basic functions are performing properly. This diagnostic tool is “a mile wide and an inch deep” meaning it does not exercise any specific part of the site in deep rigor, but is more like a check-up to make sure the site is healthy on a macro level. Even so, we get valuable insights from the scores of each individual task and are able to compare scores with previous tests since the test is identical each time it is performed.